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Three years ago we launched ProtonMail. Today, we’re launching ProtonVPN.


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Three years ago we launched ProtonMail. Today, we’re launching ProtonVPN.

 

ProtonVPN-Secure-Internet-Anywhere-VPN.j

We’re happy to announce that as of 12:00PM Geneva time today, ProtonVPN is now available to the general public. ProtonVPN is officially out of beta and we are allowing open signups for the first time.

You can now directly get ProtonVPN by visiting https://protonvpn.com

 

After more than 1 year of development, and four months of beta testing by over 10’000 members of the ProtonMail community, we’re finally making ProtonVPN available to everyone. And we really mean everyone, because consistent with our mission to make privacy and security accessible to every single person in the world, we’re also releasing ProtonVPN as a free VPN service.

 

It has been a long and exciting journey to get here since our team first met at CERN in 2013. Back then, we had an ambitious vision to build an Internet that was free and could continue to reach its full potential as a tool for social progress. Indeed, that was the vision that inspired Tim Berners-Lee to create the World Wide Web at CERN in 1989.

 

Since then, the Internet has met or even exceeded its promise in certain areas, but this has not come without a cost to society. While the Internet has done a great deal of good, over the course of this digital revolution, we have also lost control over our data, our most intimate secrets, and ultimately our privacy. In certain countries, the Internet has even become a tool for oppression and control, instead of the beacon of hope and freedom it once was.

 

Back in 2013, we embarked on a journey to change this, by building the tools that could make privacy and security the default online. In 2014, on the 25th anniversary of the web, our efforts culminated with the release of ProtonMail, the world’s first end-to-end encrypted email service. Since then millions of people around the world have embraced our vision, and thanks to your support (and the numerous donations along the way), email is much safer today than it was several years ago.

 

However, when considering the scope of all that we do online, email is just a small piece of the online world. That’s why we have decided to build ProtonVPN, to better protect the activists, journalists, and individuals who are currently using ProtonMail to secure their online lives. A VPN (Virtual Private Network) allows users to browse the web without being tracked, bypass online censorship blocks, and also increases security by passing all internet traffic through a strongly encrypted tunnel.

 

The importance of VPNs for online security and privacy is increasing day by day. Back in April of this year, Obama-era FTC rules designed to protect the privacy of internet browsing history were rolled back. Fast forward to today, and attempts are being made to dismantle net neutrality in the US, and several European governments are now calling for increased online surveillance. Last but not least, for over 1.5 billion people around the world, the Internet does not live up to its promise of freedom of information. Instead, the Internet is a highly restricted and censored place, constantly under surveillance, where making a wrong move could lead to imprisonment or worse.

 

We are also aware that as ProtonMail becomes a stronger force for digital freedom, the censorship of ProtonMail in certain countries is not a matter of if, but a matter of when. Earlier this year, we took the first steps to improve ProtonMail’s availability under censorship by launching an Onion site. With ProtonVPN, we can ensure the accessibility of not only ProtonMail, but all of the world’s digital knowledge and information. This is why we are committed to providing a free version of ProtonVPN.

 

However, we have done more than make ProtonVPN free. We have also worked to make it the best VPN service ever created, by addressing many of the common pitfalls with VPNs. For example, ProtonVPN features a Secure Core architecture which routes traffic through multiple encrypted tunnels in multiple countries to better defend against network based attacks, and also features seamless integration with the Tor anonymity network. You can learn about all the steps we took to build a secure VPN here.

 

Lastly, we’re building a VPN service that can be worthy of your trust. We understand that when it comes to VPNs, trust is paramount. Whether it is our transparent VPN threat model, our Swiss jurisdiction, our reputation, our relationship with the community, or the fact that you actually know who we are, we’re committed to building and operating ProtonVPN with the same level of transparency that has come to characterize ProtonMail.

 

To all of you who have supported us over the years, thank you for your support. Unlike companies like Google and Facebook who abuse user privacy to sell advertisements, ProtonMail and ProtonVPN are entirely dependent on users upgrading to paid accounts to cover operating expenses. Without your support, these projects would not be able to thrive and grow. If you appreciate the security and privacy that ProtonVPN provides, and have the means to do so, please consider upgrading to a paid account. This allows us to support the millions around the world without these means.

 

With your help, the revolution we have started with ProtonMail will continue, and we will reach the day where the Internet serves all of us equally, and reaches its full potential as a tool for freedom.

 

Best Regards,
The Proton Technologies Team

 

You can find our launch press release here:

 

Follow ProtonVPN on Social Media:

Facebook: facebook.com/ProtonVPN
Twitter: twitter.com/ProtonVPN
Reddit: reddit.com/r/ProtonVPN

 

To get a free ProtonVPN account, visit: protonvpn.com

 

To get a free ProtonMail encrypted email account, visit: protonmail.com

ProtonVPN Admin

We are the scientists, engineers, and developers who build ProtonMail, the world's largest encrypted email service. We're now building ProtonVPN also to ensure that everybody can have access to free and secure internet.

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Looks like the free version does not do torrents, it does not have what they call "Plus Servers", or am I wrong. I hope I am wrong. Looking for a new free VPN that works for torrents but isnt way slow.

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53 minutes ago, pc71520 said:

Swiss-based Privacy. ;)

 Swiss-based Government spy

Quote

Internet censorship in Switzerland

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Internet censorship in Switzerland is regulated by Federal Supreme Court of Switzerland on a case by case basis. Internet services provided by the registered with BAKOM Internet service providers (ISPs) are subject to a "voluntary recommendation" by the Federal Supreme Court of Switzerland, which requires blocking of websites just after 18.12.2007. [1][2] As of October 2015, this might change soon and additional topics like Online gambling are on the focus now. [3]

 

(the information about government spy are much better in german language, but that will not help you)

 

Don't use it if you are located in Europe

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looks pretty good, reasonable speed with canadian ip, didn't try to torrent yet to see if works or not.

 

8hc7sN2.png

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21 hours ago, Togijak said:

Swiss-based Government spy

Thanks for the heads up.

 

 

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11 minutes ago, Agent 86 said:

Have you tried torrents yet? I was gonna try myself but got this when trying to d/l the free version! lol

http://s10.postimg.org/uxi6qoozt/proton_VPN.jpg

I'm on mobile right now and also they automatically activated a 7 day premium trial so  I can't test it until turn free version.

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  • 1 month later...
On 6/20/2017 at 10:45 AM, Togijak said:

 Swiss-based Government spy

 

(the information about government spy are much better in german language, but that will not help you)

 

Don't use it if you are located in Europe

ProtonMail have admitted over on  reddit.com more than once that they  been assisting law enforcement for years. It just depends on what you have done  and they think there the judge  they don't have an obligation to share this with the authorities.but they do  it because they want too . It's pseudo privacy . They can read your metadata (subject, recipient, sender, times, etc.) but it's not possible for them to read the body or attachments. This is what they  give law enforcement is what they can see.

https://www.reddit.com/r/ProtonMail/comments/6ru9pf/ive_had_enough_of_protonmail_heres_why/dl7w2fk/?context=3

Only mail service that was  known too stand up against law enforcement is Lavabit and they had too close up for awhile because off it.

 

I read most of there Ips are blocked by clouldflare  like TOR is this defeats the purpose of using a VPN

 

7co5mm4ond71161.png
 

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2 hours ago, steven36 said:

Only mail service that was  known too stand up against law enforcement is Lavabit and they had too close up for awhile because off it.

 

@steven36

 

Is it true that you are not better informed? Ladar Levison and his service is is back https://lavabit.com/about.html

 

Quote

Privacy Pledge

Lavabit will not release any information related to an individual user unless legally compelled to do so.

As a necessity Lavabit is required to store private information. In the interest of openness we would like to detail exactly what private information is collected, how that information is used and who has access to that information.

The most private information we store is Internet e-mail. For e-mail, we have two separate stores: one for outgoing mail and one for incoming mail. Messages are only stored for as long as necessary. In the case of outgoing e-mail, the message is only retained until it is successfully delivered. Incoming e-mail is stored until a user a) issues a command requesting that a message be deleted or B) the user account is terminated.

Only a select number of Lavabit administrators have access to servers that store messages, and all administrators have been trained such that they should never need to access the private e-mail of a user.

For premium users who have elected to use our “secure” service, incoming e-mail is stored using an asynchronous encryption process that guarantees that it can’t be accessed by anyone except the holder of the account password. For these accounts, only the encrypted version of the message is ever saved to disk.

Incoming e-mail is optionally scanned by the Lavabit antivirus engine and the statistical spam filter. All outgoing e-mail is scanned by the Lavabit antivirus engine. It should be noted that the antivirus engine retains no record of a particular message once it has been scanned. The statistical spam filter does store hashed token data about messages. This token data is used to assess future messages. In theory, an attacker with unlimited computing power could use these hashes to build a profile of the most common words used in a person’s e-mail. In practice it is considered impossible to determine what word equates to a particular hash. It should also be noted that the spam filter doesn’t store any information regarding what order tokens appear in or what messages contained what tokens. However, in the interest of privacy, we are disclosing this information.

A record of outgoing messages is maintained in the e-mail server logs for a short period of time (typically seven days). This record includes generic information, such as the sender, recipient and time of a message. No record of incoming e-mail is retained once a message is deleted.

The Lavabit servers also collect private information in the web server log files. The log files store basic information about what IP addresses access our site, what web browser was used, what file was accessed and what time that access occurred.

All log files are exclusively analyzed by automated programs to detect statistical trends. These trends allow our administrators to identify and correct problems. All log files containing private information are typically deleted within seven days.

To provide better service, Lavabit records basic statistical information about its accounts. This information includes the last time a particular account was used and aggregate numbers on how many messages have been sent or received by a particular account. These records allow us to purge inactive accounts and provide aggregate statistics, including the number of active accounts and the number of messages processed daily.

When a new user registers for Lavabit, the user’s subnet is temporarily stored in memory. This information is used to prevent more than three new user registrations in a 24-hour period. We do not record any information that would allow us to correlate the IP from which a particular account was registered.

It is also important to know what information Lavabit does NOT store. We do not keep a record of the IP addresses used to access our services (except in the web server logs), and we not keep a record of what information was accessed during a particular session.

On a final note, the Lavabit e-mail servers do record the IP address used to send an outgoing message in the header of an outgoing e-mail. Because of this, it is possible for the recipient of a message to identify what IP was used to send a message. We record this information in the message header so that law enforcement officials in possession of a message that violates the law can identify the original sender. Lavabit does not retain this information.

Though Lavabit’s services are intentionally designed to protect a user’s privacy we do not condone, endorse or encourage the use of our services for illegal activities. In cases where abuse is reported to our administrators, we reserve the right to forward any complaint that our abuse team receives to law enforcement officials. However, in accordance with the policy above, we will not surrender any private information without a court order; only the information we receive from the complainant.

Lavabit reserves the right to update this Privacy Policy at its discretion and without notice or consideration. The most current version of the Privacy Policy can always be viewed using the Privacy Policy hypertext link at the bottom of all web pages. Agreement to this policy is a prerequisite for the use of any Lavabit service.

Last Modified: January 20th, 2017 (revisions pending)

 

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2 hours ago, Togijak said:

 

@steven36

 

Is it true that you are not better informed? Ladar Levison and his service is is back https://lavabit.com/about.html

 

 

I know his service is back  and  i was talking about before not now ,

Quote

 

Founder Ladar Levison launched Lavabit in 2004 on the principle that everyone—individuals, organizations and businesses—has the innate right to private, secure communication.

In 2013, we suspended service to protect our global customers when the U.S. government ordered us to release our Transport Layer Security private keys. To protect your digital privacy and freedom, we said no.

 

The Government  wanted access too the keys too get access too snowden's emails so they shut down instead. There the only email in the USA I know for a fact that didn't grant direct access too the government. At lest Lavabit  needs a court order..

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11 minutes ago, 0bin said:

tutanota get access?

ProtonMail  for 3 years  have been giving out  info like there the  Judge  and  not the courts.  .. ProtonMail  are not a legal entity so they shouldn't  be doing that. They police  don't need a court order too get info from ProtonMail.  If ProtonMail thinks it's bad enough they always help them,  And you can't trust no email on the clearnet too keep you anonymous. Only they offer some privacy  if you want  more try a email on the darknet.

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9 minutes ago, 0bin said:

who develop ransomware will switch to other mails

it's the same as  a VPN  they  don't make you anonymous they only offer some privacy because they use  end to end encryption. Most likely anyone who make ransomware already have a email on the darknet if there not stupid .

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13 minutes ago, 0bin said:

How they did when there is pgp used for e-mail? No clear text, protonmail able to read it?

protonmail can't read you're email , They can read your metadata (subject, recipient, sender, times, etc.) This is very helpful too the police at times.. they use this data with all the data they have from everywhere else they collected on you  too make a case. only parts of protonmail  is encrypted.

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Just now, 0bin said:

Is there a way to encrypt also metadata I think?

If you want more than privacy use the darknet  also no email is private if someone using another email sends you email from another email.. are if you send a email too one that dont use end to end  in the body of the email. There are a lot of holes in emails  and it's only going get worse as new laws pass . 

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8 minutes ago, 0bin said:

you saying tormail?

Torbox

Quote

 

A rather simple provider is Torbox, a TOR-only service. This means that no clearweb connections are made, making this email darkweb exclusive. If the recipient isn’t using a Torbox-certified provider, the email will not be sent, even if it’s darkweb compatible. Currently Torbox supports emails to and from lelantos.org, maskedmail.com, mail2tor.com, mailtor.net and safe-mail.net.

Torbox is a strictly Tor email and has no intention of releasing a clearweb friendly service in the near future. Torbox is 100% free and offers 25 megabytes at signup and offers more disk space for bitcoin donations. All email data stored on servers is encrypted due to the server itself using encrypted partitions.

As the name suggests, Torbox is a Tor-exclusive email, where no packet or email header will ever hit the clearweb.

 

 

 

Mail2Tor

Quote

Mail2Tor is only accessible via the Tor network but can both receive dark web and clearweb emails, making this another dual compatible setup. The site is quite minimalist and doesn’t provide a whole lot of information outside of it being a Tor-only email provider. The service has been around for quite awhile and has served the Tor community well during its time.

 

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7 minutes ago, 0bin said:

0bin is also good to store notes. I encrypt them.

The darknet is safe as long as you don't leave a trial back back too the clearnet .

 

Quote

And although this is often due to leaders of these sites being shockingly terrible when it comes to opsec — the creator of AlphaBay was reportedly found because he had posted his incredibly Hotmail-esque email address, [email protected], on the network during his early days on the site — it’s still somewhat reassuring that the cycle of events seems to be so fixed.

http://nymag.com/selectall/2017/07/what-alphabay-seizure-means-for-the-dark-web.html

Five stupid things Dread Pirate Roberts did to get arrested

https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2013/oct/03/five-stupid-things-dread-pirate-roberts-did-to-get-arrested

Most people are noobs at opsec and that gets them caught every time.

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9 minutes ago, 0bin said:

I don't go on the darknet, I'm scared of those things with rabbits mask on lines. I saw some photos and I don't like their mental experiments trying to conditioning me. There is already another net better than tor.

well you well never be able too achieve anonymity only you will be able too achieve some privacy ..Most people on the clearnet and some on the darknet  if they ever really done anything have a trail 10 miles wide leading right back too them. There just wannabes  and for 10 mins of fame they go too prison.

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5 minutes ago, 0bin said:

so what's the meaning of that people with rabbits? Some of their photo first shocked me.

But that was at the beginning when i searched on clearnet what darknet was

Oh there is far worse than that on there.. it means don't be hacking into places on there were some of the crazy people on there may come after you in real life.  :)

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3 minutes ago, 0bin said:

They ever come after someone?

Look it up on YouTube..They scared one hacker so bad  he never went back and gave up hacking. 

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11 minutes ago, 0bin said:

For that is better always preemptive audit. I don't care of their business. There are already people interested in them.

That youtube videos play with scary images, but at level of content there is not so much.

They called stories.

Worse thing, youtube leave that open to anyone to view. That is bad.

You dont have too be interested in them if you  go in the wrong places without clearance they will be interested in you .

 

3 minutes ago, 0bin said:

Someone is listening: better stop talking about this:

 

 

Remember me of Matrix when there are two cats, there is an agent.

Yes lets stop talking about it  before one of them hire a hitman too come after us , good luck i never leave my real info on the internet.. :P

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1 minute ago, 0bin said:

Anyway there is already another net, not relying on tor, about tor, like on clear net people doing bad things. They are not immune to be tracked because intelligence already cracked them. If they treat someone there is good chance they all go in jail.

The biggest problem  with Tor and people who start websites are there own ignorance . Even if you download something on there that is NSA or FBI malware you done it to yourself.. And if you leave a trail back too the clear net you done it too yourself . The biggest problem  with Hackers on the darknet is  they like too hack and hack into places were these crazy people are hackers too and will get you back. As far as any other net if if it's already open too the public it's public domain and the cops are already there .

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23 hours ago, steven36 said:

Only mail service that was known to stand up against law enforcement is Lavabit

and they had to close up for awhile because off it.

Edward Snowden's favorite e-mail service

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