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Windows 10 Pro for Advanced PCs comes with a replacement for the classic NTFS file system


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Last night, we reported that three new Windows 10 SKUs were revealed through Windows 10 Build 16212 pkeyconfig. We speculated that Windows 10 Pro for Advanced PCs will presumably have licensing and optimisations targeted to the powerful multi-core PCs with masses of RAM and petabyte hard drives. Few hours back, Microsoft’s official documentation on Windows 10 Pro for Advanced PCs got leaked on Twitter. The slide refers to “Windows 10 Pro for Advanced PCs” as “Windows 10 Pro for Workstation PCs”, it is a placeholder name for the same. For the initial release of Windows 10 Pro for Workstation, Microsoft is focusing on the below 4 key features, including the new ReFS file system that was introduced with Windows Server 2012.

 

  • Workstation Mode: Microsoft will optimize the OS to provide peak performance and reliability in graphics and compute intensive use cases when the Workstation mode is engaged by the users.
  • Resilient file system: ReFS is the successor of NTFS, which has been a mainstay of Windows for past several years. ReFS is designed for fault-tolerance, optimized for handling large data volume, auto-correcting and much more at the same time backward compatible with NTFS.
  • Faster file sharing: Microsoft is including the SMBDirect protocol based file sharing in Windows 10 Pro for Workstation which allows for high throughput, low latency and low CPU utilization when accessing network shares
  • Expanded hardware support: Microsoft is expanding hardware support in Windows 10 Pro for Workstation. Users will now be able to run Windows 10 Pro for Workstation on machines with up to 4 CPUs (todays limit of 2), and add memory up to 6TB.

 

Microsoft is in discussions with their advanced users, and will continue to bring more features to this high-end segment of the market.

 

Source: Windows 10 Pro for Advanced PCs comes with a replacement for the classic NTFS file system (MSPoweruser)

 

Paul Thurrott on why this is a bad idea... There Should Be Only One Windows 10 Product Edition (Thurrott)

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Looks like it will require a lot of work in order to be able for everyone to use it.

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Windows is becoming like Linux  more and more fragmented ..But instead of many sectors being responsible like Linux . Microsoft is  fragmenting there self . Like Linux you have Ubuntu made for ease of use and the rest of distros  treat there users like Hobbits that they should   fix problems themselves .  Them you have phones that still run on Linux like Android witch have more users than Windows now ...If  it would of not been for Diehards who that dont like closed source  Desktop Linux would been successful like Android was. Linus Torvalds said once people don't use a OS they use the software on a OS and when people start talking about a OS there is something wrong with it. And due too lack of apps desktop Linux was never successful. Then Microsoft makes a version of Windows that is restricted  to what kind of apps you can use  .

 

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So this is like the middle ground between Desktop and Server OS hardware limits. When you have a machine with specs beyond 10 Pro limit, but still need to use the machine as a workstation, this 10 Pro for Workstation is what you install instead of setting up the Server version to be used as a workstation OS.

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7 hours ago, Tunerz said:

So this is like the middle ground between Desktop and Server OS hardware limits. When you have a machine with specs beyond 10 Pro limit, but still need to use the machine as a workstation, this 10 Pro for Workstation is what you install instead of setting up the Server version to be used as a workstation OS.

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As per the slide, Windows 10 Pro for Workstation or "Advanced" PCs is targeted at machines with up to four CPUs and six terabytes of memory.

 

The version will include four key capabilities in the initial release, including a workstation mode, the Resilient file system or ReFS, which succeeds Microsoft's NTFS file system, faster file sharing, and expanded hardware support.

 

Microsoft says the new version is the result of its analysis of Windows 10 Pro on high-end machines and questions about how it can benefit advanced PC users.

 

For Workstation mode, Microsoft says it is "identifying typical compute- and graphics-intensive workloads" and that it will "optimize the OS to provide peak performance and reliability in such cases when the Workstation mode is engaged by the users".

 

http://www.zdnet.com/article/windows-10-leak-shows-microsoft-building-new-version-for-power-pcs-workstations/

 

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Microsoft totters from time machine clutching Windows 10 Workstation

 

uxpndRL.jpg

 

It looks like the 1990s are back in fashion: Microsoft is, it seems, preparing another flavor of Windows 10 – the tentatively named Windows 10 Pro for Workstations.

We can't help but be reminded of the Windows NT Workstation era in the early 1990s – the branding Microsoft used to distance Windows for beefy work PCs from Windows for your home computer.

Last week, Redmond apologized for accidentally emitting broken internal builds of its operating system to beta testers on the Windows Insider program. Those builds included references to new variants of Windows: a Windows Server 2016, and two forms of Windows 10 Pro for Advanced PCs – one normal and the other to comply with EU requirements.

 

Microsoft hasn't quite decided on the final name for those last two: Windows 10 Pro for Advanced PCs is, we're told, an alternative moniker for Windows 10 Pro for Workstation PCs, which on Monday was detailed in leaked internal slides. These slides appear to be notes to marketing staff, are marked confidential and under NDA, and presumably made their way onto Twitter after being shared with Microsoft's partners.

 

It appears Workstations is designed for hefty machines that linger in the no man's land between top-end desktop PCs and low to mid-range servers. It will initially run on machines with up to four physical CPUs, whereas Windows 10 right now supports one or two physical processors, and up to 6TB of RAM versus today's 2TB limit. From October 1, this year, "tier 1" Workstation installations will work with up to four Intel Xeon or AMD Operton processors, and "tier 2" will support more than four, we're told.

 

The Workstations build will also have full support for Redmond's Resilient File System (ReFS), introduced in Server 2012 – and in a limited form in Windows 8.1 – to replace NTFS that Microsoft has used since Windows NT 3.1, well back in the day.

"We were overdue for a file system innovation, and our Windows Insiders also agreed," the poorly written notes accompanying the slide state. "ReFS is designed for fault tolerance, optimized for handling large data volume, auto-correcting and much more, at the same time backward compatible with NTFS."

 

The ReFS system mentioned will be the full server edition, and is backed up by faster file sharing using SMBDirect, which allows the use of network adapters that have remote direct memory access (RDMA) capability. That offloads some of the processor power need for big file shares across the network.

 

All in all, it's a far cry from the last Windows build Microsoft dubbed "workstation" – Windows NT 3.5 to 4.0 in the 1990s. Those builds were popular with admins and power users who weren't interested in flimsy Windows 3, 95 and 98, and some at Microsoft might remember those days fondly.

 

"We have nothing to share," a Microsoft spokesperson told The Register with reference to the leaked info.

 

https://www.theregister.co.uk/2017/06/06/windows_10_for_workstations/

 

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I wouldn't call  ReFS  the successor of NTFS especially in terms of speed. ReFS is just better for data integrity if you are not using any hardware for that.

But if you do use a raid controller for data integrity then stay away from ReFS cause there will be conflicts. 

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26 minutes ago, haxzion said:

I wouldn't call  ReFS  the successor of NTFS especially in terms of speed. ReFS is just better for data integrity.

It's crazy man  they releasing windows for noobs aka Windows 10 S and now Windows for Workstations again . Why cant they just make one good version of windows  like they done when they made Windows XP and Windows 7.?  Linux was able to run  64 cores/CPUs way back there  and now it can run 256 cores/CPUs.  Microsoft are way behind in this regard and trying to play catch up this is the reason most of the worlds super PCs are Linux . :P

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Only if M$ knew...what they are really doing...:tooth:

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