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  1. Realtek HD Audio Manager is a handy way to control and make quick tweaks on your audio adapters without much effort. Even more, it automatically detects the newly added audio accessories, making audio setups more convenient for you. It also has a bunch of features that music lovers would find useful every single time, from noise suppression and acoustic echo cancellation to sound recorder and more. However, it is just like other programs that sometimes face issues. And if you are one of those who recently found it missing on your Windows system, there’s a simple fix for that: download and reinstall Realtek HD Audio Manager in your Windows. Most Windows machines come installed with Realtek HD Audio Manager or driver. You can check it by going to your Device Manager by simply right-clicking the Start button. After opening it, scroll down and look for the “Sound, video and game controllers” option. Click it to expand the list of devices or drivers. If you find the Realtek High Definition Audio, it confirms that your machine indeed has the Realtek HD Audio Manager, and you are just probably encountering a problem with it. Updating Realtek HD Audio is a quick way to resolve your issue. Just right-click on it to get the “update driver” option, select “Search automatically for updated driver software,” and Windows will do the job for you. However, doing this does not guarantee the best results, so manually downloading and reinstalling Realtek HD Audio Manager in your Windows 10 or 11 is much more recommended. The first step is to uninstall the Realtek High Definition Audio from the items under the Sound, video and game controllers option within the Device Manager. It is an important step to ensure the success of the reinstallation of the Realtek HD Audio driver and prevent further problems. So, instead of selecting the update option for the Realtek High Definition Audio, choose “Uninstall device.” Confirm your decision by checking the box that says “Delete the driver software for this device,” and select OK. Follow the steps that will appear in the prompt to complete the process. After that, click the View tab at the top of the Device Manager and select “Show hidden devices” to uninstall other duplicate drivers. Once your PC is clean of the Realtek HD Audio driver, you need to get the suitable Realtek HD Audio driver for your system. Realtek provides a list of different versions of its HD audio codecs software on its download page, including ZIP and executable file versions. Find the one that fits your system and click the download icon beside it. If you are using Intel NUC8i7BE, NUC8i5BE, and NUC8i3BE products, you can check the Realtek High Definition Audio Driver for Windows 10 and Windows 11 on Intel’s site. Intel also offers Realtek High Definition Audio Driver for Windows 10 64-bit and Windows 11 for the 11th Generation Intel NUC11PHKi7C products. You can also try to obtain the latest Realtek HD Audio driver via your motherboard manufacturer’s website. Just get your motherboard manufacturer brand and system model name details by pressing Windows + R and typing the msinfo32 command. After that, visit your manufacturer’s official website and download the Realtek HD audio manager using the information you have. Once you have downloaded the file, locate it within your PC system and start the installation process (if you chose the ZIP version, unzip it first at an easy-to-access location). Run the downloaded file and select Next to confirm your actions. It might take some time, but once the Realtek HD Audio Manager is reinstalled, your PC will ask you for a restart. Do it to complete the steps. After restarting, you can check if the installation is successful by visiting the Device Manager again and looking for the updated Realtek High Definition Audio under the Sound, video and game controllers option. If it is not there, you can simply repeat the process of running the downloaded file until the driver appears in the Device Manager. How to reinstall the latest Realtek HD Audio Manager on Windows 10 and 11
  2. Microsoft began rolling out its Windows 11, version 22H2 feature update last month. In case you missed it, you can read all about 22H2 and what's new in it in these articles here. Now that Windows 11 is out of the way, Microsoft is now preparing to release the 22H2 feature update for Windows 10 as well. First spotted back in June, the Redmond giant confirmed during the Windows 11 2022 update rollout that the one for Windows 10 is also heading out soon. According to the company, we should see the rollout happening in October itself. Naturally, that would mean internally the company is preparing to deploy it to its servers soon and as such, ISO download links have already been spotted. Similar to what happened ahead of the Windows 11 22H2 release, two ISO links for Windows 10 22H2 have been spotted on the TechBench dump website. While one can not download the 2022 update yet since the links aren't live, their presence confirms the general availability (GA) rollout of the 22H2 feature update for Windows 10 is quite close. In the case of Windows 11, the links were added just a few days ahead of the release itself. In terms of what to expect, Microsoft has suggested a "scoped" set of features are coming, though do not expect anything absolutely out of the ordinary. If you can't wait for Microsoft, you can upgrade to Windows 10 22H2 today by following our guide. Source: TechBench dump via techosarusrex (Twitter) Microsoft's Windows 10 22H2 shipment is almost ready as ISO download links are spotted
  3. Windows Auto Dark Mode is one of those small ingenious apps that fix what Microsoft refuses to do on a system level for some reason. It automatically switches between dark and light modes depending on specific time or geolocation. Due to changes in the Windows 11 2022 Update, the app suffered from various issues and graphical glitches. Luckily, the latest update is here to fix that. Auto Dark Mode X 10.2.0 is now available for download from the app or its GitHub repository. According to developer notes, version 10.2.0 aims to fix Windows 11 2022 Update-related issues by rewriting the entire theme logic. There still might be some problems to resolve, but the overall experience should be much better. In addition, the latest release adds the option to postpone theme switching when the device is in use. Here is the full changelog: New Features: Postpone theme switch when your computer is in use! Improvements: Windows 11 22H2 compatibility by rewriting the entire theme logic Ability to set custom script timeout on a per-script basis. This is a potential breaking change and requires reconfiguration of scripts Hotkeys now support using the Windows key Unwanted theme changes are now tracked via WMI instead of a timer that only checks every few minutes You can download Windows Auto Dark Mode X from the Microsoft Store or GitHub, where people with the right skills can contribute to the app's development. Auto Dark Mode is free and has no ads or bloat. Windows Auto Dark Mode gets fixes for Windows 11 22H2 and other improvements
  4. Windows 11 will mark its first anniversary next month. The operating system has already received its first feature update, and Microsoft plans to drop another set of new capabilities next month. The 2022 Update and its feature improvements are enough for some users to finally pull the trigger and upgrade to Windows 11, while others keep using good-old Windows 10 as they see no solid reasons to migrate or are unable to. Microsoft has received a fair amount of complaints for controversial feature changes (primarily for crippled taskbar). As most Windows users discuss new capabilities and things Microsoft has taken away (without intent to bring them back), one question remains unanswered: what about energy efficiency? Does Windows 11 give you better battery life? Test configuration Like our recent browser efficiency test, it's time to look at how identical hardware behaves when running four different operating systems: Windows 11 21H2 (original release) Windows 11 2022 Update (version 22H2) Windows 11 Dev (build 25201) Windows 10 (version 21H2) To make the test as accurate as possible, we have clean-installed each system on four different partitions before looping PCMark10 Extended three times from 100% to dead battery. We have signed into our Microsoft account and installed the latest drivers available for each version. Each installation had no extra third-party software. Here is the test device (upgraded from 8GB to 16GB of RAM since the browser efficiency test): HP Pavilion 14 x360 Processor 11th Gen Intel Core i3-1125G4 at 2.00 GHz RAM 16GB DDR4 3200 MHz Storage 500GB PCIe SSD Screen 14-inch touchscreen. 1920x1080 pixels at 40% brightness Power Mode Balanced, Battery Saver at 20% Standard Windows configuration Battery 43Wh with 50 cycles, 0% wear reported We have picked PCMark10 Extended to simulate the standard home and office use that includes video conferencing, office apps, photo/video editing, gaming, browsing, etc. Some might argue that PCMark10 might be unoptimized for Windows 11, but remember that not every software you use has already received updates for the newest OS (some never will). We try to see how a single set of software affects battery life in different operating systems. Before you grab your torch and pitchfork: You might get slightly different results depending on your software and hardware configuration, battery capacity, battery wear, drivers, brightness, power mode etc. Consider this more an experiment rather than a scientific claim. Testing It appears that those wanting to get the most out of the battery inside their Windows laptop or tablet might want to stick to Windows 10 for some time. Three Windows 11 versions showed the more-or-less identical result, achieving about three hours of life under strain of the PCMark10 Extended benchmark. As for Windows 10, Microsoft's "previous-gen" operating system showed a notably better result, surviving for an extra 18 minutes. That might sound not-so-impressive to you, but it is an 11% uplift under a stress test. An 11% worse battery life is nothing to scoff at, especially for the operating system that many consider just a Windows 10 reskin. Windows 10 - 3 hours 12 minutes Windows 11 Dev - 3 hours 3 minutes Windows 11 2022 Update - 3 hours 2 minutes Windows 11 21H2 - 2 hours 54 minutes A part of our browser efficiency test also proves that Windows 10 is better at giving you the best battery life. Running a 1080p YouTube video in Microsoft Edge has revealed similar results—when running Windows 10, our laptop lasted 35 minutes longer than Windows 11. Windows 10 - 5 hours 24 minutes Windows 11 Dev - 4 hours 55 minutes Windows 11 21H2 - 4 hours 53 minutes Windows 11 2022 Update - 4 hours 50 minutes Conclusion Windows 11 is arguably a good operating system, and its latest feature update makes it even better. Still, even one year after the initial release, many users consider Windows 11 raw, and not without reasons. Besides missing some capabilities Microsoft should not have removed, Windows 11 appears to be worse at energy efficiency on some hardware configurations. Microsoft itself says Windows 10 is "a great place to be," so you will be excused for wanting to keep using the old operating system for a bit longer. On the other side, the 10% difference does not seem like unrepairable damage. You can mitigate the loss by adjusting the display brightness, tweaking your power mode, or using extra features in specific apps like battery saver in Microsoft Edge, which proved itself quite an efficient way to improve battery time. Windows 11 also has the Dynamic Refresh Rate feature on devices with high refresh rate displays that can save some battery juice by reducing the refresh rate without a perceivable downgrade in image smoothness. Finally, there are customers who love Windows 11 and its features, so a slightly worse battery life is an acceptable trade-off for running the latest operating systems with a much better UI, Android apps support, improved consistency (Windows 8-styled volume/brightness slider is finally gone), new productivity features, significantly improved accessibility, and gaming enhancements. Windows 11 will not make your battery life twice as worse than Windows 10, so it may be worth a try. Although there are scattered complaints about battery life downgrade, we have not heard any wide-spread reports of Windows 11 causing critical damage to a device with an otherwise decent battery life. Those on the verge of upgrading should also remember that Microsoft allows going back to Windows 10 without reinstalling the operating system and all the apps (unless you perform a disk cleanup). But if you think that Windows 11 currently does not provide a killer feature, there is another reason to stick with Windows 10. Microsoft will keep supporting Windows 10 until October 2025, so you have three more years to decide, and Microsoft has three more years to make Windows 11 (or whatever comes next) better at battery management. Have you noticed any difference in battery life after upgrading from Windows 10 to 11? Would you accept a slightly worse battery life for a fancy UI, animations, and new features? Share your thoughts in the comments. Is Windows 11 more energy efficient than Windows 10?
  5. With all eyes on Windows 11 and its first feature update, now available for download, you would be excused for thinking that Windows 10 is now a thing of the past. Still, even though Microsoft is steaming ahead with Windows 11, it is not done with the previous-gen operating system that turned seven two months ago. The company has buried a subtle reminder about the upcoming "feature update" for Windows 10 in a blog post describing how to download the Windows 11 2022 Update. Because Windows 11 contains some controversial feature changes, not every user with older, but still perfectly capable, hardware is ready to upgrade their computer just to get the newest operating system. Even Microsoft says that Windows 10 is "a great place to be" if your device is not eligible for Windows 11. To keep customers happy, Microsoft will keep servicing Windows 10 until October 2025. As a part of that servicing, the operating system will receive an upgrade next month. Unlike Windows 11, which is set to get a bunch of neat features in its first "moment" update in October, Windows 10 will most likely get a simple build version bump with a cumulative-like update. Still, some minor new features can make it to Windows 10, such as the slightly updated taskbar that now can display News and Interests regardless of where you set the taskbar. The latter is a somewhat odd change in light of Microsoft's recent claims that very few people position their taskbar on top or at the sides of the screen, which is one of the reasons Windows 11 does not allow you to change the position of the taskbar. Source: Microsoft Windows 10 22H2 is coming in October, Microsoft confirms
  6. The Windows 10 KB5017308 cumulative update released this Patch Tuesday is reportedly causing Group Policy Object (GPO) issues, according to admin reports. According to reports shared across multiple social networks and on Microsoft's online community, GPO file operations will no longer work as they can no longer create or copy shortcuts correctly after installing KB5017308. "Specifically, we copy a batch file into public\documents, then copy a shortcut to the current user's desktop to run it," one admin said on Reddit. "Since the update, the icons are not transferring over for the shortcut (i.e they are blank icons now) and the batch file is actually empty when copied over." Another one confirmed this issue on the Microsoft Community website, saying that all shortcuts created by GPO are "created empty with 0 bytes and no info where shortcut "leads" to." While Microsoft is yet to officially acknowledge the issue and provide a fix or a workaround, multiple Windows admins have reported that un-checking the "Run in user security context" option on the affected GPOs will address the shortcut creation problems. Installing the Windows 10 KB5017308 update (BleepingComputer) Others have also suggested a more radical fix that requires manually uninstalling and hiding the KB5017308 cumulative update. "To remove the LCU after installing the combined SSU and LCU package, use the DISM/Remove-Package command line option with the LCU package name as the argument. You can find the package name by using this command: DISM /online /get-packages," Microsoft says. "Running Windows Update Standalone Installer (wusa.exe) with the /uninstall switch on the combined package will not work because the combined package contains the SSU. You cannot remove the SSU from the system after installation." However, it's important to mention that, since Microsoft bundles all security fixes into a single update, removing KB5017308 may resolve the bug but will also remove all fixes for recently patched security vulnerabilities. KB5017308 also failing to install Another seemingly widespread problem encountered after deploying KB5017308 is affecting Windows 10 systems that will hang on reboot after installation with an 0x800F0845 added to the event log. "Ever since that update was downloaded the machine hangs on the required reboot after the install. I have disabled updates until I can find a fix. I've tried to download the update and install manually but get the same results," a user report reads. Those affected say that the automatic rollback will only trigger after rebooting the affected systems twice in a row. While downloading the update from the Microsoft Update Catalog and installing it manually usually fixes issues where the updates can't be deployed, users who tried it said that, in this case, they encountered the same reboot hang bug. The KB5017308 cumulative update was released on Tuesday to resolve bugs and address security vulnerabilities on systems running Windows 10 20H2, 21H1, and 21H2. This Windows 10 update is mandatory and will automatically be installed by Windows Update during the servicing window. H/T Günter Born Windows 10 KB5017308 causing issues with Group Policy settings
  7. Microsoft has released a new Windows 10 build, Build 19044.2075 (KB5017380) for Insiders on the Windows 10 Release Preview Channel. It adds the ability to view News and interests on the taskbar in any orientation, Transport Layer Security (TLS) 1.0 and 1.1 is now off by default in all apps and browsers by Microsoft, plus there's a good number of fixes, and more. For those paying attention, oddly enough this is still 21H2 being rolled out to Release Preview, while Windows 10 22H2 has still not gotten a release date. You can view the long list of changes below: This update includes the following improvements: New! We turned off Transport Layer Security (TLS) 1.0 and 1.1 by default in Microsoft browsers and applications. To learn more, see Plan for change: TLS 1.0 and TLS 1.1 soon to be disabled by default. New! We provided the ability to search for the controls for news and interests on the taskbar and modify them using the Settings app. To change your settings, navigate to Settings > Personalization > Taskbar > News and interests. Otherwise, right-click the taskbar and select Taskbar settings. New! We supported all taskbar orientations for news and interests. A top, left, or right taskbar now has features and settings much like the horizontal taskbar. New! We introduced WebAuthn redirection. It lets you authenticate in apps and on websites without a password when you use Remote Desktop. Then, you can use Windows Hello or security devices, such as Fast Identity Online 2.0 (FIDO2) keys. New! We introduced functionality that lets you use Azure Active Directory (AD) authentication to sign in to Windows using Remote Desktop. Then, you can use Windows Hello or security devices, such as Fast Identity Online 2.0 (FIDO2) keys, for remote sign in. It also enables the use of Conditional Access policies. We fixed an issue that requires you to reinstall an app if the Microsoft Store has not signed that app. This issue occurs after you upgrade to Windows 10 or a newer OS. We fixed an issue that prevents MSIX updates from installing from the same URL. We fixed an issue that stops codecs from being updated from the Microsoft Store. We fixed an issue that affects cached credentials for security keys and Fast Identity Online 2.0 (FIDO2) authentications. On hybrid domain-joined devices, the system removes these cached credentials. We fixed an issue that affects a network’s static IP. The issue causes the configuration of the static IP to be inconsistent. Because of this, NetworkAdapterConfiguration() fails sporadically. We fixed an issue that affects rendering in Desktop Window Manager (DWM). This issue might cause your device to stop responding in a virtual machine setting when you use certain video graphics drivers. We fixed a rare stop error that happens after you change the display mode and more than one display is in use. We fixed an issue that affects graphics drivers that use d3d9on12.dll. We fixed an issue that forces the IE mode tabs in a session to reload. We fixed an issue that affects URLs generated by JavaScript: URLs. These URLs do not work as expected when you add them to the Favorites menu in IE mode. We fixed an issue that affects window.open in IE mode. We fixed an issue that successfully opens a browser window in IE mode to display a PDF file. Later, browsing to another IE mode site within the same window fails. We introduced a Group Policy that enables and disables Microsoft HTML Application (MSHTA) files. We fixed an issue that affects the Microsoft Japanese input method editor (IME). Text reconversion fails when you use some third-party virtual desktops. We fixed an issue that affects the App-V client service. The service leaks memory when you delete App-V registry nodes. We fixed an issue that might change the default printer if the printer is a network printer. We fixed an issue that affects the ProjectionManager.StartProjectingAsync API. This issue stops some locales from connecting to Miracast Sinks. We fixed an issue that affects Group Policy Objects. Because of this, the system might stop working. We fixed an issue that affects Windows Defender Application Control (WDAC) path rules. This issue stops .msi and PowerShell scripts from running. We fixed an issue that might bypass MSHTML and ActiveX rules for WDAC. We fixed an issue that causes WDAC to log 3091 and 3092 events in audit mode. We fixed an issue that affects Windows Defender Application Control (WDAC). It stops WDAC from logging .NET Dynamic Code trust verification failures. We fixed an issue that affects WDAC policies. If you enable SecureLaunch on a device, WDAC policies will not apply to that device. We fixed an issue that occurs when a WDAC policy fails to load. The system logs that failure as an error, but the system should log the failure as a warning. We fixed an issue that affects non-Windows devices. It stops these devices from authenticating. This issue occurs when they connect to a Windows-based remote desktop and use a smart card to authenticate. We fixed an issue that occasionally causes explorer.exe to stop working when explorer.exe opens. We fixed an issue that affects the Microsoft Japanese IME when it is active and the IME mode is on. When you use the numeric keypad to insert a dash (-) character, the IME inserts the wrong one. We fixed an issue that affects the rendering of the search box. It does not render properly if you sign in using Table mode. We fixed an issue that affects the FindNextFileNameW() function. It might leak memory. We fixed an issue that affects robocopy. Robocopy fails to set a file to the right modified time when using the /IS option. We fixed an issue that affects cldflt.sys. A stop error occurs when it is used with Microsoft OneDrive. We fixed an issue that affects the LanmanWorkstation service. It leaks memory when you mount a network drive. 40366335 Risk Pending We fixed an issue that affects Roaming User Profiles. After you sign in or sign out, some of your settings are not restored. We fixed a known issue that affects XML Paper Specification (XPS) viewers. This might stop you from opening XPS files in some non-English languages. These include some Japanese and Chinese character encodings. This issue affects XPS and Open XPS (OXPS) files. We fixed a known issue that affects daylight saving time in Chile. This issue might affect the time and dates used for meetings, apps, tasks, services, transactions, and more. You can find the official blog post here. Windows 10 Release Preview adds support for all taskbar orientations with News and interests
  8. Microsoft has notified Windows 10 21H1 users that the operating system they keep using will soon bite the dust. The company plans to stop supporting all editions of Windows 10 21H1 on December 13, 2022. After that day, the OS will not receive any security updates or patches, forcing customers to opt for a newer release, such as 21H2 or Windows 11. Besides the mere fact that Windows 10 21H1 will soon reach its end of life, the notification means that Microsoft will most likely start force-updating customers to Windows 10 21H2 or newer. The company allows Windows users to stay on a preferred release as long as it remains supported, but the inevitable migration process kicks in automatically a few months before the end of life. According to the June 2022 report from AdDuplex, Windows 10 21H1 has about a 21% market share, so a big chunk of Windows users will soon have to update their operating system or watch Microsoft do it themselves. Customers should not be afraid of the upcoming update to a newer release. Version 21H2 contains no significant changes, and the migrating process will not differ from a standard monthly cumulative update. Hardware requirements are also unchanged, so apps and devices should continue working without hiccups. You can learn more about Windows 10 21H2 in our dedicated coverage. Of course, those with supported hardware can also jump straight to Windows 11. Microsoft will keep updating Windows 10 until October 14, 2025. In fact, Microsoft is currently preparing version 22H2, and you can upgrade to it right now if you want. Unfortunately, all the new features and software goodies are now exclusive to Windows 11, leaving its predecessor in a general maintenance state. Microsoft to kill Windows 10 version 21H1 in three months
  9. It's the second Tuesday of the month, which means it's Patch Tuesday time again. As such, today Microsoft is rolling out the monthly security update (also called "B release") for July 2022 on Windows Server 20H2, and Windows 10 for the latest versions, 21H1, 21H2. The new updates are being distributed under KB5017308, bumping up the builds to 19042.2006, 19043.2006, and 19044.2006. You can find standalone links to download the new update on Microsoft Update Catalog at this link here. The major highlight of the release is security updates for Windows 10 and as is generally the case, the Redmond company has also listed the known issues in the update, which is always handy. Here are the symptoms and their respective workarounds: Symptoms Workaround Devices with Windows installations created from custom offline media or custom ISO image might have Microsoft Edge Legacy removed by this update, but not automatically replaced by the new Microsoft Edge. This issue is only encountered when custom offline media or ISO images are created by slipstreaming this update into the image without having first installed the standalone servicing stack update (SSU) released March 29, 2021 or later. Note Devices that connect directly to Windows Update to receive updates are not affected. This includes devices using Windows Update for Business. Any device connecting to Windows Update should always receive the latest versions of the SSU and latest cumulative update (LCU) without any extra steps. To avoid this issue, be sure to first slipstream the SSU released March 29, 2021 or later into the custom offline media or ISO image before slipstreaming the LCU. To do this with the combined SSU and LCU packages now used for Windows 10, version 20H2 and Windows 10, version 2004, you will need to extract the SSU from the combined package. Use the following steps to extract the SSU: Extract the cab from the msu via this command line (using the package for KB5000842 as an example): expand Windows10.0-KB5000842-x64.msu /f:Windows10.0-KB5000842-x64.cab Extract the SSU from the previously extracted cab via this command line: expand Windows10.0-KB5000842-x64.cab /f:* You will then have the SSU cab, in this example named SSU-19041.903-x64.cab. Slipstream this file into your offline image first, then the LCU. If you have already encountered this issue by installing the OS using affected custom media, you can mitigate it by directly installing the new Microsoft Edge. If you need to broadly deploy the new Microsoft Edge for business, see Download and deploy Microsoft Edge for business. After installing this update, XPS Viewer might be unable to open XML Paper Specification (XPS) documents in some non-English languages, including some Japanese and Chinese character encodings. This issue affects both XML Paper Specification (XPS) and Open XML Paper Specification (OXPS) files. When encountering this issue, you may receive an error, "This page cannot be displayed" within XPS Viewer or it might stop responding and have high CPU usage with continually increasing memory usage. When the error is encountered, if XPS Viewer is not closed it might reach up to 2.5GB of memory usage before closing unexpectedly. This issue does not affect most home users. The XPS Viewer is no longer installed by default as of Windows 10, version 1803 and must be manually installed. We are working on a resolution and will provide an update in an upcoming release. Starting at 12:00 A.M. Saturday, September 10, 2022, the official time in Chile will advance 60 minutes in accordance with the August 9, 2022 official announcement by the Chilean government about a daylight saving time (DST) time zone change. This moves the DST change which was previously September 4 to September 10. Symptoms if the workaround is not used on devices between September 4, 2022 and September 11, 2022: Time shown in Windows and apps will not be correct. Apps and cloud services which use date and time for integral functions, such as Microsoft Teams and Microsoft Outlook, notifications and scheduling of meetings might be 60 minutes off. Automation that uses date and time, such as Scheduled tasks, might not run at the expected time. Timestamp on transactions, files, and logs will be 60 minutes off. Operations that rely on time-dependent protocols such as Kerberos might cause authentication failures when attempting to logon or access resources. Windows devices and apps outside of Chile might also be affected if they are connecting to servers or devices in Chile or if they are scheduling or attending meetings taking place in Chile from another location or time zone. Windows devices outside of Chile should not use the workaround, as it would change their local time on the device. To mitigate this issue, please see one of the following: Windows 10, version 21H2: Possible issues caused by new Daylight Savings Time in Chile Windows 10, version 21H1: Possible issues caused by new Daylight Savings Time in Chile Windows 10, version 20H2: Possible issues caused by new Daylight Savings Time in Chile We are working on a resolution and will provide an update in an upcoming release. Note We plan to release an update to support this change; however, there might be insufficient time to properly build, test, and release such an update before the change goes into effect. Please use the workaround above. The changelog for today is the same for Windows 10 version 22H2 as well. Here is a screenshot of winver for Windows 10 22H2 build 19045.2006 (KB5017308): Some of the older Windows 10 versions have also received updates today which have been listed below with their respective release notes (KB) linked as well as links to download them at Microsoft's Update Catalog: Version KB Build Download Support 1809 KB5017315 17763.3406 Update Catalog Long Term Servicing Channel (LTSC) 1607 KB5017305 14393.5356 Update Catalog 1507 KB5017327 10240.19444 Update Catalog It is noteworthy here that Windows 10 20H2 and Windows 10 1909 reached end of servicing. Also, while not Windows 10, Microsoft has also released updates for Windows Server 2022 under KB5017316. Meanwhile, Windows Server 20H2 reaches end of servicing today. Windows 10 September 2022 Patch Tuesday (KB5017308) out — here's what's new and what's broke
  10. Microsoft’s news algorithm leaves a lot to be desired. Here’s how to turn it off and reclaim that space. Do you like happiness? Or would you prefer to gaze deeply into the existential horror that is news headlines curated by algorithms? If you choose the second thing I don’t understand you, but good news: All you have to do is click the widget area on a Windows computer and you’ll be flooded with bad vibes. Here’s the bad news. As useful as the weather widget is, there’s no way to keep it and not see Microsoft’s demonic news curation. Hopefully, Microsoft will fix this—lots of people want to disable news—but until then, here’s how to disable the widget area and replace the weather feature. How to Hide Widgets (and Replace the Weather) The simplest thing to do is to disable the widget area entirely. On Windows 11 you can do this by right-clicking the taskbar, then clicking Taskbar Settings. From here you can disable widgets. Microsoft via Justin Pot On Windows 10 you need to right-click the taskbar, then click News and interests > Turn off. Now that the widget bar is disabled, you’ll need a new way to see the current temperature at a glance. I recommend Weather Bar, an open source application that lives in the system tray. Microsoft via Justin Pot You’ll notice a few things in this screenshot. First, the application shows the current temperature as a tray icon—but you can see an icon representing current conditions instead. Second, you’ll notice that I wrote this article during a bad heat wave, which Oregon really isn’t set up for but is becoming more routine. WeatherBar is the best weather app with a tray icon I found for Windows, but if it’s not to your liking, check out WeatherMate. This one dates back to 2005, but it’s a very lightweight tool for adding the temperature to your taskbar. Hide News in Microsoft Edge Microsoft via Justin Pot Annoying news content also shows up in the new tab page in Microsoft Edge (which is pretty good otherwise). You can mostly hide it by clicking the arrow beside the word Content visible, then clicking Headings only. This will obscure all headlines unless you scroll down. Alternatively, you could install Momentum, which will replace the new tab page in Edge with a pretty picture, a clock, and an inspirational quote. If that isn’t enough for you, you could just replace Edge with Chrome or Firefox. How to Block Topics (Sort Of) I’m going to be honest: I started off believing I could find some way to disable the news without disabling widgets. Wouldn’t that be neat? My first attempt was to open the Manage interests button, which opens a settings page on MSN.com in your browser. Microsoft via Justin Pot From here you can block topics. My idea was to block everything newsy. Microsoft via Justin Pot The problem is that blocking topics doesn’t seem to work. When I refresh the page, everything I’ve blocked is unblocked again. It’s maddening. I’m a little bitter because I thought I’d get to share a cool hack with all of you. Alas, Microsoft really wants to show me angry headlines about Nancy Pelosi. This whole widget thing is a huge mess, and I can’t believe one of the most valuable companies on earth not only intentionally created it but also stuck it on the Windows taskbar, which is easily some of the most valuable real estate in all of tech. At least it’s possible to turn it off (for now.) How to Hide the News Widgets in Windows 10 and 11 (May require free registration to view)
  11. It appears that Microsoft is getting ready to release Windows 10 22H2 soon. A new update, now available for manual download, switches Windows 10 21H2 (build number 19044.1862) to Windows 10 22H2 with build number 19045.1862. Although Microsoft is yet to announce the release (either in the Windows Insider program or straight in the stable channel), you can download the enablement package directly from Windows Update servers. All it takes to upgrade from Windows 10 21H2 to 22H2 is KB5015684, a tiny cumulative update weighing just 177KB. Like the previous "major" Windows 10 updates, 22H2 does not add new features or notable improvements. Besides the updated version and build numbers, Windows 10 22H2 is identical to its predecessor. This is not the first time Windows 10 22H2 appears before the official announcement. In June 2022, optional updates for Windows 10 confirmed that version 22H2 is coming. It was also possible to convert Windows 10 21H2 to version 22H2 with a few commands in PowerShell. Those staying away from Windows 11 can now download the latest Windows 10 release without any commands or software tricks. It is worth mentioning that the best and safest strategy is to wait for Microsoft to announce Windows 10 22H2 and get the OS via Windows Update. Still, if you are willing to take the risk, here are the direct links to KB5015684 (via Deskmodder). Before installing the update, ensure your system has the June 2022 cumulative updates (build 1904x.1806 or higher). KB 5015684 (CAB) - x86 | x64 | ARM64 KB 5015684 (MSU) - x86 | x64 | ARM64 To upgrade Windows 10 21H2 to 22H2, open the downloaded file, confirm installation, wait for the system to install, and then restart your computer. Here is how you can upgrade to Windows 10 22H2 right now
  12. Back in June last year when Microsoft announced Windows 11 for the first time, the company laid out the minimum system requirements for the new OS. At the time, such strict requirements caused a lot of commotion since even a couple of generations-old CPUs were deemed un-supported for Windows 11. And though the company later revised its compatible CPU list to add some more of Intel models, the other necessities like Trusted Platform Module (TPM) version 2.0 - or Platform Trust Technology (PTT) in the case of Intel -and Secure Boot remained unchanged. Some games too, like Valorant, were blocked on systems which did not have TPM 2.0 and Secure Boot so as to enfore anti-cheat measures. Microsoft later explained in detail how such technologies like TPM 2.0 and Virtualization-based Security (VBS) took the security aspect of Windows 11 to the next level, and also demonstrated successful hacker attack on a system with TPM and other such security features disabled. In case you are wondering when exactly the Redmond giant started adding in these requirements on Windows 10, Twitter user and prolific leakster Xeno spotted the change within the Build 21327 for the first time. This was available in the appraiserres.dll in the Windows 10 build 21327. Speaking of the appraiserres DLL file, there's a workaround available for bypassing the system requirements check on Windows 11 which basically involved deleting this file. Windows 11 TPM, Secure Boot requirements get unearthed in old Windows 10 build
  13. Microsoft has released a fresh cumulative non-security update for users sticking to one of the older Windows 10 versions. KB5016690 (build number 17763.3346) is now available for download on systems running Windows 10 2019 LTSC and Server 2019. Home and Pro users will not receive this update because Microsoft stopped supporting Windows 10 version 1809 in May 2021. The main highlight of KB5016690 is a fix for the bug causing an 0x1E error when users try to shut down or restart their systems. Here is the rest of the changelog containing more technical improvements and fixes: New! Enhances Microsoft Defender for Endpoint’s ability to identify and intercept ransomware and advanced attacks. Addresses an issue that causes ServerAssignedConfigurations to be null in a few full configuration scenarios. Addresses an issue that might generate error 0x1E when you shut down or restart a device. Addresses an issue that prevents virtualized App-V Microsoft Office applications from opening or causes them to stop working. Addresses an issue that leads to a false negative when you run scripts while Windows Defender Application Control (WDAC) is turned on. This might cause AppLocker events 8029, 8028, or 8037 to appear in the log when they should not. Addresses an issue that causes the Resultant Set of Policy tool (Rsop.msc) to stop working when it processes 1,000 or more “File System” security settings. Addresses an issue that causes the Settings app to stop working on server domain controllers (DCs) when accessing the Privacy > Activity history page. Addresses a race condition that causes the Local Security Authority Subsystem Service (LSASS) to stop working on Active Directory domain controllers. This issue occurs when LSASS processes simultaneous Lightweight Directory Access Protocol (LDAP) over Transport Layer Security (TLS) requests that fail to decrypt. The exception code is 0xc0000409 (STATUS_STACK_BUFFER_OVERRUN). Addresses an issue that affects a lookup for a nonexistent security ID (SID) from the local domain using read-only domain controller (RODC). The lookup unexpectedly returns the STATUS_TRUSTED_DOMAIN_FAILURE error instead of STATUS_NONE_MAPPED or STATUS_SOME_MAPPED. Addresses an issue that prevents a private virtual LAN (PVLAN) from providing tenant and virtual machine (VM) isolation. Addresses an issue that delays a client’s acquisition of the Internet Protocol version 6 (IPv6) address for extended periods in an IPv6 environment. Addresses an issue that might cause Remote Desktop Session licensing to display a 60-minute disconnection warning after reconnecting. Addresses an issue that causes a RODC to unexpectedly restart. In the event log, you’ll find the following: Event 1074 with the message, “The system process 'C:\Windows\system32\lsass.exe' terminated unexpectedly with status code -1073740286. The system will now shut down and restart.” Event 1015 with the message, “A critical system process, C:\Windows\system32\lsass.exe, failed with status code c0000602. The machine must now be restarted.” Event 1000 with the message, “Faulting application name: lsass.exe, Faulting module name: ESENT.dll, Exception code: 0xc0000602.” Addresses an issue that might cause cldflt.sys to reference invalid memory in race conditions. Users can download KB5016690 from Windows Update (in the optional updates section) or the Microsoft Update Catalog. It is worth noting that Windows 10 2019 LTSC Editions and Server 2019 will soon stop receiving non-security optional updates (C-releases). Starting September 20, 2022, only cumulative security updates (B-releases) or "Patch Tuesday" will be available. Microsoft fixes bug causing 0x1E error when shutting down Windows 10
  14. According to the latest update from Microsoft on the official Windows Health Dashboard website, KB5015878 causes all sorts of audio problems on systems running Windows 10. The company has officially acknowledged the problem, shared workarounds for the affected customers, and applied the Known Issue Rollback System (KIR) to prevent the bug from spreading. The software giant says the newest known bug in Windows 10 affects computers differently. Some users experience a complete audio blackout, while others only have audio on specific ports, devices, or applications. Microsoft's findings reveal that the affected audio drivers have the "audio enhancements" setting disabled before installing KB5015878, or the sound device driver has issues with the "audio enhancements" feature. To prevent the problem from spreading, Microsoft applied the Known Issue Rollback system that can undo problematic changes without any action required from the end user. Interestingly, this time, KIR only ensures the bug will not affect other systems. Those who already have audio issues on Windows 10 after installing KB5015878 should apply one of three workarounds described below: If you have not yet installed the update, you can do the following to prevent the issue: Updating your audio device driver (also called "sound drivers" or "sound card drivers") might prevent this issue. If there are updated drivers available on Windows Update or from your Windows device manufacturer's (OEM) webpage, installing them might prevent this issue. If you are using any advanced audio applications such as Open Broadcaster Software (OBS), it is recommended that you backup all your settings before installing the update. If only certain apps are impacted, you can try the following to mitigate the issue: Verify that the audio devices set within those apps are the expected devices. Audio endpoints might be reinitialized after KB5015878 is installed and some apps might set the audio devices for microphone and speakers to default. If the device settings within the app are as expected, the apps might be caching the Windows Multimedia Device (MMDevice) ID. Caching the MMDevice ID is not recommended and might require reinstallation of the affected app or contacting support for the developer of the app for how to resolve the issue when audio endpoints are reinitialized and have new MMDevice IDs. If you have already installed the update and are experiencing issues with audio on all apps, you can try the following to mitigate the issue: The Windows audio or sound troubleshooter might be able to resolve the issue for you. You can launch the troubleshooter from Fix sound or audio problems in Windows by selecting the Open Get Help button in the article. The Get Help dialog window should open, and you will need to select yes to open the troubleshooter. If your device's audio is still not working as expected, follow the instructions in Disable Audio Enhancements. Note: The article uses the microphone as an example, but you will need to do the steps for any affected audio device. The audio bug in KB5015878 affects only client Windows 10 versions 20H2, 21H1, and 21H2. It should not bother Windows 11 users, just like the recently confirmed BitLocker recovery bug does not affect Windows 10 customers. Microsoft shares workarounds for broken audio on Windows 10 after KB5015878
  15. Microsoft has released a new Windows 10 build, Build 19044.1947 (KB5016688) for Insiders on the Windows 10 Release Preview Channel. It adds the ability for IT admins to remotely add and manage languages, as well as improvements to Microsoft Defender for Endpoint, and more. For those paying attention, oddly enough this is still 21H2 being rolled out to Release Preview, while Windows 10 22H2 has still not gotten a release date. You can view the long list of changes below: This update includes the following improvements: New! We gave IT admins the ability to remotely add languages and language-related features. Additionally, they can now manage language scenarios across several endpoint managers. New! We enhanced Microsoft Defender for Endpoint’s ability to identify and intercept ransomware and advanced attacks. We fixed an issue that causes ServerAssignedConfigurations to be null in a few full configuration scenarios. We fixed a known issue that causes Microsoft Edge to stop responding when you use IE mode. This issue also prevents you from interacting with a dialog. We fixed an issue that affects transparency in layered windows when you are in High Definition remote applications integrated locally (RAIL) mode. We fixed an issue that might generate error 0x1E when you shut down or restart a device. We fixed an issue that causes a subscription activation to fail under certain conditions. We fixed an issue that might cause some game installations to fail because of a licensing issue. We fixed an issue that prevents virtualized App-V Microsoft Office applications from opening or causes them to stop working. We fixed an issue that might cause the deployment of the Windows Hello for Business certificate to fail in certain circumstances after you reset a device. We fixed an issue that degrades BitLocker performance. We fixed an issue that causes the Resultant Set of Policy tool (Rsop.msc) to stop working when it processes 1,000 or more “File System” security settings. We fixed an issue that continues to trust a revoked Attestation Identity Key (AIK) certificate and fails to generate a new certificate. We fixed an issue that causes the Take a Test app to remove all policies related to lockdown enforcement when you close the app. We fixed an issue that affects the jump list icon colors in the Search app. We fixed an issue that affects Focus Assist functionality for applications that run in full screen. We fixed an issue that prevents devices from receiving an offer from Windows Update for the same extension driver when that extension driver is already installed without the base driver. We fixed a race condition that causes the Local Security Authority Subsystem Service (LSASS) to stop working on Active Directory domain controllers. This issue occurs when LSASS processes simultaneous Lightweight Directory Access Protocol (LDAP) over Transport Layer Security (TLS) requests that fail to decrypt. The exception code is 0xc0000409 (STATUS_STACK_BUFFER_OVERRUN). We fixed an issue that affects a lookup for a nonexistent security ID (SID) from the local domain using read-only domain controller (RODC). The lookup unexpectedly returns the STATUS_TRUSTED_DOMAIN_FAILURE error instead of STATUS_NONE_MAPPED or STATUS_SOME_MAPPED. We fixed an issue that might cause cldflt.sys to reference invalid memory in race conditions. We fixed an issue that affects input and output in the Storport driver and might cause your system to stop responding. You can find the official blog post here. Windows 10 Release Preview Build 19044.1947 (KB5016688) adds language management, and more
  16. It's the second Tuesday of the month, which means it's Patch Tuesday time again. As such, today Microsoft is rolling out the monthly security update (also called "B release") for July 2022 on Windows Server 20H2, and Windows 10 for the latest versions, 21H1, 21H2. The new updates are being distributed under KB5016616, bumping up the builds to 19042.1889, 19043.1889, and 19044.1889. You can find standalone links to download the new update on Microsoft Update Catalog at this link here. Alongside security fixes, today's Patch Tuesday also brings quality improvements, including a fix for a printing issue: Highlights Addresses an issue that affects the printing of files you submit to a printer. Addresses a known issue that might prevent the Input Indicator and Language Bar from displaying in the notification area. This issue affects devices that have more than one language installed. Addresses security issues for your Windows operating system. The Redmond company has also listed the known issues in the update, which is always handy. Here are the symptoms and their respective workarounds: Symptoms Workaround Devices with Windows installations created from custom offline media or custom ISO image might have Microsoft Edge Legacy removed by this update, but not automatically replaced by the new Microsoft Edge. This issue is only encountered when custom offline media or ISO images are created by slipstreaming this update into the image without having first installed the standalone servicing stack update (SSU) released March 29, 2021 or later. Note Devices that connect directly to Windows Update to receive updates are not affected. This includes devices using Windows Update for Business. Any device connecting to Windows Update should always receive the latest versions of the SSU and latest cumulative update (LCU) without any extra steps. To avoid this issue, be sure to first slipstream the SSU released March 29, 2021 or later into the custom offline media or ISO image before slipstreaming the LCU. To do this with the combined SSU and LCU packages now used for Windows 10, version 20H2 and Windows 10, version 2004, you will need to extract the SSU from the combined package. Use the following steps to extract the SSU: Extract the cab from the msu via this command line (using the package for KB5000842 as an example): expand Windows10.0-KB5000842-x64.msu /f:Windows10.0-KB5000842-x64.cab Extract the SSU from the previously extracted cab via this command line: expand Windows10.0-KB5000842-x64.cab /f:* You will then have the SSU cab, in this example named SSU-19041.903-x64.cab. Slipstream this file into your offline image first, then the LCU. If you have already encountered this issue by installing the OS using affected custom media, you can mitigate it by directly installing the new Microsoft Edge. If you need to broadly deploy the new Microsoft Edge for business, see Download and deploy Microsoft Edge for business. After installing this update, IE mode tabs in Microsoft Edge might stop responding when a site displays a modal dialog box. A modal dialog box is a form or dialog box that requires the user to respond before continuing or interacting with other portions of the webpage or app. Developer Note Sites affected by this issue call window.focus. This issue is resolved using Known Issue Rollback (KIR). Please note that it might take up to 24 hours for the resolution to propagate automatically to consumer devices and non-managed business devices. Restarting your Windows device might help the resolution apply to your device faster. For enterprise-managed devices that have installed an affected update and encountered this issue can resolve it by installing and configuring the special Group Policy listed below. For information on deploying and configuring these special Group Policy, please see How to use Group Policy to deploy a Known Issue Rollback. Group Policy download with Group Policy name: Download for Windows 10, version 20H2 and Windows 10, version 21H1 - Windows 10 20H2, 21H1 and 21H2 KB5014023 220624_22551 Known Issue Rollback Important You will need to install and configure the Group Policy for your version of Windows to resolve this issue. Microsoft has received reports of issues affecting some printing devices following installation of this update. Symptoms observed may include duplicate copies of printers installed on a device (commonly with a similar name and the suffix "Copy1"), and applications which refer to the printer by a specific name cannot print. Normal printer usage might be interrupted, resulting in failure of printing operations. View the “Settings” app on your device. If a duplicate copy of a printer appears to exist under the “Bluetooth & devices” section, confirm whether this printer works. If so, this printer can be used normally, and other copies of the printer can be removed. If the issue persists, update the print driver for your device. For guidance, see Install the latest driver for your printer. If you are still having issues, uninstalling and reinstalling your printer should solve the issue. We are presently investigating a resolution and will provide an update when more information is available. Some of the older Windows 10 versions have also received updates today which have been listed below with their respective release notes (KB) linked as well as links to download them at Microsoft's Update Catalog: Version KB Build Download Support 1809 KB5016623 17763.3287 Update Catalog Long Term Servicing Channel (LTSC) 1607 KB5016622 14393.5291 Update Catalog 1507 KB5016639 10240.19387 Update Catalog It is noteworthy here that Windows 10 20H2 and Windows 10 1909 reached end of servicing. Also, while not Windows 10, Microsoft has also released updates for Windows Server 2022 under KB5016627. Meanwhile, Windows Server 20H2 reaches end of servicing today. Windows 10 August Patch Tuesday (KB5016616) out — here's what's new and what's broken
  17. Microsoft has notified Windows 10 and 11 users about a new known issue in the operating system. According to the Windows Health Dashboard documentation, Windows currently struggles with opening specific XPS documents (Microsoft's alternative to Adobe PDF, which has nothing to do with the Dell XPS lineup). Besides the inability to open XPS and OXPS documents in non-English languages, XPS Viewer stops responding and starts hogging CPU and RAM resources until it crashes upon reaching 2.5GB of RAM usage. After installing KB5014666 or later updates, XPS Viewer might be unable to open XML Paper Specification (XPS) documents in some non-English languages, including some Japanese and Chinese character encodings. This issue affects both XML Paper Specification (XPS) and Open XML Paper Specification (OXPS) files. When encountering this issue, you may receive an error, "This page cannot be displayed" within XPS Viewer or it might stop responding and have high CPU usage with continually increasing memory usage. When the error is encountered, if XPS Viewer is not closed it might reach up to 2.5GB of memory usage before closing unexpectedly. Microsoft says the problem originates from KB5014666 and KB5014666 (Windows 10 19044.1806 and Windows 11 22000.778), released on June 26 and 28. The company is busy investigating the bug and promises to release a fix in the upcoming releases. Unfortunately, there are no temporary workarounds. It is worth noting that the problem will not bother the vast majority of regular Windows 10 consumers. Apart from the fact that the XPS format failed to gain traction, Microsoft stopped bundling Windows 10 with XPS Viewer in version 1803. Still, you can install XPS Viewer as an optional Windows component in the Settings app. The broken XPS Viewer app is not the only known problem Microsoft is investigating. The company recently confirmed that Windows updates released after June 28 might cause issues with USB printers. Microsoft confirms problems with opening XPS documents in Windows 10 and 11
  18. Microsoft has confirmed that the next version of Windows 10 is "version 22H2," which is slated to start rolling out later this year as a feature update. Microsoft has already begun testing the new Windows 10 22H2 version in the Windows Insider Release preview channel, allowing both consumers and the enterprise to test its new feature before it is officially released. Windows 10 22H2 is not a significant release and does not bring a major overhaul to Windows 10, but Microsoft says this update comes with a scoped set of new features. In terms of hardware and driver requirements, there are absolutely no changes. In fact, your existing drivers, including those installed for Windows 10 version 2004, will continue to work normally on Windows 10 version 22H2. What's new in Windows 10 version 22H2 While Microsoft has released Windows 10 version 22H2 for testing, it has not released a list of new features other than saying it would have a scoped set of features. However, it is believed that any new features coming to Windows 10 will be more enterprise-centric, with few new features being added. However, from release notes seen for current versions of Windows 10, we can see that Microsoft continues to invest development time in improving existing features, such as Focus Assist and Windows Autopilot. For example, the recent KB5015878 update includes these new features: Gives you the option to receive important notifications when focus assist is on. Focus assist is like a do not disturb mode that hides notifications. Restores functionality for Windows Autopilot deployment scenarios that are affected by the security mitigation for hardware reuse. The company plans to release the feature update via an enablement package, similar to the previous Windows 10 releases. The enablement package is a "master switch" that would simply turn on dormant features. In other words, the features of Windows 10 version 22H2 are already included in Windows 10's latest cumulative updates. How to download version 22H2 The update is expected to roll out in October or November as an optional update for Windows 10. To get the update via enablement package or version 22H2, users should be using the latest cumulative updates. Once you've installed the cumulative updates, just go to Settings > Update & Security and begin the download by clicking the 'Download & install now" button. If you want to try it right now, you can join the Release Preview Channel and follow the above steps. Microsoft has also made the Windows 10 22H2 ISO available for download via the Windows Insider program for those who wish to perform a clean install. Windows 10 22H2 is coming, here's everything we know
  19. Pin-protected printing and more coming to Windows 10, after debuting in Windows 11. Microsoft is bringing pin-protected printing to its Windows 10 operating system - a feature that actually premiered on Windows 11. The tech giant has a “scoped set of features” that it plans to bring over from Windows 11 in order to make bridging over from Windows 10 more natural, which are due to be shared between the operating systems in the near future. In an effort to avoid duplicate printouts, especially in busy offices and workplaces, Windows 11 (and now Windows 10) users are able to set a pin on their computer. The file(s) will only be printed once this pin is inputted into the printer. Pin-protected printing on Windows 10 The move isn't just linked to increased security and privacy, but in an environmentally conscious age, it should also drive down paper waste. Enterprise customers are also getting a printing-related feature bridged over to Windows 10: the Print Support App is designed to support new features and for workplaces to print workflows to the print experience without needing to install additional drivers. Windows 11 users have also valued focus assist for the OS’s do not disturb mode, allowing users to continue to receive important, time-sensitive notifications irrespective of do not disturb status. The Windows 11 printing and do not disturb features are heading over to Windows 10 with build number 19044.1806, which is currently available for testing in the Release Preview Channel. Currently, there’s no word on when this build, which has been in testing since June this year, will become widely available, however you can check out the entire list of additions and fixes on the Windows blog site (opens in new tab). Via Windows Latest (opens in new tab) One of the most useful Windows 11 tools is coming to Windows 10
  20. Microsoft has notified Windows 10 users on the official Windows Health Dashboard website about a new issue the company had to fix using the Known Issue Rollback tool. According to the software giant, Windows 10 had problems displaying the input indicator and language bar in the notification area after installing the recent KB5014666 update: After installing updates released on June 28, 2022 (KB5014666) or later updates, the Input Indicator and Language Bar might not appear in the notification area. The notification area is normally located on the right end of the taskbar. Affected devices have more than one language installed. The Input Indicator and Language Bar is used to switch between input or keyboard languages on Windows devices and is used especially with languages that use Input Method Editors (IME). To fix the problem, Microsoft issued the Known Issue Rollback mechanism that automatically undoes troublesome changes in cumulative updates with no additional action required. Affected users can restart their Windows 10 computers to attempt to apply the rollback faster. On the other hand, Enterprise users need to install a special Group Policy rule that allows Microsoft to fix bugs using Known Issue Rollback. Microsoft has dedicated documentation on the official website about using Group Policy to deploy a Known Issue Rollback. Microsoft says the bug affects Windows 10 client versions 21H2, 21H1, 20H2, and Windows Server 20H2. Windows 11 users and customers using only one input language, are not affected. Besides breaking the input indicator, KB5014666 fixed multiple bugs in Windows 10 and introduced several new printing-related features. You can learn more about the update in our dedicated article. Microsoft issues fix for broken input indicator and language bar on Windows 10
  21. Microsoft has addressed a known issue triggered by recent Windows 10 updates that caused the Input Indicator and Language Bar not to appear in the notification area. This known issue affects devices running Windows 10 version 20H2, 21H1, and 21H2, with more than one language installed. "After installing updates released on June 28, 2022 ( KB5014666) or later updates, the Input Indicator and Language Bar might not appear in the notification area," Redmond explained on the Windows health dashboard on Tuesday. "The Input Indicator and Language Bar is used to switch between input or keyboard languages on Windows devices and is used especially with languages that use Input Method Editors (IME)." Microsoft addressed the issue using the Known Issue Rollback (KIR) Windows capability that helps revert buggy non-security fixes delivered via Windows Update. Fixes pushed through KIR should reach all consumer and non-managed business devices within 24 hours, with users having the option to speed up the rollout by restarting impacted Windows 10 devices. Group policies for enterprise customers To resolve this known issue on enterprise-managed devices, IT admins must install and configure a specific KIR Group Policy associated with the systems' Windows version. You can find this Group Policy in Computer Configuration -> Administrative Templates -> KB5014666 220706_033027 Known Issue Rollback. The steps needed to deploy a Known Issue Rollback via Group Policy require navigating to the Local Computer Policy or the Domain policy on the domain controller using the Group Policy Editor to select the Windows version to target. You can download the Known Issue Rollback Group Policy for affected Windows 10 versions from here. Detailed information on how to deploy and configure KIR Group Policies can be found on Microsoft's support website. Last month, Microsoft addressed another known issue via KIR that was causing the start menu on some Windows 11 to stop opening after installing recent updates. Microsoft rolling out fix for Windows 10 language bar issues
  22. Last month, we found out that Windows 10 version 22H2 is indeed on the way. Shortly after, the update landed in the Release Preview Channel and you can follow this guide to install it as well. It's unclear if Windows 10 version 22H2 brings any new features because right now, it's just an enablement package that bumps the build number. So there's really no major benefit to installing it. That said, Microsoft has confirmed two things recently. In a recently updated blog post (spotted by Thurrott.com), the company has noted that the upcoming version of Windows 10 has a "scoped" set of features and Microsoft will share more details about it later this year. So while we do know that new features will eventually arrive, we don't know exactly what they will be. Meanwhile, another blog post intended to help commercial customers and companies in Windows 10 deployments has explicitly noted that there are no changes in the Windows Hardware Compatibility Program (WHCP) for version 22H2. All the requirements are exactly the same as Windows 10, version 2004. That said, this is not really surprising since WHCP guidelines have remained static for the past few versions of Windows 10. You can find more details quoted below: WHCP requirements – No change. Windows 10, version 2004 requirements remain applicable for Windows 10, version 22H2. Windows Hardware Lab Kit – No change. Since WHCP requirements will persist in Windows 10, version 22H2, the Windows Hardware Lab Kit (Windows HLK) will also remain the same. There will not be a new Windows HLK release for Windows 10, version 22H2 and partners can continue using Windows 10, version 2004 HLK for certification. Errata – No change. All Windows 10, version 2004 errata will continue to be valid for Windows 10, version 22H2. Windows HLK playlist – No change. The Windows HLK version 2004 playlist can be used for Windows 10, version 22H2. Driver signature – No change. Drivers that meet all the applicable Windows 10, version 2004 requirements will be digitally signed with the same signature attributes. Submission – No change. Windows 10, versions 2004, 20H2, and 21H1 can be used for WHCP submission. WHCP qualification – Windows 10, version 2004 Required OS version – Windows 10, version 22H2 HLK version – HLK version 2004 All in all, Windows 10 version 22H2 is available to install right now but it's unclear what features will be eventually lit up in it. Microsoft will share more details on this front in the coming months. It is also important to note that Windows 10 is supported until 2025, but it seems like development efforts will be more concentrated towards Windows 11. Microsoft suggests new features will be coming to Windows 10 version 22H2
  23. Microsoft has officially flipped the switch on Windows 10 22H2, it is now available to download in the form of a Cumulative Update through the Release Preview Channel for Windows Insiders, incidentally, that's the only Windows Insider channel available for Windows 10 users as well. Microsoft did not provide a changelog, mainly because all this update provides is the enablement package to change the version from 21H2 to 22H2. It is a slight bump in build number from KB5015684 (19045.1862), which is publicly available to download from Microsoft and does the same thing, to today's 19045.1865 (KB5015878) Release Preview build. Yes, you saw correctly, even non Insiders can upgrade to Windows 10 22H2 right now if they want, because all you have to do is download the KB5015684 enablement package, you can view the full details on how to do that here. Microsoft says that this build is being offered in the "seeker" experience, however being enrolled into the Release Preview Channel means you will get it offered via Windows Update automatically: this build [is] available to any Windows Insider in the Release Preview Channel via [the] “seeker” experience in Windows Update. This means Insiders currently in the Release Preview Channel can go to Settings and Windows Update and choose to download and install Windows 10, version 22H2 if they want. You can find the official blog post here. Windows 10 22H2 arrives in Release Preview Channel for Windows Insiders
  24. Microsoft has released the optional KB5015878 Preview cumulative update for Windows 10 20H2, Windows 10 21H1, and Windows 10 21H2. This update includes numerous bug fixes and enhancements, including gaming and Windows Autopilot fixes and a new Focus Assist feature. The KB5015878 cumulative update preview is part of Microsoft's July 2022 monthly "C" update, allowing admins to test upcoming fixes released in the August 2022 Patch Tuesday. Unlike Patch Tuesday cumulative updates, the "C" preview updates are optional and do not include security updates. However, If you run a Windows Insider build, the preview update will be installed automatically. Windows users can install this update by going into Settings, clicking on Windows Update, and manually performing a 'Check for Updates.' As this is an optional update, you will be asked whether you wish to install it by clicking on the 'Download and install' link, as shown in the image below. Windows 10 KB5015878 cumulative update previewSource: BleepingComputer Windows 10 users can also manually download and install the KB5015878 preview update from the Microsoft Update Catalog. What's new in Windows 10 KB5015878 With this update, Microsoft has highlighted sixteen improvements, including a new focus assist feature, a Windows Autopilot fix, and fixes for video and audio playback in games. Focus Assist is a do-not-disturb feature that hides distracting notifications from apps and Windows. With this update, Microsoft is adding a new feature that allows you to receive important notifications when Focus Assist is enabled. This update also removes a Windows Autopilot provisioning restriction added by Microsoft as part of the June 2022 Patch Tuesday updates, when a vulnerability tracked as ' CVE-2022-30189 - Windows Autopilot Device Management and Enrollment Client Spoofing Vulnerability' was fixed. In addition to the Focus Assist and Windows Autopilot changes, the Windows 10 KB5015878 cumulative update preview includes sixteen other improvements or fixes, with the six other highlighted ones listed below: Addresses an issue that causes certain docking stations to lose internet connectivity when waking from Sleep mode. Adds functionality that improves the OS upgrade experience. Addresses an issue that might cause consecutive video clip playback to fail in games that use DX12. Addresses an issue that affects certain games that use the XAudio API to play sound effects. Addresses an issue that affects the height of the Search box when you use multiple monitors that have different resolutions. Addresses an issue that prevents certain troubleshooting tools from opening. After installing this update, Windows 10 20H2 will be updated to build 19042.1865, Windows 10 21H1 will be updated to build 19043.1865, and Windows 10 21H2 will be updated to build 19044.1865. In addition to Windows fixes, the KB5015878 cumulative update also upgrades the Windows 10 servicing stack, which is used to install Windows updates as they become available. These improvements are meant to make it easier to install new updates and resolve known conflicts. You can find a complete list of fixes in the KB5015878 support bulletin. Windows 10 KB5015878 update released with gaming fixes
  25. Microsoft has confirmed that KB5014666, released on June 28, 2022 (the one adding several new printing features), causes printing issues on systems with Windows 10. According to the company, the bug causes Windows 10 to display duplicates of a single printer with a "Copy1" suffix. More importantly, applications referring to a specific printer by name cannot print a document. The software giant says it is working on fixing the problem in a future update, and, meanwhile, users can file a feedback report and try temporary workarounds: Open the Settings app, navigate to “Bluetooth & devices”, and select “Printers & scanners” If there appears to be a duplicate installation of an existing printer, such as with suffix "Copy1", confirm if printing works for this printer. This printer should operate as expected. If there is a need to use the original printer installation and not the duplicate, right-click the duplicate printer, select "Printer properties" and select the "Ports" tab. Observe the port in use. Open "Printer properties" on the original printer and select the "Ports" tab. From the list displayed, select the port option in use by the duplicate printer. If this original printer works normally, the duplicate copy printer can be removed. If the steps above do not restore the broken printing capabilities, Microsoft recommends attempting the following: Update the print driver for your device. For guidance, see Install the latest driver for your printer. If you already have the latest driver, consult the printer Manufacturer’s web site for any device firmware updates. If you are still having issues, uninstalling and reinstalling your printer might help. Turn off your printer and disconnect any cables. Open the Settings app, navigate to “Bluetooth & devices”, and select “Printers & scanners.” Select the affected printer and select the "Remove Device" option. Restart your device. Turn on your printer and reconnect it to your device. According to the Windows Health Dashboard, the new printing bug affects only Windows 10 21H2, 21H1, and 20H2 (including Windows Server). On the Windows 11 side, Microsoft recently confirmed problems with the Start menu after the updates the company released on June 23, 2022. Microsoft confirms Windows 10 updates break USB printers
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