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Facebook faces year of reckoning after showdown in Australia


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(FILES) This file photo taken on October 23, 2019 shows a giant digital sign at Facebook's corporate headquarters campus in Menlo Park, California. - Facebook said on February 23, 2021 it will lift a contentious ban on Australian news pages

 

 


With the prospect of more assertive regulation and even Apple questioning Facebook’s longstanding model of using data to better target advertising, the social media platform’s way of doing business faces being upended


Facebook Inc.’s brief but tempestuous standoff with the Australian government over a world-first pay-for-news law is only the start of a string of regulatory battles that the world’s biggest social network faces in 2021.

 

Mark Zuckerberg started the year on the offensive, blocking news across Rupert Murdoch’s home turf of Australia to fend off demands that Facebook pay media companies for content shared on its platform.

 

On Tuesday, Zuckerberg struck a compromise after 11th-hour talks with the government on the legislation that’s also aimed at Google and is expected to pass Australia’s parliament this week. But a regulatory domino effect is already underway, with publishers pressuring the European Union to emulate Australia’s approach.

 

With the prospect of more assertive regulation and even Apple Inc. questioning Facebook’s longstanding model of using data to better target advertising, the social media platform’s way of doing business faces being upended.

 

U.S. legislators are voicing the loudest concerns about Facebook, with Rhode Island Congressman and Antitrust Subcommittee Chairman David Cicilline tweeting that the company “is not compatible with democracy." Congress is holding hearings this week to consider tougher antitrust measures to rein in the powers of the company and other tech giants.

 

Australia’s Prime Minister Scott Morrison, meanwhile, said he’s discussed Facebook with Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi, Canadian leader Justin Trudeau, French President Emmanuel Macron and the U.K.’s Boris Johnson, whose government plans to conduct antitrust probes into its operations.

 

Facebook’s Australia Face-Off Could Backfire Across the Globe

 

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I for one hope fakebook get shut down its become a forum for noything but HATE and adds

Suckabuck is not the worlds owner like he thinks he is  he needs to be brought down

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Facebook will survive this wave. Governments for various reasons uses facebook for their advantage they will try to downsize Zuckerberg because he streched beyound his allowed space. But they will never sacrifiese this source of information.

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