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Xbox controllers still use AA batteries because of a long-standing agreement with Duracell


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Xbox controllers still use AA batteries because of a long-standing agreement with Duracell

The Duracell-branded Xbox One controller from 2018 totally makes sense now

 

2021-01-07-image-17-j.webp

 

WTF?! When practically everything has a built-in rechargeable battery these days, it is somewhat odd that the Xbox Series X|S controllers are powered by two AA batteries. Microsoft does have an Xbox rechargeable battery pack users can buy separately, and the Xbox Elite Wireless 2 sports an internal power cell. However, the standard gamepads have come with replaceable batteries since going wireless with the Xbox 360. Why?

 

According to remarks made in a recent interview with a Duracell executive, Xbox controllers always come with replaceable batteries due to a long-term deal between Microsoft and the "Copper-Top" company. Duracell UK's Marketing Manager Luke Anderson told Stealth Optional that "there's always been this partnership with Duracell and Xbox."

 

Essentially, Duracell has agreed to provide Xbox with batteries indefinitely, presumably for the exposure it provides. The idea is that when players replace the controller's batteries, they are much more likely to replace them with the same brand. But the agreement goes beyond the controllers.

"[The deal is] for [Duracell] OEM to supply the battery product for the Xbox consoles and also the controllers' battery," said Anderson.

 

He added that this agreement has been going on for "a while" and will continue for the foreseeable future. It seems a strange claim that Microsoft would allow itself to be strapped into a long-term deal like this, considering all of its competitors use internal rechargeable batteries.

Tag the person you love deeply, trust fully, and play @Xbox games with constantly. #XboxElite pic.twitter.com/zcYbI2haYQ

— Duracell (@Duracell) November 9, 2018

MCV Develop reached out to Microsoft for an explanation and received the following statement:

"We intentionally offer consumers choice in their battery solutions for our standard Xbox Wireless Controllers. This includes the use of AA batteries from any brand, the Xbox Rechargeable Battery, charging solutions from our partners, or a USB-C cable, which can power the controller when plugged into the console or PC."

Microsoft's statement indicates that its decision to use AA batteries was "intentional," rather than being dictated by some deal. However, when pressed further, the spokesperson would not confirm or deny whether the company had or has an agreement with Duracell.

 

However, all the evidence points to a partnership existing. Aside from Anderson's claims and Duracell double-As being the default choice in Xbox controllers, the two companies have cross-promoted on multiple occasions, including an Duracell-branded Xbox controller and the "marriage proposal" tweet from the Copper Top's official Twitter account (above).

 

 

Source: Xbox controllers still use AA batteries because of a long-standing agreement with Duracell

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They are better than playstation controllers. you can change AA batteries in 10 seconds while you will have to wait hours for the playstation controller to recharge.

 

my PC mouse is also using AA batteries that last 2 years. Logitech. no one is complaining.

 

 

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Microsoft debunks rumors of being forced to use Duracell batteries in Xbox controllers

 

Microsoft uses Duracell's AA batteries in its wireless Xbox controllers, and has been doing so for quite some time. The companies have also appeared in marketing material together, and there has been some criticism aimed at the Redmond tech giant from time to time about this solution. Recently, a rumor made the headlines that the firm sports AA Duracell batteries as the charging solution with Xbox controllers only because it is forced to do so as part of a long-running agreement between the two. Now, Microsoft has debunked this report.

 

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The original report comes from Stealth Optional, which cited Duracell's UK marketing manager Luke Anderson as saying that the partnership between the two firms is "a constant agreement". He reportedly also went on to say that:

[The deal is] for OEM to supply the battery product for the Xbox consoles and also the controllers’ battery. So that [deal is] going to go on for a while… it’s been going on for a while and I think it needs to go for a while [more].

In response to this statement, Microsoft strongly denied the allegation, telling Eurogamer that:

We intentionally offer consumers choice in their battery solutions for our standard Xbox Wireless Controllers. This includes the use of AA batteries from any brand, the Xbox Rechargeable Battery, charging solutions from our partners, or a USB-C cable, which can power the controller when plugged in to the console or PC.

Based on the strong wording, it appears that Microsoft has put this theory to rest once and for all. The company may engage with Duracell in the context of promotional material and including its AA batteries in its Xbox controllers, it definitely is not forced to do so, and in fact recommends the use of AA batteries from "any brand".

Source: Eurogamer

 

 

Source: Microsoft debunks rumors of being forced to use Duracell batteries in Xbox controllers

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