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How Can a Star Be Older Than the Universe?


SwissMiss
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The answer is simple, the star was in some other Universe before our our Universe was built.

Its just a case of reusing already present material like recycling or upscaling.

Whoever built our Universe may have taken some parts from some other places.

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31 minutes ago, Jogs said:

The answer is simple, the star was in some other Universe before our our Universe was built.

 

The Milky Way consumes its smaller neighbors so the Methuselah star might have been from a dwarf galaxy that the Milky Way consumed.  Hopefully, we will learn more interesting things about our universe and Methuselah in the future. :)

Edited by SwissMiss
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Sounds like an apology to the 'error bars'.

Having no clue about how things are/were measured, comments like "the scientists posed a residual uncertainty of 800 million years", "the conflict can only be resolved by pushing the error bars to their extreme limits" sound weird in this livescience article, as if the error bars were adjusted to avoid troubles. AFAIK error bars come directly from the measurements, there should be no such suggestions as posing/pushing/manipulating(?) them.

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3 minutes ago, mp68terr said:

Sounds like an apology to the 'error bars'.

Having no clue about how things are/were measured, comments like "the scientists posed a residual uncertainty of 800 million years", "the conflict can only be resolved by pushing the error bars to their extreme limits" sound weird in this livescience article, as if the error bars were adjusted to avoid troubles. AFAIK error bars come directly from the measurements, there should be no such suggestions as posing/pushing/manipulating(?) them.

What are you talking about got a link for that in English? :P

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4 minutes ago, steven36 said:

What are you talking about got a link for that in English? :P

Sorry, no specific link but we can likely rely on the wikipedia page (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Error_bar).

Error bars come from the data, to reflect the error/uncertainty/variability of these data.

No plan to read the original article(s), will likely not understand them. Those who can understand them will likely see that there was no manipulation from the authors. Suggesting the opposite has no place in a science-related article.

Or it could be my English and my interpretation of the OP article 😉

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2 hours ago, SwissMiss said:

A 2014 follow-up study updated the star's age to 14.27 billion years.

 

The 2014 study is linked directly to the article and is available as a PDF in English.  It sets forth the methodology, including the error bars that were used.  The article acknowledges the error bars.  It does not state that they were manipulated.

 

2 hours ago, SwissMiss said:

"The conclusion reached was that the age is about 14 billion years and, again, if one includes all sources of uncertainty — both in the observational measurements and the theoretical modelling — the error is about 700 or 800 million years, so there is no conflict because 13.8 billion years lies within the star's error bar," Bond said.

 

The quote above acknowledges that there is an error but there is no conflict.  Again, the article does not state that anything was manipulated nor does the study.

 

Finally, it should be noted that scientists are still trying to figure out why the universe appears younger than Methuselah.  Again, that does not mean that data or error bars were manipulated.

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A star older than the universe?.....Madonna?:w00t::w00t::w00t:

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It is Thanos fault that brought chaos to the universe. Now after he's been defeated hopefully universe will be a perfect harmony.

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" If the universe is 13.8 billion years old, how can a star be more than 14 billion years old? "

 

As Einstein would say "everything is relative".  According to Relativity, time is not a constant.  A stronger a gravity field will make time pass slower than a weaker gravity field.  This is why the GPS satellites orbiting the Earth have their clocks ticking a little faster to compensate for a weaker gravity in being in outer space.  The star which is 200 million years older than the universe happens to be in a place where gravity is weaker, therefore time for this star will tick a little faster than the rest of the universe.

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