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[Science] Ancient DNA testing solves 100-year-old controversy in Southeast Asian prehistory


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Southeast Asia is one of the most genetically diverse regions in the world, but for more than 100 years scientists have disagreed about which theory of the origins of the population of the area was correct.

 

 

One theory believed the indigenous Hòabìnhian hunter-gatherers who populated Southeast Asia from 44,000 years ago adopted agricultural practices independently, without the input from early farmers from East Asia. Another theory, referred to as the 'two-layer model' favours the view that migrating rice farmers from what is now China replaced the indigenous Hòabìnhian hunter-gatherers.

 

Academics from around the world collaborated on new research just published in Science which found that neither theory is completely accurate. Their study discovered that present-day Southeast Asian populations derive ancestry from at least four ancient populations.

 

DNA from human skeletal remains from Malaysia, Thailand, the Philippines, Vietnam, Indonesia, Laos and Japan dating back as far as 8,000 years ago was extracted for the study—scientists had previously only been successful in sequencing 4,000-year-old samples from the region. The samples also included DNA from Hòabìnhian hunter-gatherers and a Jomon from Japan—a scientific first, revealing a long suspected genetic link between the two populations.

 

In total, 26 ancient human genome sequences were studied by the group and they were compared with modern DNA samples from people living in Southeast Asia today.

 

The pioneering research is particularly impressive because the heat and humidity of Southeast Asia means it is one of the most difficult environments for DNA preservation, posing huge challenges for scientists.

 

Professor Eske Willerslev, who holds positions both at St John's College, University of Cambridge, and the University of Copenhagen, led the international study.

 

He explained: "We put a huge amount of effort into retrieving ancient DNA from tropical Southeast Asia that could shed new light on this area of rich human genetics. The fact that we were able to obtain 26 human genomes and shed light on the incredible genetic richness of the groups in the region today is astonishing."

 

Hugh McColl, Ph.D. student at the Centre for GeoGenetics in the Natural History Museum of Denmark of the University of Copenhagen, and one of the lead authors on the paper, said: "By sequencing 26 ancient human genomes—25 from South East Asia, one Japanese J?mon—we have shown that neither interpretation fits the complexity of Southeast Asian history. Both Hòabìnhian hunter-gatherers and East Asian farmers contributed to current Southeast Asian diversity, with further migrations affecting islands in South East Asia and Vietnam. Our results help resolve one of the long-standing controversies in Southeast Asian prehistory."

 

Dr. Fernando Racimo, Assistant Professor at the Centre for GeoGenetics in the Natural History Museum of the University of Copenhagen, the other lead author, said: "The human occupation history of Southeast Asia remains heavily debated. Our research spanned from the Hòabìnhian to the Iron Age and found that present-day Southeast Asian populations derive ancestry from at least four ancient populations. This is a far more complex model than previously thought."

 

Some of the samples used in the two and a half year study were from The Duckworth Collection, University of Cambridge, which is one of the world's largest repositories of human remains. Professor Marta Mirazón Lahr, Director of the Duckworth Laboratory and one of the authors on the paper, said: "This study tackles a major question in the origins of the diversity of Southeast Asian people, as well as on the ancient relationships between distant populations, such as Jomon and Hòabìnhian foragers, before farming. The fact that we are learning so much from ancient genomes, such as the one from Gua Cha, highlights the importance of amazing collections such as the Duckworth."

 

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Well, the people that live in South American in the XV Century, were really good and healthy. But then, when the FUC***N Spanish Pirates came to conquer, they make that the next generation had a really different genetically combinations... :( 

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52 minutes ago, Archanus said:

people that live in South American in the XV Century

The article has nothing to do with them.

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PEOPLE, let's get on POINT HERE? Nothing about non asian topics..

That is not the subject of this study

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On 7/6/2018 at 4:15 PM, Archanus said:

Well, the people that live in South American in the XV Century, were really good and healthy. But then, when the FUC***N Spanish Pirates came to conquer, they make that the next generation had a really different genetically combinations... :( 

 

Actually, the problem of native Americans was not the genetic combination with the Spanish conquerors but the lack of immunity against some of the most common diseases of European poblation. Aztecs, mayas and quechuas were not exterminated by spaniards but by the germs they brought.  Reciproclly, though not fully proved, apparently syphilis was carried back to Europa by these same conqueroros.

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Southeast Asia or Southeastern Asia is a subregion of Asia, consisting of the countries that are geographically south of China, east of India, west of New Guinea and north of Australia.[4] Southeast Asia is bordered to the north by East Asia, to the west by South Asia and Bay of Bengal, to the east by Oceania and Pacific Ocean, and to the south by Australia and Indian Ocean. 

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Posts that having non English have been removed.

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Let' just leave this thread as Is ..  It just confirms why  the existing tribes of Badjao in Mindanao, the Igorots of Central Luzon , the Ilongots of of the Cordilleras, the Lumads of Cebu, the Mangyans of Mindoro, Palawan at the Tumadoks of the Visayan Isles.. are related to their brothers in Vietnam, Laos, Cambodia, Thailand, Myanmar, Malaysia. Andaman and Nicobar Islands of India, Indonesia, East Malaysia, Singapore, , East Timor, Brunei, Christmas Island, and the Cocos (Keeling) Islands. Taiwan. We were taugh in FILIPINO HISTORY that Land bridges link mush of what is known as ASIA and Australia in ancient times..

 

Also happy that Philippines' famous Banaue Rice Terraces which features our native AETA tribe was mentioned in the OP's study above was featured the as Vengers Infinity War's ending. The existence of Rice Terraces in other countries makes it more meaningful we share the same ability to create WONDERS OF THE WORLD

 

This is a research that UNITES US not divides us..

***

 

if we want to discuss the contibutions of inter-marrraiges of races  on the the DNA mix of contemporary humans in our respective countries.. Lets put it in another thread

***

 

A sidenote the occupation of the Philippines by Spain, United States have given some of my people's good genes..

Some cool Caucasian and not your typical filipino 'insulares' features.. Mestizos as they are called are considered a good quality favored by  our entertainment  Industry.. ex Pia Wurtzbach, Miss Universe 2015,  Liza Soberano who top a recent  'most beautiful faces of the world ' list 

http://cnnphilippines.com/entertainment/2017/12/28/liza-soberano-beautiful-face.html 

 

 

Please close the thead

 

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