Jump to content

Microsoft is reportedly talking about buying GitHub, a platform for software developers last valued at $2 billion


tao

Recommended Posts

  • Microsoft recently held talks to acquire software developer platform GitHub.
  • The talks have come amid GitHub's struggle to replace CEO and founder Chris Wanstrath, who stepped down 10 months ago.
  • GitHub was last valued at $2 billion in 2015, but the price tag for an acquisition could be $5 billion or more.

Microsoft held talks in the past few weeks to acquire software developer platform GitHub, Business Insider reports.

 

One person familiar with the discussions between the companies told CNBC that they had been considering a joint marketing partnership valued around $35 million, and that those discussions had progressed to a possible investment or outright acquisition. It is unclear whether talks are still ongoing, but this person said that GitHub's price for a full acquisition was more than Microsoft currently wanted to pay.

 

GitHub was last valued at $2 billion in its last funding round 2015, but the price tag for an acquisition could be $5 billion or more, based on a price that was floated last year.

 

GitHub's tools have become essential to software developers, who use it to store code, keep track of updates and discuss issues. The privately held company has more than 23 million individual users in more than 1.5 million organizations. It was on track to book more than $200 million in subscription revenue, including more than $110 million from companies using its enterprise product, GitHub told CNBC last fall.

 

Microsoft has reportedly flirted with buying GitHub in the past, including in 2016, although GitHub denied those reports. A partnership would give Microsoft another connection point to the developers it needs to court to build applications on its various platforms, including the Azure cloud. Microsoft could also use data from GitHub to improve its artificial intelligence producs.

 

The talks come amid GitHub's struggle to replace CEO and founder Chris Wanstrath, who stepped down 10 months ago. Business Insider reported that Microsoft exec Nat Friedman -- who previously ran Xamarin, a developer tools start-up that Microsoft acquired in 2016 -- may take that CEO role. Google's senior VP of ads and commerce, Sridhar Ramaswamy, has also been in discussions for the job, says the report.

 

Microsoft declined to comment on the report. GitHub did not immediately return a request for comment.

 

< Here >

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Replies 21
  • Views 1.6k
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Lol they be better off building there own than buying that site in the long run you watch and see if they buy it . Most projects there leave as soon as they find new hosting and if M$ buys it the rest will leave and go to bit bucket, gitlab and others,  just like they did Sourceforge for installing malware because github is a resource hungry site that's closed source.That's the only reason why they have the projects they have is because they left Sourceforge.  Already the Linux community is talking about there departure from there if M$ buys it. :lol:

 

Quote

 

I find it interesting how people can read that and come away thinking GitHub support open source...

I most often see that artical posted as evidicent of that git hub is a net negative for Open Source

They are Vultures, they see Open Source and Free Software not as a ethical goal, or a philosophy but as a marketing tool

In that respect MS and GitHub would be a good match as MS does not believe in the Free Software philosophy, they see it as a marketing tool as well

Both are Vultures that will use Open Source to extract as much money from Developers and Projects as possible then toss the shredded carcass once they have devoured all the meat from the bone

Neither are good for Free Software

 

 

They would be helping out the Linux community by waking them up to what that site is all about. to profit off open source. :dance:

 

The 1st people on the www  they remember how M$ really was when they were a monopoly before they got sued into changing  by the time i came along it was over and the old time Linux users want use windows out of  principal but once they came out with Windows 10 i started understanding why they don't like M$ and became a foss user myself. 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Dean213

Microsoft reportedly agrees to acquire GitHub

The website is popular for storing and sharing software code.

 

ea080a1fa8d62879677d8811eeb7c56a

Source

 

Microsoft has agreed to acquire GitHub, a website where people can store and share software code, Bloomberg reported Sunday.

 

A purchase price wasn't revealed, but GitHub was last valued at $2 billion in 2015. The deal could be announced as early as Monday, Bloomberg reported.

 

The reported acquisition comes amid the San Francisco-based company's nearly year-long search for a new CEO, as well as its first profit from its services. Founded in 2008, GitHub hosts 27 million software developers working on 80 million repositories of code.

 

The deal is expected to help Microsoft by adding programming tools and partner with a company that has become a key way in how Microsoft writes its software.

 

Business Insider first reported talks between the companies on Friday.

 

Microsoft declined to comment, and GitHub representatives didn't immediately respond to a request for comment.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Today, we announced an agreement to acquire GitHub, the world’s leading software development platform. I want to share what this acquisition will mean for our industry and for developers.

 

The era of the intelligent cloud and intelligent edge is upon us. Computing is becoming embedded in the world, with every part of our daily life and work and every aspect of our society and economy being transformed by digital technology.

 

Developers are the builders of this new era, writing the world’s code. And GitHub is their home.

 

As every industry – from precision medicine to precision agriculture, from personalized education to personalized banking – is being impacted by technology, the developer community will only grow in numbers and importance. Developer workflows will drive and influence business processes and functions across the organization – from marketing, sales and service, to IT and HR. And value creation and growth across every industry will increasingly be determined by the choices developers make.

 

In short, developers will be at the center of solving the world’s most pressing challenges. However, the real power comes when every developer can create together, collaborate, share code and build on each other’s work. In all walks of life, we see the power of communities, and this is true for software development and developers.

 

That is why we are so excited about today’s announcement. More than 28 million developers already collaborate on GitHub, and it is home to more than 85 million code repositories used by people in nearly every country. From the largest corporations to the smallest startups, GitHub is the destination for developers to learn, share and work together to create software. It’s a destination for Microsoft too. We are the most active organization on GitHub, with more than 2 million “commits,” or updates, made to projects.

 

Microsoft has been a developer-focused company from the very first product we created to the platforms and tools we offer today.

 

Building technology so that others can build technology is core to our mission to empower every person and every organization on the planet to achieve more.

 

Microsoft is also committed to empowering communities, from the world’s professionals to IT professionals to gamers. We believe in the power of communities to achieve much more than what their members can do on their own. It’s our ability to work together that helps our dreams become reality, and we are dedicated to cultivating and growing communities to do just that.

 

And Microsoft is all-in on open source. We have been on a journey with open source, and today we are active in the open source ecosystem, we contribute to open source projects, and some of our most vibrant developer tools and frameworks are open source.

 

When it comes to our commitment to open source, judge us by the actions we have taken in the recent past, our actions today, and in the future.

 

Given all of this, together with GitHub, we see three clear opportunities ahead.

 

First, we will empower developers at every stage of the development lifecycle – from ideation to collaboration to deployment to the cloud. Going forward, GitHub will remain an open platform, which any developer can plug into and extend. Developers will continue to be able to use the programming languages, tools and operating systems of their choice for their projects – and will still be able to deploy their code on any cloud and any device.

 

Second, we will accelerate enterprise developers’ use of GitHub, with our direct sales and partner channels and access to Microsoft’s global cloud infrastructure and services.

 

Finally, we will bring Microsoft’s developer tools and services to new audiences.

 

Most importantly, we recognize the responsibility we take on with this agreement. We are committed to being stewards of the GitHub community, which will retain its developer-first ethos, operate independently and remain an open platform. We will always listen to developer feedback and invest in both fundamentals and new capabilities.

 

Once the acquisition closes later this year, GitHub will be led by CEO Nat Friedman, an open source veteran and founder of Xamarin, who will continue to report to Microsoft Cloud + AI Group Executive Vice President Scott Guthrie; GitHub CEO and Co-Founder Chris Wanstrath will be a technical fellow at Microsoft, also reporting to Scott. You can see how Chris, Nat and I envision the opportunity ahead in this public presentation.

 

Together we will continue to advance GitHub as a platform loved by developers and trusted by organizations.

 

< Here >

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Microsoft is acquiring GitHub. After reports emerged that the software giant was in talks to acquire GitHub, Microsoft is making it official today. This is Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella’s second big acquisition, following the $26.2 billion acquisition of LinkedIn two years ago. GitHub was last valued at $2 billion back in 2015, and Microsoft is paying $7.5 billion in stock for the company in a deal that should close later this year.

 

GitHub is a large code repository that has become very popular with developers and companies hosting entire projects, documentation, and code. Apple, Amazon, Google, and many other big tech companies use GitHub. There are 85 million repositories hosted on GitHub, and 28 million developers contribute to them. GitHub will now be led by CEO Nat Friedman, the founder of Xamarin, who will report to Microsoft’s Cloud and AI chief Scott Guthrie. GitHub CEO and co-founder Chris Wanstrath will now become a technical fellow at Microsoft, also reporting into Guthrie.

 

It’s easy to imagine why Microsoft would want to acquire GitHub. Microsoft killed its own GitHub competitor, Codeplex, in December and is now the top contributor to GitHub, Microsoft now has more than 1,000 employees actively pushing code to GitHub repositories. Its popularity among developers could see Microsoft earn some much-needed trust and respect from developers. In bigger enterprises and slower moving businesses, the fact Microsoft has acquired GitHub will make it more trusted to use for projects and source control, simply because Microsoft is already trusted across many software and services by these companies. “We will accelerate enterprise developers’ use of GitHub, with our direct sales and partner channels and access to Microsoft’s global cloud infrastructure and services,” says Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella.

 

 

Trust and respect won’t be easy for Microsoft to win, though. Developers are already voicing their concerns about Microsoft’s past abuses, and the company’s botched acquisition of Skype and Nokia’s phone business. GitHub itself hasn’t scaled well and has faced its own issues over the years, and there are legitimate concerns that Microsoft will need to address. GitLab, a GitHub competitor, claims it has seen a 10x increase in the amount of developers moving their repositories over to its service, an early sign that there’s some developer unrest.

 

Microsoft won’t be able to address the general concern that important tools and internet services keep being consolidated into the hands of a few big tech companies. “When it comes to our commitment to open source, judge us by the actions we have taken in the recent past, our actions today, and in the future,” says Nadella, in an attempt to ease concerns around Microsoft’s acquisition.

 

For all the concerns, there are plenty of reasons to see this as a positive for Microsoft and GitHub users. Microsoft has been actively pushing open source technology, and the company has open sourced PowerShell, Visual Studio Code, and the Microsoft Edge JavaScript engine. Microsoft also partnered with Canonical to bring Ubuntu to Windows 10, and acquired Xamarin to assist with mobile app development. These are moves that have been met with surprise by developers initially, but that have earned respect. It’s essential that Microsoft stewards the GitHub community forward to earn even more trust and developer love. The Microsoft old isn’t the Microsoft of new, and this GitHub acquisition is a chance for Microsoft to prove that even further.

 

Microsoft has struggled with developer love for years, and it’s a big part of the reasons Windows Phone failed and that its Universal Windows Apps platform hasn’t taken off. Microsoft has spent recent years improving Windows 10 so it’s a respectable development box, and tools like Visual Studio Code — which lets developers build and debug web and cloud applications — have soared in popularity with developers.

 

 

The question around this acquisition will be what Microsoft does with GitHub in the future. LinkedIn has largely remained separate, with some integrations into Microsoft’s Office software. Microsoft’s Minecraft acquisition has been managed equally well, and it’s likely that GitHub will need to stay as separate as possible to maintain developer trust.

 

However, we could start to see even closer integration between Microsoft’s developer tools and the service. At Build last month, Microsoft continued its close work with GitHub by integrating the service into the company’s App Center for developers.

 

Microsoft clearly knows it needs to treat this acquisition with care. “Most importantly, we recognize the responsibility we take on with this agreement,” explains Nadella. “We are committed to being stewards of the GitHub community, which will retain its developer-first ethos, operate independently and remain an open platform. We will always listen to developer feedback and invest in both fundamentals and new capabilities.”

 

Source: Microsoft confirms it’s acquiring GitHub for $7.5 billion (The Verge)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

straycat19

Any wagers on how long it will take them to totally screw up Github?  

Link to comment
Share on other sites

What Microsoft buying GitHub means to open-source software development

 

Buying GitHub may make sense for Microsoft, but many open-source developers hate the deal.

 

A few years back, the mere idea of Microsoft (Microsoft of all companies!) buying GitHub, the leading open-source development hosting company, would have been seen as nuts. Today, Microsoft is buying GitHub for a cool $7.5-billion in stock. Not a bad price for a company's that never seen a dime of net revenue.

 

But, Microsoft isn't buying GitHub for revenue. It's buying it because as Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella put it: "Microsoft is a developer-first company, and by joining forces with GitHub we strengthen our commitment to developer freedom, openness, and innovation."

 

People agree that GitHub is the most popular open-source version control code repository in the world. No other company or group comes close. As of March 2018, GitHub had over 28 million users and 85 million code repositories.

 

Sacha Labourey, CEO of CloudBees, the enterprise Jenkins continuous integration site "can't think of a better destination for GitHub than 'The New Microsoft.' The New Microsoft totally gets developers. GitHub has built an amazing social network for developers who are likely not going to be in a hurry to leave this buzzing hive anytime soon for some temporary FUD."

 

FUD? Former Microsoft CEO Steve "Linux is a cancer" Ballmer may have quit his job in 2014 to be replaced by Satya "Microsoft loves Linux" Nadella, but many open-source developers and supporters still hate Microsoft.

 

Roy Schestowitz, editor of the anti-Microsoft and software patent site, TechRights tweeted, "Microsoft is a saboteur whose sabotage relies on lies about 'love.'" He also claims "Git hosts other than #github getting 10 times the usual load (surge) as people migrate away from GitHub."

 

Indeed, Gitlab, a leading GitHub competitor, reports: "We're seeing 10x the normal daily amount of repositories." This is being driven not just because of old grudges against Microsoft, but because, as one Reddit writer put it, under Microsoft GitHub's "real future is a buggy and monetized site."

 

 

Nadella may say, "We recognize the responsibility we take on with this agreement. We are committed to being stewards of the GitHub community, which will retain its developer-first ethos, operate independently, and remain an open platform."

 

But, some very vocal developers don't buy that for a New York minute. They are certain that Microsoft will "Embrace, extend, and extinguish" the programs of potential rivals. As one put it on a Google+ thread, "What does M$ have to gain from this, other than by either shutting it down in the long term, monetizing it further or by data mining folks? In just a matter of hours, they made GitHub a completely toxic entity."

 

Actually, leaving aside Microsoft's aforementioned reasons to buy GitHub, Microsoft is a huge GitHub user. Microsoft uses the Git protocol -- ironically created by Linus Torvalds to manage Linux -- in Visual Studio Team Service. Microsoft also already uses GitHub for many of its own programs. Indeed, João Pedro Martins, an Azure Architect Manager claims, "Microsoft is already the biggest contributor anyway."

 

Microsoft developer, Miguel de Icaza, founder of the open-source programs Mono and GNOME, remarked, "Satya looked at Microsoft's bill from all the code we host on GitHub and figured it would be cheaper to buy the company."

 

Still other developers and companies don't want their code being hosted on a site that now belongs to a major competitor. In response to de Icaza, Matt Van Horn, wrote, "It's gonna be so cool that Microsoft will be able to peek into the private repos of people trying to compete with them, won't it?"

 

Some open-source developers are sick and tired of treating Microsoft like it hasn't changed its way over the last few years. Jon Masters, Red Hat's chief ARM architect wrote on Google+, "If you're needlessly hating on Microsoft for buying GitHub, I hate to be the one to have to tell you this, but the world changed. It's time to move forward with life and accept that in 2018, MSFT isn't the Great Satan out to destroy all Open Source."

 

James Bottomley, a Distinguished Engineer at IBM Research and a leading Linux developer, added in a blog post, "Companies with well established open-source business models and motivations that don't depend on the whims of VCs are much more trustworthy in open source in the long term. Although it's a fairly recent convert, Microsoft is now among these because it's clearly visible how its conversion from desktop to cloud both requires open source and requires Microsoft to play nicely with open source."

 

As for Microsoft's bad track record, Bottomley thinks that's a "bonus because from the corporate point of view it has to be extra vigilant in maintaining its open source credentials."

The real battle over GitHub's future won't be in social media battles. It will be with GitHub's users. Will they be moving their code out of GitHub as soon as possible? Are they comfortable with leaving their program in MS-GitHub? Only time, and Microsoft's actions, will tell.

 

Source

 

So far what i see on social media things  dont look good because everything M$  buy turn to shit . Maybe they just buy Github to shut it down it makes sense they cant defeat Linux  but they can  buy and close down github down once everyone leaves they still achieved one of there goals by killing off part  of the competition  . That's how most that buy outs in businesses works.

 

Quote

DaGoodBoy

I had my MCSE back in 1996 for Windows 3.51. At that time, the WinNT kernel ran on Intel, Alpha, Sparc, and MIPS. I believed in the Microsoft vision of one operating system running on multiple architectures. Of course, I'd also been playing around with this toy operating system called Linux for about three years at that point, but really only used it because SparcStations were too expensive.

Microsoft took that technological advantage and managed to fumble it completely. Now they are locked into the dying paradigm of vendor-led software development. They only still exist at this point because of the entrenched status of Microsoft Office.

Now in 2018, I run Linux on my servers, my desktops, my phones, and my watch. My preferred search engine runs Linux. Most of the fastest supercomputers on the planet run versions of Linux and since November 2015, no computer on the top 500 list runs any version of Windows.

Microsoft may have deep pockets, but everything they buy turns to shit, just like it does for Oracle.

 

Quote

 

SunnyAX3

MS got Codeplex. They managed to royal destroy that. Now they move to Github probable mostly because was a name. I am sure very soon lots of projects will migrate to other git online services. I am pretty sure they will manage to bring other MS philosophy to GitHub and finish. Also MS got man power to build from ground a git online service, but they did not. Must be something tricky here.

So yeah, don't even wonder, just move to something else.

 

Quote


mistralol

Personally I find them hard to trust as a company (like a lot of companies).

Just look at windows 10. Inline advertising, privacy issues functional restrictions.

Look at what they did to skype as a good example. Its probably going to be something like SF by the time they are finished. I guess though nothing will change for a number of months.

 

 

Quote

]brynjolf

Look at what they are doing to OneDrive... Everytime I use it I have to click away a nag screen for me to upgrade. The only bright shiny button that is shown on every single screen is a nag button to upgrade. It is super obnoxious. They have stopped caring for end users while flirting with developers.

Ok you say, but we are developers, that is GitHub's focus. Sure, but for how long? Skype was for everyone, so was OneDrive. Eventually it has to make money and then it is dead in the water as far as user friendliness and intrusion goes. I agree with you.

 

This is some of the things the open source community keep saying about them  all this was said in the last 8 hours. :naughty:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

47 minutes ago, straycat19 said:

Any wagers on how long it will take them to totally screw up Github?  

I would not take you up on that bet  today  marks a end of a era for Github  ,people will just migrate to somewhere else just like they did from SourceForge only reason github has all them users was a few years ago the former owner of SourceForge was pushing drive by malware like cnet use to do .Now SourceForge have new owners and it clean now. i would say it be a better place to host you're files than M$ owned github. Still many Linux projects are hosted on SourceForge . Linux Mint and Ubuntu have servers all over the world and most Linux updates are hosted on Launchpad  just they use github for a repo to build things they can easy switch . 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

straycat19
2 minutes ago, steven36 said:

Now SourceForge have new owners and it clean i would say it be a better place to host

 

Have to agree with that.  And it is about the only large hosting place left that isn't associated with Microsoft.  We should have seen the writing on the wall when Microsoft closed CodePlex and told the developers to move to GitHub.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 minute ago, straycat19 said:

 

Have to agree with that.  And it is about the only large hosting place left that isn't associated with Microsoft.  We should have seen the writing on the wall when Microsoft closed CodePlex and told the developers to move to GitHub.

You got gitlab , bitbuket , .teknik , gitea , notabug.org and the list goes on and on most of them all you have to do is import you're repo from github into there's ..Smart devs have more than one git  anyways .

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Microsoft’s Github purchase sends talent to rival GitLab

 

 

Microsoft announced on Monday the acquisition of popular code repository Github, but there may not be as many users on the platform once the purchase is finalized.

 

Worried about what changes the software giant will bring, many developers are getting a head start before the acquisition goes through, moving their code to services like GitLab and Bitbucket.

 

Github’s rivals are even exploiting the news in marketing campaigns with surprising success. GitLab is riding the #movingtogitlab hashtag, which has seen a good deal of traction on Twitter. The company reports 10 times the normal number of repositories being added daily. The flood of new users is even forcing it to scale up its operation.

 

Github is a crucial tool for more than 25 million developers, allowing them to store projects, documentation, and code and to collaborate with others. GitLab, a repository manager, offers many of the same features as Github, but comes with a few extras, like built-in continuous integration and delivery. GitLab’s pricing plans are also less expensive on the whole.

Microsoft’s buyout has caused a polarizing reaction in the developer community. Users took their opinions to Twitter, many praising the buyout given Microsoft’s position in the software space, while critics of the firm rejected the purchase and urged others to find a new home for their code.

Reddit users have been similarly vocal about switching to GitLab with some citing the drastic changes Microsoft has made in recent years to products like Skype and Windows. Others fear the mega-corporation will use the acquisition to gain ground in the industry at their expense. 

Microsoft tried to dispel these concerns in its announcement.

“GitHub will remain an open platform, which any developer can plug into and extend,” Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella wrote in a blog post. “Developers will continue to be able to use the programming languages, tools and operating systems of their choice for their projects—and will still be able to deploy their code on any cloud and any device. Second, we will accelerate enterprise developers’ use of GitHub, with our direct sales and partner channels and access to Microsoft’s global cloud infrastructure and services.”

With its purchase of Github, Microsoft is completing its turnaround from its days under Steve Ballmer, who once described the open-source operating system Linux as a “cancer.” Since taking over in 2014, Nadella has pushed Microsoft toward open-source technology and even made it a sponsor of the Open Source Initiative advocacy group.

 

Facebook, Apple, and Google all use Github, but few other companies contribute as much as Microsoft, which has more than 1,000 employees actively pushing repositories to the service. Despite its presence on the platform, Microsoft will need to answer heated questions from concerned coders about the future it has planned for Github.

 

“Most importantly, we recognize the responsibility we take on with this agreement,” Nadella wrote. “We are committed to being stewards of the GitHub community, which will retain its developer-first ethos, operate independently and remain an open platform. We will always listen to developer feedback and invest in both fundamentals and new capabilities.”

 

It’s not clear how much Microsoft will pay to acquire Github, which was last valued at $2 billion in 2015. Reports say Github approved the deal because it was impressed by Nadella. Once the acquisition closes “later this year,” Nat Friedman, the founder of Xamarin, will take over as CEO of Github and will report to Microsoft Cloud + AI Group executive vice president Scott Guthrie. Github’s co-founder Chris Wanstrath will be a technical fellow at Microsoft.

 

You can learn more about Microsoft’s vision for Github going forward in this open presentation shared by Nadella. 

 

Source

 

10 reasons why teams are switching from GitHub to Bitbucket after Microsoft acquisition

https://blog.bitbucket.org/2018/06/04/10-reasons-teams-switching-github-bitbucket-microsoft-acquisition/

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, Dhruv2193 said:

I did not know Github was so big that MS will acquire it for 7.5bn$

maybe developer move to gitlab;)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, straycat19 said:

We should have seen the writing on the wall

Yep.  But we never look at the wall until the wall falls down (until what happens happens).  ;)

 

Cheers!  :drunk:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Everyone complaining about Microsoft buying GitHub needs to offer a better solution

 

GitHub needed a buyer, and there aren't too many options.

 

Microsoft is buying GitHub for $7.5 billion dollars, and predictably, there's a developer backlash.

 

GitHub, though notionally a for-profit company, has become an essential, integral part of the open-source community.

 

GitHub offers free hosting for open-source projects and has risen to become the premiere service for collaborative, open-source development: the authoritative source repository for many of these projects, with GitHub's own particular pull-request-based workflow becoming a de facto standard approach for taking code contributions.

 

The fear is that Microsoft is hostile to open source and will do something to GitHub (though exactly what isn't clear) to undermine the open-source projects that depend on it. Comments here at Ars, as well as on Slashdot, Reddit and Hacker News, suggest not any specific concerns but a widespread lack of trust, at least among certain developers, of Microsoft's behavior, motives, and future plans for the service.

 

These feelings may have been justified in the past but seem much less so today. [...]

 

If interested, please read the rather long article < here >.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 6/4/2018 at 4:08 PM, straycat19 said:

Any wagers on how long it will take them to totally screw up Github?  

 

And, as usual, they WILL screw it up but make tons of money anyway...

Perhaps they will put their servers under water...  :lol:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Administrator

I do not think I like it's option that much. Last time I checked it was quite confusing to use.

 

Some people are saying why are developers worried about their code's privacy. They are wrong, developers are worried about what's going to happen to their beloved code hosting site and not about the the privacy or security of their code there.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...