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Vitamin D and Depression: Where is all the Sunshine?


tao

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Abstract

Depression in its own right is a disabling condition impairing all aspects of human function. In persons with a chronic medical disease, depression often makes the management of chronic illness more difficult. Recently, vitamin D has been reported in the scientific and lay press as an important factor that may have significant health benefits in the prevention and the treatment of many chronic illnesses. Most individuals in this country have insufficient levels of vitamin D. This is also true for persons with depression as well as other mental disorders. Whether this is due to insufficient dietary intake, lifestyle (e.g., little outdoor exposure to sunshine), or other factors is addressed in this paper. In addition, groups at risk and suggested treatment for inadequate vitamin D levels are addressed. Effective detection and treatment of inadequate vitamin D levels in persons with depression and other mental disorders may be an easy and cost-effective therapy which could improve patients’ long-term health outcomes as well as their quality of life.

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Depression and anxiety is hereditary, 49% of those that have it, from research has been found their parents had it.

It mainly affects females rather than males. It can be caused by many things including a job loss, loss of a loved one, low income, poor accommodation, bullying to name five (5).

I would not put lack of vitamin D mainly to anxiety and depression only, a minor cause.

You have vitamin D ( ergocalciferol ) also, D1, D2 and D3.

Too much vitamin D can be toxic and kill you.

Lack of vitamin D causes:

  • Getting Sick or Infected Often.
  • Fatigue and Tiredness.
  • Bone and Back Pain.
  • Depression.
  • Impaired Wound Healing.
  • Bone Loss.
  • Hair Loss.
  • Muscle Pain.
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I know i know ..

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Which brand should we take?

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Try D3: "There are two forms of supplemental vitamin D—D2 and D3. Cooperman recommends going with the latter, since it’s the type of D that’s produced naturally by our skin and is therefore slightly easier for the body to absorb. If you’re vegan, however, you may be better off opting for the D2, since it’s produced using yeast or mushrooms; D3 is often made from a derivative sheep’s wool."

 

Also: Research shows vitamin D3 is approximately 87 percent more potent in raising and maintaining vitamin D concentrations and produces 2- to 3-fold greater storage of vitamin D than does D2. D3 is also converted into its active form 500 percent faster

 

Good luck!

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13 hours ago, Sylence said:

Take a multi-daily Vitamin tablet if you don't get enough sunshine.

 

That I beleive is to do with vitamin E.

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3 hours ago, LeeSmithG said:

 

That I beleive is to do with vitamin E.

 

multi-dailies or multi-vitamins contain lots of vitamins including E and D.

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i take a generic D3  1000iu  25 mg 2 or 3 tablets a day, my doctor told me it would be ok especially in the winter months.

 

recent studies suggest that healthy adults can tolerate more than 10,000 IU of vitamin D per day. John Jacob Cannell, MD, executive director of The Vitamin D Council, notes that the skin makes 10,000 IU of vitamin D after 30 minutes of full-body sun exposure. He suggests that 10,000 IU of vitamin D is not toxic.

According to the National Institutes of Health, 25-OHD levels that are consistently over 200 ng/mL are "potentially toxic."

The IOM committee found no conclusive evidence that increased vitamin D levels confer increased health benefits, "challenging the concept that '

more is better.'" source...WebMD

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