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Trump administration considering government-wide ban on popular Russian software


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The Trump administration is on the verge of deciding whether to block all federal agencies from using products developed by a popular Russian cyber-security firm, which is under increasing scrutiny for alleged ties to Russian intelligence services, government sources familiar with the matter told ABC News.

 

A final decision could be made in the coming days over whether to strip the Moscow-based firm, Kaspersky Lab, from the General Services Administration's (GSA) list of outside vendors whose products are approved for use by government agencies, the sources said.

 

"That's a big move and is going to have some legal implications," one senior U.S. intelligence official told ABC News.

 

Removing Kaspersky Lab from the list -- known as the "GSA Schedule" -- would likely only impact future contracts, ABC News was told.

 

If the Trump administration does move to block government agencies from using the company's products, it would mark the most significant and far-reaching response yet to concerns among current U.S. officials that Russian intelligence services could try to exploit Kaspersky Lab's anti-virus software to steal and manipulate users' files, read private emails or attack critical infrastructure in the United States.

 

For weeks, the White House, Department of Homeland Security, GSA and other federal agencies have been conducting an "interagency review" of the matter, sources said.

 

The company has repeatedly insisted it poses no threat to U.S. customers and would never allow itself to be used as a tool of the Russian government.

 

Kaspersky Lab's CEO, Eugene Kaspersky, recently said any concerns about his company are based in "ungrounded speculation and all sorts of other made-up things," adding that he and his company "have no ties to any government, and we have never helped, nor will help, any government in the world with their cyber-espionage efforts."

 

Nevertheless, the FBI has been pressing ahead with a long-running counterintelligence probe of the company, and in June FBI agents interviewed about a dozen U.S.-based Kaspersky Lab employees at their homes, ABC News was told.

 

In addition, as ABC News reported in May, the Department of Homeland Security in February issued a secret report on the matter to other government agencies. And three months ago, the Senate Intelligence Committee sent a secret memorandum to Director of National Intelligence Dan Coats and Attorney General Jeff Sessions demanding that the Trump administration address "this important national security issue."

 

Despite all the private expressions of concern, the issue was first brought into public view by key members of the Senate Intelligence Committee, who began asking questions about Kaspersky Lab during recent hearings covering global threats to U.S. national security.

 

Lawmakers and other U.S. officials point to Kaspersky Lab executives with previous ties to Russian intelligence and military agencies as reason for concern.

 

Three weeks ago, Sen. Jeanne Shaheen, D-N.H., took legislative steps to ban the U.S. military from using Kaspersky Lab products.

 

There is "a consensus in Congress and among administration officials that Kaspersky Lab cannot be trusted to protect critical infrastructure," Jeanne Shaheen, a New Hampshire Democrat and key member of the Senate Armed Services Committee, said in a statement after introducing an amendment to a Pentagon spending bill.

 

Eugene Kaspersky called Shaheen’s move "an extreme new measure."

 

"Kaspersky Lab is facing one of the most serious challenges to its business yet, given that members of the U.S. government wrongly believe the company or I or both are somehow tied to the Russian government," he recently wrote on his blog. "Basically, it seems that because I'm a self-made entrepreneur who, due to my age and nationality, inevitably was educated during the Soviet era in Russia, they mistakenly conclude my company and I must be bosom buddies with the Russian intelligence agencies. ... Yes it is that absurdly ridiculous."

 

U.S. officials have yet to publicly present any evidence indicating concerning links between Kaspersky Lab employees and elements of the Russian government.

 

But one senior U.S. intelligence official said the fact that the U.S. government is considering the drastic step of removing Kaspersky Lab from the GSA's list of approved vendors shows that such concerns are "non-trivial."

 

A company lands on the list after hammering out deals with the GSA, which uses "the government's buying power to negotiate discounted pricing," according to the GSA.

 

Hundreds of "federal customers," and in some cases state and local governments, can then purchase the company's products without having to each negotiate their own prices, the GSA said in a 2015 brochure about its operations.

 

"The buying process is simplified because GSA has completed the bulk of the procurement process on behalf of government buyers," the brochure noted.

 

As of a few years ago, the information technology portion of the GSA Schedule accounted for more than $14 billion of the federal budget, the brochure said.

 

An ABC News investigation earlier this year found that -- largely through outside vendors -- Kaspersky Lab software has been procured by many federal agencies, including the U.S. Bureau of Prisons and some segments of the Defense Department.

 

Kaspersky Lab products are also used in countless American homes, and in state and local agencies across the country.

 

"[W]e've offered the U.S. government any assistance it might need to help clarify the ongoing confusion regarding the falsely perceived threat they wrongly believe our products and technologies pose," Eugene Kaspersky wrote on his blog. "We're even willing to meet with any of them and give them our source code to thoroughly review it, as we’ve got nothing to hide. We want the government, our users and the public to fully understand that having Russian roots does not make us guilty."

 

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21 minutes ago, knowledge said:

Eugene Kaspersky,  too smart for them all

 

[H]aving Russian roots does not make us guilty.  :smartass:

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Trump weighing government-wide ban on Russian security software: report

6comemonf3113e5.jpg

 

The Trump administration is mulling whether to bar all federal agencies from using security software developed by a prominent cybersecurity firm based in Russia.

ABC News reported on Tuesday that a final decision could come in a matter of days. Such a move would remove Kaspersky Lab, a global company headquartered in Russia, from the General Services Administration’s (GSA) list of approved outside vendors.

Kaspersky Lab has been the subject of media attention in recent years for alleged ties to Russian intelligence agencies. Eugene Kaspersky, the firm’s founder, was trained at a KBG-sponsored school and worked for a scientific institute run by the Soviet military.

The FBI has reportedly pressed forward with a long-running probe into the company, though the government has not produced any public evidence demonstrating links between the company and Russian intelligence.

The White House, Department of Homeland Security, GSA and other agencies have been reviewing the issue for weeks, according to ABC.

The report comes after the Senate Armed Services moved to prohibit the Pentagon from using software produced by Kaspersky.

There are concerns in intelligence circles about Kaspersky’s products. During questioning before the Senate Intelligence Committee in May, six top U.S. intelligence officials said they would not be comfortable having Kaspersky’s software on their computers.

However, others have described these concerns as overblown and unwarranted, given that no evidence exists showing the firm to be somehow tied to the Russian government.

The firm produces widely-lauded antivirus software that boasts 400 million users worldwide, with operations in nearly 200 countries and territories. The company says that its U.S. subsidiary, Kaspersky Lab North America, is distinct from the headquarters in Moscow.

“With the U.S. and Russia at odds, somehow, my company, its innovative and proven products as well as our amazing employees are repeatedly being defamed,” Kaspersky wrote in a blog post in response to the prohibition on the software included in the Senate version of the National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA).

“Obviously, as a private company, Kaspersky Lab and I have no ties to any government, and we have never helped, nor will help, any government in the world with their cyber-espionage efforts.”

 

http://thehill.com/policy/cybersecurity/341422-trump-weighing-govt-wide-ban-on-russian-security-software-report

 

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A dangerous peek behind the technology curtain

 

 

Mounting concern over information security has motivated a growing number of governments to demand access to software source code as a condition for doing business in their country. Officially, those governments want to ensure that software is not vulnerable to compromise as a result of negligence or design. Others worry that scrutiny of the code is for the purpose of identifying vulnerabilities that can be exploited by national intelligence services. No government appears immune to the temptation to peek behind the curtain — and a large number of software firms have complied, compelled not so much by government pressure as the lure of the market share that will follow.

 

Governments have long demanded the cooperation of IT companies in various endeavors; most famously, the FBI demanded Apple’s help in 2015 to access an iPhone that belonged to people who had committed a terrorist attack in the United States. Apple refused, arguing that it could not be compelled to create a key to unlock the phone (a demand that is different from merely handing over an existing key). The company also argued that compliance would spur similar additional demands and that the key would eventually leak into the public domain.

 

Law enforcement officials dismissed the second complaint, but that confidence was exposed as hollow. A year later, cyberactivists obtained a suite of hacking tools from the U.S. National Security Agency, proof that even the world’s most secure intelligence agency can be penetrated and that even “the crown jewels” cannot be protected. And, to confirm Apple’s worst suspicions, the NSA tools were released earlier this year and have been reconfigured and used for the WannaCry and Petya hacks of recent weeks.

 

Still, demands for access have intensified. A provision in the new U.S. defense budget would bar Kaspersky Lab, the Russian cybersecurity company, from doing business with the Pentagon because of suspicions about its ties to Russian intelligence services. In congressional testimony last month, heads of several U.S. intelligence and law enforcement agencies were asked if they were comfortable using Kapersky products; all said no.

 

Eugene Kapersky, founder of the company, graduate of a KGB-sponsored school and a former Russian Ministry of Defense employee, admits that his company has ties to Russian security services — as it does to those of the U.S., to act as a go-between and help the two governments solve cybersecurity problems. Kapersky insists that his company only does defensive work and refuses to do anything that could be offensive in nature. Recently he offered to have his company’s source code examined by U.S. government officials to resolve any questions.

Washington is not the only government demanding to see source code. According to Reuters, from 1996 to 2013, Russian law enforcement agencies reviewed source code as part of approvals for 13 technology products from Western companies; in the last three years, that number has more than doubled to 28. Russia has asked for access to “code for security products such as firewalls, anti-virus applications and software containing encryption” from technology giants such as Cisco, Hewlett Packard, IBM, McAfee and SAP.

 

All complied, but each noted that inspections occurred in “clean rooms” by licensed companies, steps that would eliminate the danger of either introducing vulnerabilities or finding back doors to hack. Reportedly, only Symantec, the cybersecurity firm, refused, claiming that the demand “poses a risk to the integrity of our products that we are not willing to accept.” The others apparently weighed the benefits of access to the Russian market — worth an estimated $18.4 billion a year — and opted for inspection. That decision takes on additional and potentially ominous overtones in light of allegations of Russian hacking of U.S. elections.

 

China is also demanding access to code, although Beijing has reportedly had less success than Moscow in getting tech companies to agree. The country’s Cyberspace Administration has pressed foreign companies to allow access to source code, but few have acquiesced. A banking law introduced in 2016 required financial institutions to use Chinese technology and the source code of banking applications, but complaints from foreign companies and the banks themselves forced its suspension. The new Cyber-security Law is sufficiently vague to allow law enforcement agencies to demand access to source code to “protect national security and investigate crimes.”

 

All governments claim to be justified in demanding access and there is no denying that network vulnerabilities constitute potentially grave national security threats. At the same time, however, those same governments too often have other motives — the identification of holes for future exploitation or even the “mundane” desire to steal intellectual property.

That risk should not be courted; an international and independent authority may be the only safe option.

 

http://www.japantimes.co.jp/opinion/2017/07/08/editorials/dangerous-peek-behind-technology-curtain/

 

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It's nonsense trusting Governments with the closed source codes ..It makes closed source look unsafe  ether way ...MR. Kaspersky  is screwed ether way if he gives the USA Government  the CODE then people will be afraid the NSA  plains too back door it  and if they ban it then they could lose over half of  there businesses because the U.S. and Western Europe,  account for almost 60 percent of its sales.

 

And it's not just the USA not trusting Russia, Russia don't trust the USA and China don't even trust Windows for many years. It was some news post here with PR  from Microsoft about the Windows 10 Chinese Government edition . But the Chinese news says  China has not approved it because Microsoft is yet too really give the source code for windows 10 too them.

 

Government  and close sourced software dont mix it could cause a technological collapse  . Open source is different  if you find something wrong with everything is open to everyone and can be fixed updates comes as soon as they find problems. And i never needed no Antivirus on Linux  yet.

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I posted an examination of why a security audit of Kaspersky software was not a suitable answer for the continuing use of it by the U.S. Government.

 

None of the agencies dealing with the highest levels of secure information and defense have ever ran any Kaspersky software because it is from Russia.  Is it safe? I don't know and an "I don't know" is the same as a "no it isn't safe" when it comes to security.  I keep an open mind when it comes to Eugene Kaspersky as an individual but when it comes to software and security I can only deal with confirmed facts.  I won't go so far as to say his software should not be allowed anywhere in the U.S., but I don't think it needs to be allowed on any government computer, be it federal, state or local governments.  It's called security.  Security software gets updates, and every update could introduce a new piece of malware and there is no way to audit every update, every day, to see if something has changed that puts the network at risk.  So the only solution from a security perspective is to ban the software, as I have indicated to my fellow professionals.

 

The problem doesn't lie with individuals as much as it does with governments.  The Cold War still exists.  Instead of playing it out in Europe, it is being played out in Syria.  And the Chinese and North Korea are still playing the same Cold War games that have been played since the 50s, just with newer threats.  As long as the Cold War exists between the U.S. and these countries then none of them can trust the other.  And if I were Chinese I would not trust Microsoft.  I don't see Microsoft giving up its source code just to get the Chinese to run their Windows software, that was never part of the plan.  Having most Chinese run hacked software has worked out well for the intelligence community for many years, so why change now. 

 

People have proven over the course of mankind that they can get along as individuals even when tribes, communities, towns, states, and nations couldn't.  That will never change, but our nations need to change if our future generations are to live in peace and prosperity.

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Put it in simple words: The U.S. Government, Security & Intelligence agencies must use U.S. software ONLY! :coolwink:

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21 minutes ago, pc71520 said:

Put it in simple words: The U.S. Government, Security & Intelligence agencies must use U.S. software ONLY! :coolwink:

No that's not how it works they have a list of software that has been approved the by the U.S.  Government  it has software from all over the world on it , that the ITs  can buy too install on Government systems  And what the The Trump administration did was remove it from the list , They didn't ban it outright  if the Government Official want's too pay for it and  have  it installed himself he  can.

 

Quote

 

Trump administration limits government use of Kaspersky Lab software

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The Trump administration on Tuesday removed Moscow-based Kaspersky Lab from two lists of approved vendors used by government agencies to purchase technology equipment, amid concerns the cyber security firm's products could be used by the Kremlin to gain entry into U.S. networks.

 

The delisting represents the most concrete action taken against Kaspersky following months of mounting suspicion among intelligence officials and lawmakers that the company may be too closely connected to hostile Russian intelligence agencies accused of cyber attacks on the United States.

 

Kaspersky products have been removed from the U.S. General Services Administration's list of vendors for contracts that cover information technology services and digital photographic equipment, an agency spokeswoman said in a statement.

 

The action was taken "after review and careful consideration," the spokeswoman said, adding that GSA's priorities "are to ensure the integrity and security of U.S. government systems and networks."

Government agencies will still be able to use Kaspersky products purchased separate from the GSA contract process.

 

Kaspersky's anti-virus software is popular in the United States and around the world, and the firm has been a leading player in the cyber security market for decades.

 

In a statement, Kaspersky Lab said it had not received any updates from GSA or any other U.S. government agency regarding its vendor status.

 

“Kaspersky Lab has no ties to any government, and the company has never helped, nor will help, any government in the world with its cyberespionage efforts," the company said.

 

It added that it had been "caught in the middle of a geopolitical fight where each side is attempting to use the company as a pawn in their political game."

 

The delisting was done the same day that ABC News reported the Trump administration was considering implementing a broader ban that would block agencies from using Kaspersky software.

 

Last month the Senate Armed Services Committee passed a defense spending policy bill that would ban Kaspersky products from use in the military. The move came a day after the FBI interviewed several of the company's U.S. employees at their private homes as part of a counterintelligence investigation into its operations.

 

In May senior U.S. intelligence officials said in testimony before the Senate Intelligence Committee that they were reviewing government use of software from Kaspersky Lab.

 

Lawmakers raised concerns that Moscow might use the firm's products to attack American computer networks, a particularly sensitive issue given allegations by U.S. intelligence agencies that Russia hacked and leaked emails of Democratic Party political groups to interfere in the 2016 presidential election campaign. Russia denies the allegations.

 

https://www.reuters.com/article/us-usa-kasperskylab-idUSKBN19W2W2

 

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On 12/7/2017 at 10:57 AM, steven36 said:

No, that's not how it works they have a list of software that has been approved the by the U.S. Government  it has software from all over the world on it

I know, but I find it weird...

When it comes to the Security of the U.S. Government, they must use only U.S. vendors and in fact, the ones with the Highest Standards.

Running Russian, Chinese etc. Stuff inside the U.S. Security & Intelligence Community is dangerously awkward.

 

 

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1 hour ago, pc71520 said:

I know, but I find it weird...

When it comes to the Security of the U.S. Government, they must use only U.S. vendors and in fact, the ones with the Highest Standards.

Running Russian, Chinese etc. Stuff inside the U.S. Security & Intelligence Community is dangerously awkward.

 

 

Well it's called free trade and there is a lot of stuff you can't even find made in the USA  no more like take Apple for one only way you could make sure there stuff was not made in China would be ban Apple if they didn't shut down in China .  Just because something say it's made in the USA don't mean it really is and when it comes too software they can be a team of coders and not all of them live in the USA  so it would really be impossible unless they want bring all  the jobs back too the USA .. it's not dangerous for them too run software from china or Russia  if the app dont call home too over there . Certain software could be dangerous if it requires internet and was used too spy ..But there is no proof  Kaspersky let it's Government backdoor it. I think it's a bunch of BS  myself  because when I used it all it did was help protect me .

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9 hours ago, steven36 said:

Well it's called free trade and there is a lot of stuff you can't even find made in the USA  no more like take Apple for one only way you could make sure there stuff was not made in China would be ban Apple if they didn't shut down in China .  Just because something say it's made in the USA don't mean it really is and when it comes too software they can be a team of coders and not all of them live in the USA  so it would really be impossible unless they want bring all  the jobs back too the USA .. it's not dangerous for them too run software from china or Russia  if the app dont call home too over there . Certain software could be dangerous if it requires internet and was used too spy ..But there is no proof  Kaspersky let it's Government backdoor it. I think it's a bunch of BS  myself  because when I used it all it did was help protect me .

the hole thing is bs with Kasperksy   i think usa are scared of Kasperksy

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25 minutes ago, knowledge said:

the hole thing is bs with Kasperksy   i think usa are scared of Kasperksy

No not the USA just congress and the military are.. keep in mind  Trump  has too play along with congress because if he don't  his own party will turn on him and that's what the democratic party  are hoping for they already filled for his impeachment  and there hoping Trump will say something too make his party  side with the democratic party . The way things look congress is going too prevent Trump from ever having better ties was Russia anyway. Hes never going get nothing done but be on trial about Russia,

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8 hours ago, steven36 said:

No not the USA just congress and the military are.. keep in mind  Trump  has too play along with congress because if he don't  his own party will turn on him and that's what the democratic party  are hoping for they already filled for his impeachment  and there hoping Trump will say something too make his party  side with the democratic party . The way things look congress is going too prevent Trump from ever having better ties was Russia anyway. Hes never going get nothing done but be on trial about Russia,

its a shame congress and people have to play mad games like this 

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6 hours ago, pc71520 said:

I know, but I find it weird...

When it comes to the Security of the U.S. Government, they must use only U.S. vendors and in fact, the ones with the Highest Standards.

Running Russian, Chinese etc. Stuff inside the U.S. Security & Intelligence Community is dangerously awkward.

 

 

 

That's true.
 

2 hours ago, knowledge said:

its a shame congress and people have to play mad games like this 

 

Playing Patriot Games like "Hunger Games" to earn/win some democracy like it's food.

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3 hours ago, steven36 said:

No not the USA just congress and the military are.. keep in mind  Trump  has too play along with congress because if he don't  his own party will turn on him and that's what the democratic party  are hoping for they already filled for his impeachment  and there hoping Trump will say something too make his party  side with the democratic party . The way things look congress is going too prevent Trump from ever having better ties was Russia anyway. Hes never going get nothing done but be on trial about Russia,

 

Lmao the congress and military have the final say, no the people. nobody gives a damn about people, so that's the U.S being scared, don't just deny the obvious and twist it.

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10 hours ago, saeed_dc said:

 

Lmao the congress and military have the final say, no the people. nobody gives a damn about people, so that's the U.S being scared, don't just deny the obvious and twist it.

I see you're typing again just too see yourself talk.. Because you have no idea how things are in the USA only you have you're own twisted view .Because the Russian Govt makes many US software vendors show them the source code does that make the Russian  people scared of us?  No it don't it means there Govt. dont trust us but most Russians install closed source software from the USA without reviewing the source code.

 

Why would we care in our homes  about this?  Russia is no threat too us.  if anything its more safe than USA  software because our own Govt can't snoop around in it. Buy the way I dont even use American made security products like Malwarebytes ,   Symantec , or Microsoft's Windows Defender   because I don't trust them .  My Antivirus is from Bratislava, Slovakia and the Antimalware program i have is based in Edirne, Turkey

 

People don't have final say in the USA  i dont know witch planet you are from only people have a vote and can vote them out if they do things they don't like but if you ever had a felony you dont have a right to vote or own a gun even .

 

  Poll: Three-Quarters Of Americans Say They Lack Influence

Quote

Three-quarters of Americans agree that people like themselves have too little influence in Washington, rare unanimity across political, economic, racial and geographical lines....

 

 

Full story :

http://dfw.cbslocal.com/2017/07/13/poll-three-quarters-of-americans-say-they-lack-influence/

 

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16 hours ago, steven36 said:

Well it's called free trade...

-Tree trade of...Privacy & Security.

-Tree trade that endangers the U.S. Patriotism.

 

"Buy American and Hire American" ;)

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2 minutes ago, pc71520 said:

-Tree trade of...Privacy & Security.

-Tree trade that endangers the U.S. Patriotism.

 

"Buy American and Hire American" ;)

You sound like Trump  but he is all talk and no action so far :P ..  There is no such thing as buying American anymore , That has been gone since the early 2000s .. Everything from Computers too toothbrushes are made outside the USA now.

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A U.S. firm, like Symantec,

which manufactures outside the U.S.

-but uses High Security Standards-

is Not the same with

a Chinese firm with Shady Production Standards.

 

We are dealing with National Security; not Toothbrushes.

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10 minutes ago, pc71520 said:

A U.S. firm, like Symantec,

which manufactures outside the U.S.

-but uses High Security Standards-

is Not the same with

a Chinese firm with Shady Production Standards.

 

We are dealing with National Security; not Toothbrushes.

All the antivirus in the world can't save you from hacked hardware  if they wanted too backdoor the Govt they  would more likely do it this way not threw Security products .And Kaspersky is not  a Shady Chinese Security firm they are known too be better than Symantec why do you think the GOVT  was using them instead to began with?

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3 hours ago, steven36 said:

I see you're typing again just too see yourself talk.. Because you have no idea how things are in the USA only you have you're own twisted view .Because the Russian Govt makes many US software vendors show them the source code does that make the Russian  people scared of us?  No it don't it means there Govt. dont trust us but most Russians install closed source software from the USA without reviewing the source code.

 

Why would we care in our homes  about this?  Russia is no threat too us.  if anything its more safe than USA  software because our own Govt can't snoop around in it. Buy the way I dont even use American made security products like Malwarebytes ,   Symantec , or Microsoft's Windows Defender   because I don't trust them .  My Antivirus is from Bratislava, Slovakia and the Antimalware program i have is based in Edirne, Turkey

 

People don't have final say in the USA  i dont know witch planet you are from only people have a vote and can vote them out if they do things they don't like but if you ever had a felony you dont have a right to vote or own a gun even .

 

 

 

You talk just like the politicians. they say the same things to the people, that yes they have the right to vote and choose the president blah blah blah, but the president in U.S will be the one who the zionists lobby, AIPAC, chooses. not the people, all these Russians hacked the voting systems, Hillary's rivalry etc are just distractions, they work so well that you won't doubt anything. the new president should first go to the occupied Palestine and bow down to the masters to get his presidential warrant. 

 

U.S has never been an independent state because its affairs are not controlled only by its government but also but foreign governments. and it's a shame you don't trust your home made products and rely on foreign stuff. 

 

about Russians installing closed source software on their PCs, not everybody is a computer expert, it happens in everywhere, but normal people are not the target, and those the targets have enough knowledge to protect themselves.

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1 hour ago, saeed_dc said:

 

 

You talk just like the politicians. they say the same things to the people, that yes they have the right to vote and choose the president blah blah blah, but the president in U.S will be the one who the zionists lobby, AIPAC, chooses. not the people, all these Russians hacked the voting systems, Hillary's rivalry etc are just distractions, they work so well that you won't doubt anything. the new president should first go to the occupied Palestine and bow down to the masters to get his presidential warrant. 

 

U.S has never been an independent state because its affairs are not controlled only by its government but also but foreign governments. and it's a shame you don't trust your home made products and rely on foreign stuff. 

 

about Russians installing closed source software on their PCs, not everybody is a computer expert, it happens in everywhere, but normal people are not the target, and those the targets have enough knowledge to protect themselves.

The Government didn't ban Kaspersky on  all there contractors list no way if anyone was scared of Kaspersky they would not be allowed it all ..The Government or a  State can ban things were it can't be used at all  if they deem it not safe or not legal.... so you're just posting too see yourself post .  You never offer no proof too backup you're claims.

 

Quote

According to the Government’s System for Award Management (SAM), Kaspersky remains an active contractor and has not been suspended or proposed for debarment. Accordingly, agencies can still purchase Kaspersky products but not from Kaspersky’s previously held schedule contracts. Curiously, GSA Advantage still shows Kaspersky products available through GSA schedule contracts through resellers. Many of these resellers are small businesses with different socioeconomic statuses.

 

By US  Law, Kasperskey should never been on the GSA lists anyway.

Quote

Last, but certainly not least, is the reminder that GSA schedule contractors are required to abide by the Trade Agreements Act (TAA). The TAA requires contractors to provide either U.S.-made or designated country end products. Designated countries typically include those countries with which the United States has negotiated trade agreements. Russia is not a designated country for TAA purposes.

http://www.jdsupra.com/legalnews/russia-concerns-negatively-impact-gsa-70004/

So really they was just following a law that they should of  been following all along... So the GSA was breaking the Trade Agreement law by having them on that list.

 

TAA Designated Country List

http://gsa.federalschedules.com/resources/taa-designated-countries/

If  it would been the 60s and early 70s, if the internet existed then and if we used stuff from Russia the FBI would came too our house and we would been marked a trader.   You know how many people in the USA were persecuted back then for being a communist and having ties with Russia ?  It was a whole lot.. You don't live here so you have no idea how our Government is! We are not even allowed too buy Russian Vodka or Russian Caviar today ..It's banned  but people still buy it on the blackmarket .The internet opened up some trade with Russia before they was none at all for normal people in the USA  ... :)

 

You know how many Russians live in the USA ?

Quote

Russian American population is estimated at approximately 2.9 million people.

http://www.ameredia.com/resources/demographics/russian.html

So  what you say is nonsense you think those 3 million people are scared of kaspersky? And that is  a very big black market for Russian Vodka and Russian Caviar.. :P

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52 minutes ago, steven36 said:

The Government didn't ban Kaspersky on  all there contractors list no way if anyone was scared of Kaspersky they would not be allowed it all ..The Government or a  State can ban things were it can't be used at all  if they deem it not safe or not legal.... so you're just posting too see yourself post .  You never offer no proof too backup you're claims.

 

 

By US  Law, Kasperskey should never been on the GSA lists anyway.

http://www.jdsupra.com/legalnews/russia-concerns-negatively-impact-gsa-70004/

So really they was just following a law that they should of  been following all along... So the GSA was breaking the Trade Agreement law by having them on that list.

 

TAA Designated Country List

http://gsa.federalschedules.com/resources/taa-designated-countries/

If  it would been the 60s and early 70s, if the internet existed then and if we used stuff from Russia the FBI would came too our house and we would been marked a trader.   You know how many people in the USA were persecuted back then for being a communist and having ties with Russia ?  It was a whole lot.. You don't live here so you have no idea how our Government is! We are not even allowed too buy Russian Vodka or Russian Caviar today ..It's banned  but people still buy it on the blackmarket .The internet opened up some trade with Russia before they was none at all for normal people in the USA  ... :)

 

You know how many Russians live in the USA ?

http://www.ameredia.com/resources/demographics/russian.html

So  what you say is nonsense you think those 3 million people are scared of kaspersky? And that is  a very big black market for Russian Vodka and Russian Caviar.. :P

 

you said multiple times "scared" but I never said that. lol that's the first

 

why should I care how many Russians live in there? that's so unrelated about this topic. so is the food and stuff o.O

 

when I quoted your post, it wasn't about software or Kaspersky, now you don't talk about it, just about Kaspersky. so who's saying nonsense now? :P 

 

Oh I have plenty of proofs for my claims but don't expect they be popular websites hosted on EU or US ;) 

 

 

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1 minute ago, saeed_dc said:

 

you said multiple times "scared" but I never said that. lol that's the first

 

why should I care how many Russians live in there? that's so unrelated about this topic. so is the food and stuff o.O

 

when I quoted your post, it wasn't about software or Kaspersky, now you don't talk about it, just about Kaspersky. so who's saying nonsense now? :P 

 

Oh I have plenty of proofs for my claims but don't expect they be popular websites hosted on EU or US ;) 

 

 

Well if you not talking about Kapserky you're off topic  and I'm trying stay on topic witch this topic it's about trade with Russia and Kaspersky ... And if you can't stay on topic and want too start another topic go post a new topic but that don't mean ill be there because it may not interest. me :P

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