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This Windows XP Theme Will Help Switchers Adapt to Linux and more


anuseems

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Upgrading from Windows XP to Lubuntu? This XP-style theme should make the switch easier, resembling Microsoft's aged OS in almost every area. While the vast majority of those will be upgrading to newer versions of Windows on shiny new PCs, or finding themselves lured in by $99 Chromebook offers, a number will be forgoing the expense and keeping their existing computer running but powering it up with Linux.

As we wrote about recently, our top tip for people looking to switch to Linux is Lubuntu. Being both light enough to run on the sort of older hardware that Windows XP wouldve shipped on and using a desktop layout similar to that used on Windows, it makes an ideal compromise between the old and the new.

http://www.omgubuntu.co.uk/2014/04/windows-xp-theme-lubuntu

Edited by anuseems
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  • brain_death

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brain_death

Except none of your programs will run without an emulator and even then, may still not work lol...

:fool:

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smallhagrid

Another method which may be slighly more inclusive of things that folks want goes like this...

Get Ubuntu 12.04 LTS for it's 5-year longevity.

Simply install LXDE right after and you then have a more complete Lubuntu.

Taking it further, if you then just add in all the restricted extras - keep the apps you want & remove any excess apps you don't want or need - this results in a very good setup that runs on most anything and has lots of goodies, very easily.

If your h/w is up to it and you need some XP apps to work - just get Vmware Player and make a VM of your XP; then you can run your desired XP apps easily and without trouble.

Another good article for anyone who is reluctant to discover Linux Goodness:

Windows XP User? Here’s 4 Reasons to Switch to Lubuntu This April

http://www.omgubuntu.co.uk/2014/02/four-reasons-why-windows-xp-users-should-switch-to-lubuntu-this-april

Edited by smallhagrid
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Hi all,

better still is "Wine": a software layer to enable Ms applications to run directly and quicker (and easier than with a virtual machine).

Details here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wine_(software)

"... Wine is a compatibility layer. It duplicates functions of Windows by providing alternative implementations of the DLLs that Windows programs call,[4] and a process to substitute for the Windows NT kernel.

This method of duplication differs from other methods that might also be considered emulation,..."

If you choose Linux "LUBUNTU" (Ubuntu with the Lxle interface) you shall be able to (re)use your old computer(s) as it is said to be able to work with a PIII and 256 Mb of RAM (The real words are PII and 128 Mb of RAM but I tend to be careful...) and a 5 GB HDD.

I have tried it with a P4 3ghz and 512 Mb (DDR1) and it is really impressive using basic applications.

With anuseems's xp theme suggestion (see first post), you nearly get a real XP without the hassles of installing/upgrading (if you have the upgrades offline), that can take more than 6 hours on a slow computer and you get rid of antivirus/security suite/USB protection needs.

This is a real alternative to buying a new computer and Windows 8.x and it's free.

Best regards.

Escritoire

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Except none of your programs will run without an emulator and even then, may still not work lol...

:fool:

I think Wine (Wine Is Not an Emulator) will go a long way in providing the WinXP API

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smallhagrid

Having used WINE many times - and still have it - it is far from a perfect solution for running w32 apps within Linux.

Many apps install perfectly, and even start & look OK - but then fail to function fully and/or correctly under WINE.

It can be tweaked and will sometimes yield better responses, but here again one may waste a load of time on it.

For the determind there is also WineTricks and Play on Linux.

Making a VM is very easy via P2V and takes little time to do.

(Example - ToDo Backup WS includes a P2V feature that works in a snap.)

Running apps in their native environment via VM is pretty much a sure thing - like 99% sure.

Another benefit of having a VM of win32 is that it frequently runs faster & smoother as a VM than it does natively - AND:

If it gets a BSOD no rebooting is needed - just close the VM and start over.

Combining the extreme stability inherent to Linux with full win32 abilities is the best of both worlds IMO.

(This is also how I do it myself with very good results.)

Edited by smallhagrid
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ok...so i installed this on my old toshiba notebook.... dual booting with windows 7....ubunto will connect to the internet...error saying not supported

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smallhagrid

One of the very good things about Linux in general - and Ubuntu especially...:

ok...so i installed this on my old toshiba notebook.... dual booting with windows 7....ubunto will connect to the internet...error saying not supported

Is the wide range of support options.

Just searching on any error message text will lead to many possible answers.

There are forums galore where one may easily & quickly find answers & help.

I have always been able to solve any problem in any Ubuntu variant I've been using, very easily.

It is important to add that the worst problem I ever had was because of nvidia and NOT Ubuntu itself.

Still - that problem was solved by the community when it was obvious that nvidia would not help.

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I prefer the "Classic" theme in XP. If I switch to Linux, it won't be for crappy XP theme :)

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smallhagrid

I wholeheartedly agree with you on this Banned:

I prefer the "Classic" theme in XP. If I switch to Linux, it won't be for crappy XP theme :)

Over time have searched for ways to implement a win2kpro-like 'classic' theme as much as possible because it is easiest on my old eyes.

Sadly most of what I've ever found is not useful or even usable - with the exception of the very buggy ZorinOS that comes with such a 'look' built right in in some versions of it - but it is not as 1/10th as good as Ubuntu with LXDE added.

That has been the closest I've managed thus far to a 'classic' windows theme.

Cartoony, very busy, heavily graphic & ornamented stuff makes my eyes crazy - this seems to be a visual problem that some folks have that leads to a sort of sensory overloading.

It is why I never used the 'default' XP theme, and also why all the new chrome-ish stuff is almost impossible for me to use as well.

But=>

I can easily see how for many folks with normal vision - who got used to that old XP 'look', that this theme would be very familiar & comforting & welcome indeed for a way into discovering the Linux Goodness.

Thanks, and Best Wishes.

Edited by smallhagrid
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brain_death

Except none of your programs will run without an emulator and even then, may still not work lol...

:fool:

I think Wine (Wine Is Not an Emulator) will go a long way in providing the WinXP API

Sorry, I tried Wine and found it to be totally sh*t...

Just my experience of course!

:sorry:

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Linux seems to be losing new-found Windows Followers even before the XP wounds have begun to heal. :think:

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brain_death

Linux seems to be losing new-found Windows Followers even before the XP wounds have begun to heal. :think:

IMO, I'd say exactly *nobody* who for one reason or another, was still running XP will switch to Linux due to the end of XP support.

No doubt someone will prove me wrong, but don't forget that I <3 Linux. Only not for running *Windows* applications, that's all!

Firefox, Chromium and FileZilla are cross-platform, for example. You can copy your Windoze settings directly over to Linux and vice versa...

No sweat!

:eekout:

Edited by brain_death
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i installed linux...have not had the time to check why my internet will not connect...but from just looking around the linux OS it is nowhere near as good or easy to use as windows...

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smallhagrid

OK, since we've got opinions & anecdotes going on here I'll pitch in=>

About a year and a half ago a friend of mine got sick of paying for his AV every year and asked if there was any alternative.

I explained about there being other OSes besides windows - he had not known about any.

He'd been using windows since 3.1 and had seen his share of bad things happen with all the versions of it.

I installed Linux for him, tweaked it a bit to his liking, and answered some questions for him for a while.

6 months later he'd had no desire to even visit windows again (I made it dual boot for him) and had only rebooted it ONCE in all that time.

In the year since he's rebooted it only every couple of months, if that.

One time it gave him an error message and he rebooted it, and then watched it repair itself - he was amazed.

He uses his PC for hours every day - he's quite the browsing fool, and does alot of emails with distant friends & relations.

Prints envelopes for his monthly bills from the word processing app, keeps his appointments in there too.

Watches online videos all the time about bicycling races and stuff like that too.

He does not download anything, as he doesn't need to.

Oh yes - BTW - this guy is an octogenarian, into fitness and goes for 50 mile bicycle rides quite often.

I bet he's alot older than most folks at this forum, and he's sure old enough to have trouble remembering stuff.

But he adjusted to Linux from windows almost in no time at all and even though he is totally non-technical he has no trouble with it.

So I guess it all depends upon one's POV as well as one's willingness to adjust to different things.

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does go pro cineform and photoshop work on linux...if so i will convert my old note book to use for vacation computer...if not i will not bother to even think about it

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Windows Users who attempt to embrace Linux (with or without WINE) discover immediately that flagships from some 3rd party programs are not supported and the learning curve is far more steeper than on Windows 7/8. Moreover programs which are supported often run sluggish and are not fully compatible.

Not to forget the XP User is just your average Joe who lacks the wider experience (and quite likely hardware specification) that other Users have already gained through a hands-on usage of different Windows.

I personally know some members of this Board who deserve to be driving Linux - they're tech savvy. I'm afraid the XP Users that I've encountered are not cut out for Linux - they were created by God to ply only on XP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . until death does them apart.

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Except none of your programs will run without an emulator and even then, may still not work lol...

:fool:

I think Wine (Wine Is Not an Emulator) will go a long way in providing the WinXP API

Sorry, I tried Wine and found it to be totally sh*t...

Just my experience of course!

:sorry:

I haven't used wine for a few years but it was quite good already then, why did you find it shit, did programs not work, did they look unnative, did they run slow? Did you try winetricks

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brain_death

Except none of your programs will run without an emulator and even then, may still not work lol...

:fool:

I think Wine (Wine Is Not an Emulator) will go a long way in providing the WinXP API

Sorry, I tried Wine and found it to be totally sh*t...

Just my experience of course!

:sorry:

I haven't used wine for a few years but it was quite good already then, why did you find it shit, did programs not work, did they look unnative, did they run slow? Did you try winetricks

I tried Wine when I first started using Linux seriously, about four years ago maybe? I had dabbled for a couple of years beforehand and read up even more prior to this point, so I thought great, I'll make the switch to Linux and can run all my Windows programs just the same in Wine, a bit like in a virtual machine.

But how dumb was I! Instead using all the latest Wine everything including I think Winetricks, I was presented with an interface that looked like a bad imitation of Windows 95 and the two programs that I tried to get working for a loooong while failed miserably, one on account of a driver install issue and the other because of bitmap fonts.

Nowadays I use Linux when I can and Windows when I can't, either because there is no program equivalent or when this is a very clunky and poor imitation. I would like to use Linux more and have found all the struggles and catastrophes I've had dealing with it invaluable, in terms of how to run my server well for instance.

Linux is not Windows and that's the whole point, so you shouldn't try to turn a house into a boat or eat fake bacon when you're a vegetarian. You just have to accept being a noob for a while again instead of shining like an M$ guru...

People forget how crap Windows 98 was when eleven years later we had Windows 7. If I was starting again I would definitely stay open source; I know everybody pirates here but how can you charge for knowledge and the kind of know-how that runs the world these days? Should one or two companies be in control of that?

:protest:

Edited by brain_death
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Linux has failed to make much progress in their last 10 years with just a market share of under 2%.

Another problem with Linux is that despite being open source, it's failed to evoke the interest-level especially with Users of Windows - check out the following download for proof the same:--

http://www.mediafire.com/download/5mi9avv2fjmlzy3/Spot_The_Linux.rar

Edited by dcs18
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I tried Wine when I first started using Linux seriously, about four years ago maybe? I had dabbled for a couple of years beforehand and read up even more prior to this point, so I thought great, I'll make the switch to Linux and can run all my Windows programs just the same in Wine, a bit like in a virtual machine.

But how dumb was I! Instead using all the latest Wine everything including I think Winetricks, I was presented with an interface that looked like a bad imitation of Windows 95 and the two programs that I tried to get working for a loooong while failed miserably, one on account of a driver install issue and the other because of bitmap fonts.

Nowadays I use Linux when I can and Windows when I can't, either because there is no program equivalent or when this is a very clunky and poor imitation. I would like to use Linux more and have found all the struggles and catastrophes I've had dealing with it invaluable, in terms of how to run my server well for instance.

Linux is not Windows and that's the whole point, so you shouldn't try to turn a house into a boat or eat fake bacon when you're a vegetarian. You just have to accept being a noob for a while again instead of shining like an M$ guru...

People forget how crap Windows 98 was when eleven years later we had Windows 7. If I was starting again I would definitely stay open source; I know everybody pirates here but how can you charge for knowledge and the kind of know-how that runs the world these days? Should one or two companies be in control of that?

:protest:

But wine doesn't come with an interface, you should just be able to run the installer and the windows program will be installed and shortcuts will be created. Sometimes you need to change some settings and wine does have a small gui for this but normally you shouldn't need to use that

Winetricks is not installed by default, it is made by a third party, you need to download and run it yourself, it will download and install some core fonts as well to make apps look better...

Edited by ffi
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Linux has failed to make much progress in their last 10 years with just a market share of under 2%.

Another problem with Linux is that despite being open source, it's failed to evoke the interest-level especially with Users of Windows - check out the following download for proof the same:--

http://www.mediafire.com/download/5mi9avv2fjmlzy3/Spot_The_Linux.rar

You mean linux on the desktop of course because on smartphones and tablets linux is the absolute king and supposedly chromebooks are selling quite well in the US...

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Linux has failed to make much progress in their last 10 years with just a market share of under 2%.

Another problem with Linux is that despite being open source, it's failed to evoke the interest-level especially with Users of Windows - check out the following download for proof the same:--

http://www.mediafire.com/download/5mi9avv2fjmlzy3/Spot_The_Linux.rar

You mean linux on the desktop of course because on smartphones and tablets linux is the absolute king and supposedly chromebooks are selling quite well in the US...

Well, of course - the desktop (unless, I'm signed in at the wrong site.)

As far as devices of mobility are concerned - I'd rather prefer the Emperor than one of the kings serving him. ;)

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