Jump to content

Shrinking chip could keep us on track with Moore's law


Lite

Recommended Posts

  • Administrator

Silicon chips could become even more densely packed with transistors thanks to a breakthrough that carves features in silicon that are many times smaller than the wavelength of the light used to make them.

The new approach produces grids of parallel lines just 25 nanometers wide using light with a wavelength of 351 nm. The grids are not functional circuits but could be made into working chips by adding extra small features.

The technique could help us keep track with Moore's law, which states that the number of transistors we can fit on a chip will double every two years.

Doing this depends on our ability to keep reducing the size of the structures on electronic chips. Today the smallest features on most computer chips are about 65 nm in size, but the first 45-nm chips have begun rolling off production lines, and 32-nm chips have been made in the laboratory.

view.gifView: Original Article

Link to comment
Share on other sites


  • Views 1.1k
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...