Jump to content

[Eye Health] Healthy Diet May Lower Risk of Age-Related Macular Degeneration


Recommended Posts

Diet may affect individuals’ risks related to the development and progression of age-related macular degeneration, a progressive chronic disease of the central retina and a leading cause of irreversible, severe vision loss in Western countries, according to a review of previous studies, published in the journal Clinical & Experimental Ophthalmology.

 

To evaluate the role of diet and food intake in age-related macular degeneration (AMD), University of Auckland researcher Naoko Chapman and colleagues conducted a systematic review of 18 high-quality studies.

 

“The objective of the work was to review systematically, evidence on the role of diet and food intake in AMD,” the scientists explained.

 

“The focus was on epidemiological studies around food intake rather than studies on supplement intervention.”

 

Adherence to a Mediterranean diet was linked with a decreased risk of AMD progression.

 

An Oriental diet pattern had decreased association with AMD prevalence, whereas a Western diet pattern had increased association with the prevalence of the disease.

 

High consumption of vegetables rich in carotenoids and fatty fish containing omega-3 fatty acids was beneficial for those at risk of AMD. High glycemic index diets and alcohol consumption of greater than two drinks a day had increased association with AMD.

 

“The review and its analyses show that there are multifactorial influences of diet and food intake on the incidence and progression of AMD,” the researchers said.

 

“Adherence to a Mediterranean diet based on high consumption of fruits, vegetables, legumes, whole grains and nuts, moderate consumption of fish, poultry and dairy, use of olive oil in place of other oils/fats, optional low amounts of red wine, and limited consumption of red meat should be encouraged.”

 

“The Oriental diet pattern with higher intake of vegetables, legumes, fruit, whole grains, tomatoes, and seafood is preferred over a Western diet pattern with higher intake of red meat, processed meat, high-fat dairy products, fried potatoes, refined grains, and eggs.”

 

“The reviewed studies recommend the consumption of vegetables to increase lutein and zeaxanthin carotenoid intake.”

 

“Consumption of fatty fish greater than twice a week is also advised to increase the omega-3 fatty acids, DHA and EPA. Omega-6 fatty acids, such as vegetable oils and animal fats should be kept to a minimum.”

 

“Red or processed meat should be consumed less than 4 times a week and salami or continental sausage consumption should be reduced to less than once a month.”

 

“Low glycemic index food choices are preferred over high glycemic index foods and alcohol consumption should be limited to less than two standard drinks a day.”

 

“Improving the quality of the diet, increasing the intake of foods that contain the nutrients required by the retina and avoiding foods that induce oxidative damage will play an important role in protecting against AMD,” Chapman said.

 

< Here >

Edited by tao
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Replies 1
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

  • tao

    1

  • Archanus

    1

Popular Days

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Posts

Diet may affect individuals’ risks related to the development and progression of age-related macular degeneration, a progressive chronic disease of the central retina and a leading cause of irreversib

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...