Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'worm'.

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Site Related
    • News & Updates
    • Site / Forum Feedback
    • Member Introduction
  • News
    • General News
    • FileSharing News
    • Mobile News
    • Software News
    • Security & Privacy News
    • Technology News
  • Downloads
    • nsane.down
  • General Discussions & Support
    • Filesharing Chat
    • Security & Privacy Center
    • Software Chat
    • Mobile Mania
    • Technology Talk
    • Entertainment Exchange
    • Guides & Tutorials
  • Off-Topic Chat
    • The Chat Bar
    • Jokes & Funny Stuff
    • Polling Station

Categories

  • Drivers
  • Filesharing
    • BitTorrent
    • eDonkey & Direct Connect (DC)
    • NewsReaders (Usenet)
    • Other P2P Clients & Tools
  • Internet
    • Download Managers & FTP Clients
    • Messengers
    • Web Browsers
    • Other Internet Tools
  • Multimedia
    • Codecs & Converters
    • Image Viewers & Editors
    • Media Players
    • Other Multimedia Software
  • Security
    • Anti-Malware
    • Firewalls
    • Other Security Tools
  • System
    • Benchmarking & System Info
    • Customization
    • Defrag Tools
    • Disc & Registry Cleaners
    • Management Suites
    • Other System Tools
  • Other Apps
    • Burning & Imaging
    • Document Viewers & Editors
    • File Managers & Archivers
    • Miscellaneous Applications
  • Linux Distributions

Categories

  • General News
  • File Sharing News
  • Mobile News
  • Software News
  • Security & Privacy News
  • Technology News

Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Found 5 results

  1. Hawaii warns tourists of parasitic worm that can burrow into human brains Health dept reports three more cases in people who visited Hawaii Island. Enlarge / Male Angiostrongylus cantonensis Punlop Anusonpornperm Hawaii’s health department has released fresh warnings about a parasitic worm that can infest human brains after officials confirmed that three more visitors to the state picked up the infection. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention confirmed three new cases in unrelated adults visiting Hawaii Island from the US mainland, the health department announced. The latest known victims—who became infected at different times—bring the state’s 2018 case total to 10 and the 2019 total to five. While there were 17 confirmed cases in 2017, the state counted only two cases total in the prior decade. The new case counts indicate a sustained boom in the parasite’s population and spread. The parasitic worm in these cases is the rat lungworm, aka Angiostrongylus cantonensis. As its common name suggests, the wandering worm primarily takes up residence in rats’ lungs, where female worms lay their eggs. Young worms leave the nest early to find their own windy homes, though. Larvae get coughed up into rats’ throats then swallowed. The hosting rat eventually poops out the young parasites, which then get gobbled up by feces-feasting snails and slugs (intermediate hosts). When other rodents come along and eat those infected mollusks, the prepubescent parasites migrate to the rats’ brains to mature before settling into the lungs and reproducing. The cycle then starts again. Humans are an accidental host, typically infected when they inadvertently eat an infected slug or snail that has slid into their salad fixings or other produce. Officials have blamed the recent boom in human cases, in part, on an explosion of an invasive “semi-slug,” which is particularly good at picking up the parasite. All in your head In humans, young worms make their way to the brain as they would in a rat. But the rambling invaders rarely survive long enough to make it to their final destination in the lungs. Instead, they usually die somewhere in the central nervous system. In some cases, the infection is symptomless and resolves on its own. In others, the worm meanders around the brain, and its presence, movement, and death in the central nervous system all contribute to symptoms. Those can vary wildly but sometimes include headaches, neck stiffness, tingling or pain, low-grade fever, nausea, and vomiting. In severe cases, the infection can lead to nerve damage, paralysis, coma, and even death. Diagnosing the infection can be tricky since there are no specific blood tests that identify the parasite. In Hawaii, officials confirm cases by trying to pick up and amplify fragments of worm DNA from sick patients’ cerebrospinal fluid or other tissue (a polymerase chain reaction test). Still, there are no specific treatments and it’s unclear how helpful anti-parasitic drugs are at clearing the infection. Patients are generally left to manage symptoms and wait for the worms to die on their own. For these reasons, health officials say prevention is paramount. “It’s important that we ensure our visitors know the precautions to take to prevent rat lungworm disease, which can have severe long-term effects,” Hawaii’s Health Director Bruce Anderson said in a statement. “Getting information to visitors about the disease is just as critical as raising awareness amongst our residents.” The department recommends that visitors and residents carefully inspect and wash all produce and store it in sealed containers. It also recommends that farmers and gardeners try to control snail and slug populations. This won’t prevent every case, however. Officials noted that a person in one of the latest confirmed cases became infected in December of 2018 after purposely swallowing a slug on a dare. The other two cases, both from 2019, were suspected to be linked to eating homemade salads and “grazing” fruits and vegetables straight from the land. Source: Hawaii warns tourists of parasitic worm that can burrow into human brains (Ars Technica)
  2. It’s not every day that the National Security Agency urges you to update your computer. Three weeks ago, a critical Windows security vulnerability known as BlueKeep was revealed and fixed. In that short time, Microsoft has repeatedly begged users of older Windows versions to make sure their machines are up to date. The company even released fixes for Windows XP, Server 2003, and Vista—a slate of unsupported operating systems that usually don’t get much attention. Now, it’s an American intelligence agency echoing Microsoft. “Recent warnings by Microsoft stressed the importance of installing patches to address a protocol vulnerability in older versions of Windows,” the NSA advisory read. “Microsoft has warned that this flaw is potentially ‘wormable,’ meaning it could spread without user interaction across the internet. We have seen devastating computer worms inflict damage on unpatched systems with wide-ranging impact, and are seeking to motivate increased protections against this flaw.” Here’s NSA’s Rob Joyce on Twitter: In addition to its more famous offensive mission of global electronic surveillance, the NSA is also tasked with defending U.S. networks. The NSA’s Cybersecurity Requirement Center authored the advisory, which listed out impacted systems and directions for mitigation. Microsoft’s warning compares BlueKeep to WannaCry, the notorious 2017 ransomware worm allegedly developed by North Korea that infected hundreds of thousands of computers and cause millions of dollars in damage. Although BlueKeep affects mostly older Windows versions, there are millions of old, unsupported Windows machines still out there—and, believe it or not, still being used in important places. It’s not unheard of for an American energy company, for instance, to have a Windows XP machine somewhere on the network. That’s when using an old machine becomes a vulnerability to critical infrastructure. The Defense Department is also famous for its use of ancient Windows machines. “Although Microsoft has issued a patch, potentially millions of machines are still vulnerable,” the NSA wrote. “This is the type of vulnerability that malicious cyber actors frequently exploit through the use of software code that specifically targets the vulnerability. For example, the vulnerability could be exploited to conduct denial of service attacks,” it added. “It is likely only a matter of time before remote exploitation tools are widely available for this vulnerability. NSA is concerned that malicious cyber actors will use the vulnerability in ransomware and exploit kits containing other known exploits, increasing capabilities against other unpatched systems.” Source
  3. Microsoft issued a warning over the weekend about an active Linux worm that is targeting a recently disclosed Linux Exim mail server vulnerability. Though existing mitigations exist to block the worm functionality of this infection, Microsoft states that Azure servers can still be infected or hacked through this vulnerability. Exim is a very popular mail server software, or message transfer agent (MTA), that is used to send and receive email for its users. Recently, the CVE-2019-10149 vulnerability was discovered in Exim 4.87 to 4.91 that allows an attackers to remotely execute commands on a vulnerable server. Last week, Amit Serper of CyberReason discovered an active worm utilizing this vulnerability to infect Linux servers running Exim with cryptocurrency miners. The worm would then utilize the infected server to search for other vulnerable hosts to infect. In an article posted Saturday, the Microsoft Security Response Center (MSRC) confirms that they have detected this worm targeting Azure customers. "This week, MSRC confirmed the presence of an active Linux worm leveraging a critical Remote Code Execution (RCE) vulnerability, CVE-2019-10149, in Linux Exim email servers running Exim version 4.87 to 4.91," stated a blog post by  JR Aquino, a Microsoft manager in Azure Incident Response. "Azure customers running VMs with Exim 4.92 are not affected by this vulnerability. " Exim update timeline from RiskIQ Mitigations exist that block worm functionality In order to stop spam being sent through Azure servers, Microsoft created new restrictions on how servers can send outbound email. These restrictions have also provided mitigation towards the worm capabilities of this infection. Microsoft warns, though, that even though the worm functionality is being mitigated, it does not mean that vulnerable Azure server are protected from the remote code execution vulnerability and could still be infected or hacked. "Azure has controls in place to help limit the spread of this worm from work we’ve already done to combat SPAM, but customers using the vulnerable software would still be susceptible to infection," stated Aquino. Microsoft suggests that Azure customers utilize Network Security Groups (NSGs) to filter or block traffic to their servers. Aquino warns, though, that if the NSG contains a list of IP addresses that are permitted to access the server, these IP addresses could still be used to remotely execute commands on a vulnerable server. Due to this, Microsoft strongly recommends all Azure users upgrade installed Exim mail servers to version 4.92, which contains a patch that fixes this flaw. This is the second weekend in a row that Microsoft has issued a warning about known malware threats. The previous warning was about a spam campaign using the Microsoft Office and Wordpad CVE-2017-11882 vulnerability, which was fixed in 2017. Source
  4. Internet ne'er-do-wells have put together a strain of Android malware that spreads like a email worm rather than acting like a conventional trojan. Selfmite spreads by automatically sending a text message to contacts in the infected phone’s address book. Theses SMS messages contain a URL that redirects to the malware: ‘Dear [NAME], Look the Self-time, http://goo.gl/[REDACTED]'. If a user clicks on the goo.gl shortened link, they are invited to download and install an APK file which appears as an icon on their smartphone menu after installation. Once launched, Selfmite reads the device’s address book before sending the message to 20 different contacts using their name as a greeting, restarting the infection cycle. After sending the malicious SMS messages to fresh marks, the initial victim is invited to download and install Mobogenie, a legitimate app for managing and installing Android apps. Affiliates get a pay-per-install fee for distributing Mobogenie and using unscrupulous tactics to ramp up this income seems to have motivated the attack. Mobile security firm AdaptiveMobile, which has begun blocking the spread of messages containing links to the worm, has found infected devices on mobile networks in North America. The worm was first discovered in the US, where it seems concentrated, but activity has also been recorded from a dozen other countries worldwide, according to AdaptiveMobile. Android Trojans that pose as games or useful utilities are commonplace, especially on third-party app stores. These malicious apps typically offer access to premium games for little or no charge, a potential give-away to more clued-up users. Selfmite comes in a message "sent" by someone known to a potential victim, a different tactic that's perhaps more likely to be believed. “SMS worms for Android smartphones have previously been rare, but this and the recent Samsapo worm in Russia may indicate that cybercriminals are now starting to broaden their attacks on mobile phones to use different techniques that users may not be aware of,” Denis Maslennikov, a security analyst at AdaptiveMobile explained. To redirect users to the Mobogenie app, the Selfmite worm uses an advertising platform. "We believe that an unknown registered user of the advertising platform abused a legal service and attempted to increase the number of Mobogenie app installations using malicious software," Maslennikov added. In addition to boosting affected users' bills, by automatically sending SMS spam messages, the worm puts the infected device in danger of being blocked by the mobile operator. AdaptiveMobile has contacted Google and the malicious URL has already been disabled. AdaptiveMobile's write-up of the threat - featuring screenshots and code samples - can be found here. Separately, mobile security firm Lookout has discovered a strain of Android malware in Google Play, dubbed BankMirage. BankMirage is a fake banking app that clones the original app from an Israeli bank while adding a layer of code which steals victims' usernames, according to Lookout's blog post about the malware. Curiously, the app steals users’ credentials but not their passwords. Once this information has been stolen, the fake app prompts the victim to reinstall the legitimate banking app from the Play store. Source
  5. Developer: Fuken Gruven - portablexapps Notice: As Fuken has left his website i just update this version from his latest SAS. Enjoy!
×
×
  • Create New...