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  1. Run Windows apps on Linux with Wine 6.0 It used to be, people would scoff at the idea of switching to a Linux-based operating system due to a lack of software. While that is still true for some folks -- especially business users -- it is less of a concern these days. Why? Well, so many things are done through the web browser nowadays, lessening dependence on Windows software. For many consumers, just having the Google Chrome browser on, say, Ubuntu, is more than enough to accomplish their wants and needs. Not to mention, there are many quality Linux apps like GIMP and DaVinci Resolve. But OK, lets say you really want to use a Linux-based operating system, but there's some Windows-only software that you absolutely cannot live without. Thankfully, you may still be able to ditch Windows and upgrade to something like Fedora or Linux Mint. How? Thanks to the excellent Wine. This compatibility layer (don't you dare call it an emulator), can sometimes enable you to run Windows software on Linux. Today, version 6.0 is released. "The Wine team is proud to announce that the stable release Wine 6.0 is now available. This release represents a year of development effort and over 8,300 individual changes," explains Alexandre Julliard, Wine developer. Julliard also says, "This release is dedicated to the memory of Ken Thomases, who passed away just before Christmas at the age of 51. Ken was an incredibly brilliant developer, and the mastermind behind the macOS support in Wine. We all miss his skills, his patience, and his dark sense of humor." The developer shares the following areas where major changes were implemented. You can see a full change log here. Core modules in PE format. Vulkan backend for WineD3D. DirectShow and Media Foundation support. Text console redesign. Before you get too excited, you should know that Wine is hardly flawless. Some apps and games will work fine, while others may be slow or buggy. There can be a lot of trial and error involved. Unless a certain Windows-only program is critical for you, I would instead recommend finding a Linux alternative -- or opting for a web-based solution -- such as Microsoft's excellent Office Online. In other words, in many cases, Wine should be a last resort. If you are ready to download Wine 6.0, you can get the source here. Looking for an easier way to install it? You can download the appropriate packages here. What Windows-only software is stopping you from switching to Linux? Please tell me in the comments below. Source: Run Windows apps on Linux with Wine 6.0
  2. Wine founder and lead developer Alexandre Julliard has laid out the release plans around the upcoming Wine 4.0 stable release for delivering a year's worth of improvements for running Windows games/applications on Linux, BSDs, and macOS. While it took fifteen years of the Wine open-source project to reach its 1.0 milestone, these days Wine is on a yearly release cadence and that will be continuing for shipping Wine 4.0 at the start of the new year. Wine 4.0 will be the stable release culminating all of the bi-weekly Wine 3.x releases over the past twelve months. Alexandre Julliard is planning to begin the Wine 4.0 code freeze on 7 December, what would otherwise be their next bi-weekly development snapshot. Following the start of the code freeze, there will be weekly Wine 4.0 release candidates. If all goes well and like past Wine annual releases, Wine 4.0.0 should be ready to ship in January. So now it's onto a last call for any new features desired for Wine 4.0. This year in Wine has been the Vulkan support getting squared away, various changes for improving gaming under Wine, FreeType sub-pixel font rendering, Wine Direct3D defaulting to OpenGL core contexts, better shell auto completion, DXTn texture decompression support, debugging improvements, improved HiDPI support, Direct3D CSMT support by default, HID gamepad support, early work around Direct3D 12 / VKD3D, and tons of application/game specific fixes. Wine 4.0 should be a really great release particularly for gamers and hopefully will be quickly re-based by Valve's Proton for Steam Play before moving onto the Wine post-4.0 development releases. Thanks in large part to Valve / Steam Play, there is a lot more interest in recent months around Wine and Valve's financial support to CodeWeavers is also helping along upstream development. Source
  3. Wichita Falls police received a rather unique call Friday morning involving a woman drinking wine in a Walmart parking lot. Employees requested officers to ban a woman from the local Walmart store after she reportedly had been drinking wine from a Pringles can for several hours while riding on an electric cart. The incident began shortly after 9 a.m. Friday when officers responded to a call to check on a suspicious person in the parking lot of Walmart, 2700 Central East Fwy. Officer Jeff Hughes, a WFPD spokesperson, said police were told by dispatchers that they were looking for a woman wearing a blue jacket and black pants. The woman was reportedly riding on an electric shopping cart more commonly used for people with physical limitations. Officers were also told she was drinking wine from a Pringle's can. Hughes said the reporting party said the suspect had been riding around in the store's parking lot since 6:30 a.m. while drinking the alcoholic beverage. When officers arrived, they found the woman in a nearby restaurant, at which point she was notified that she had been barred from the Walmart location. Source
  4. Gaming on Linux picked up some pace in recent years in large parts thanks to Valve Software's investment in growing gaming on Linux. Mike listed some AAA games on Linux that Steam users could run back in mid-2018; Steam improved Windows games support significantly in the same year on Linux, by introducing a modified version of Wine that Valve Software called Proton. The team behind Wine released a new major version of the software that adds support for many Windows games and applications on non-Windows systems such as those running Linux or Mac OS. Wine 4.0 includes more than 6000 individual changes according to the release announcement; since it is a major version, it introduces support for new features such as Vulkan, Direct3D 12, better Direct3D 10 and 11 support, and a lot more. The Wine 4.0 source is already available; binary packages are being built and will be offered soon on the project's download page and various Linux distributions. Tip: if you don't know if Wine supports a particular application or game, check out the Application Database on the Wine website. You find more than 26,000 applications and games listed in the database. It reveals how well various versions run. Note that games or apps that are not listed in the database may still run. Interested users find the release notes here. Check out the short list of important changes below: Initial support for Direct3D 12 (requires a Vulkan-capable video card). Implementation of Direct3D 10 and 11 features such as multi-sample textures and views, depth bias clamping, or support for 1D textures. Direct3D 11 and Direct2D interface updates. Support for more graphics card in the Direct3D graphics cards database. Implementation of a complete Vulkan driver using host Vulkan libraries under X11 and MoltenVK on Mac OS. PNG format icons in 256x256 are supported. Dos binaries can't be run under Wine anymore. If the user wants to execute DOS binaries, a DOSBox instance is launched. Infrastructure for setting DPI awareness is integrated. File dialog improvements. Support for HID game controllers in the XInput and Raw Input APIs. Windows Media Player interfaces implemented. Internationalization improvements. Users who used Wine before will be able to upgrade to the new version when it comes out. Windows users who consider making the switch to Linux, e.g. when Windows 7 support runs out in January 2020, may also want to check out Wine as they may be able to run their favorite Windows programs and games on Linux machines. Source: Linux gamers rejoice: Wine 4.0 is here (gHacks - Martin Brinkmann)
  5. Linux-Windows compatibility layer Wine 5.0 is now out, with over 7,000 updates. Wine, the software that Microsoft has partially credited with making Windows 10 Windows Subsystem for Linux possible, has been updated with over 7,400 changes. Wine is a compatibility layer, designed for Unix-like OSes, which enables Linux and macOS systems to run Windows applications. In the era of Windows XP and former Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer, Microsoft used its anti-piracy Windows Genuine Advantage program to block updates to Wine users on Linux systems. Back then, Microsoft's top echelons refused to publicly recognize the existence of Wine, which meant its developers were even flattered by Microsoft's effort to block Windows and Office updates to Wine users because at least it showed Microsoft had acknowledged their presence. But in today's tech world of cloud computing, interoperable systems, and receding desktop sales, Microsoft has come out as a supporter of the techniques Wine developers used to make Windows software compatible with Linux machines. Microsoft last week filed an amicus curiae brief in support of Google's position against Oracle's claim that software application programming interfaces (APIs) can be copyrighted. Google's case in the US Supreme Court is scheduled for March. Microsoft held up Wine as an example of the importance of open APIs that a victory to Oracle could threaten, which in turn could prevent it in future from creating a feature like WSL – a layer in Windows that lets developers who use Linux command-line tools create applications in Azure. "In another example from the 1990s, an open-source developer created a program called Wine, which allowed developers to enable Windows applications to run on computers that used the Linux open-source system, without explicit authorization from Microsoft," wrote Microsoft. "To create Wine, the developer 'use[d] the same hierarchy of function names' of various Windows APIs. Years later, Microsoft created 'the inverse of Wine', reimplementing the structure of certain Linux APIs to create the Windows Subsystem for Linux, a program that allowed Linux programs to run on Windows. "The Windows-Linux experience shows that reuse of functional code is a two-way street that benefits both the original creator and the follow-on developer – and ultimately the consumer." The Wine 5.0 update takes advantage of this two-way street, introducing Portable Executable (PE) modules, which are built in the Windows binary PE file format that's used in executables and DLLs. According to Wine developers, now the "PE binaries are copied into the Wine prefix instead of the fake DLL files", making the prefix look "more like a real Windows installation, at the cost of some extra disk space." The new release also supports multiple displays and monitors, and there's Vulkan driver support up to version 1.1.126 for Android. Source
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