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  1. Alongside Windows Terminal v1.12.1098, Microsoft has also released a new pre-release version of Terminal with Terminal Preview v1.13.1098. The latter carries over some of the fixes that are already GA now, plus it adds some more too. For example, a Windows 11 animation queue issue, a stubborn ContentDialog bug, and more, have been fixed in this release. Find the full changelog below: Appearance Our Maximize/Restore button is now a fine round boi (#12660) Accessibility The profile list in the Settings UI now offers tooltips for long profile names (#12448) We'll automatically focus the window renamer textbox when it opens (#12798) High contrast will no longer result in a ridiculous and bad titlebar color (#12839) When you delete a color scheme, we'll move focus back to the color scheme list (#12841) Two instances of huge debug log spam with a screen reader connected have been stamped out (#12698) (#12723) Usability We've added some text to the color schemes page indicating that it is for editing--not setting--color schemes (#12663) We're working to refine how color schemes are set and edited, so stay tuned for future improvements! The retro terminal effect (as well as other shaders) will now work on pre-D3D11 hardware! (#12677) Terminal will once again render properly when you move between different-DPI displays (#12713) (#12749) Resizing the window while a background color or underline is displayed will no longer smear it across the whole screen (#12637) plus a fix for a huge crash that PR introduced (#12853) It took us three releases to get it right, but we've finally solved the issue where we'd punch a hole straight through the Terminal when a dialog appeared (#12840) Reliability There was an issue on Windows 11 where Terminal would queue up billions of animations while the screen was off; it will now no longer do so (#12820) We've fixed crashes in ProposeCommandline (#12838), Monarch::_GetPID (#12856) and other parts of WT's RPC infrastructure (#12825) On Windows 10, the settings UI will no longer sometimes crash on close (we've updated to a new build of WinUI 2 for the fix!) (#12847) Miscellaneous Windows will no longer reject certain Terminal updates/reinstalls due to "differing package content" (#12779) Fragments can once again override the names of generated profiles (#12627) An issue from the 1073 series, where you could not upgrade the bundle using DISM, has been resolved (#12819) As a result, our bundle version is now over three thousand! @dmezh contributed some wording changes to the text about transparency/opacity (#12592) (#12727) (thanks!) Some trailing commas that broke the JSON Schema document are no longer trailing, or present at all (#12644) (thanks @sowmya-hub!) You can download the Windows Terminal Preview v1.13.1098 by heading over to GitHub here or from the Microsoft Store here. Windows Terminal Preview 1.13.1098 fixes Windows 11 queue issue, ContentDialog bug, and more
  2. The refreshed Windows 11 UI for Windows Terminal is now generally available with the latest general release of Windows Terminal v1.12.1098. There is also now a pre-installation kit available for system integrators (SIs) and OEMs who would like to bundle Windows Terminal in their prebuilts. Alongside these, Terminal v1.12.1098 brings several bug fixes and other changes and improvements. The full changelog is given below: Changes The refreshed Windows 11 UI from the 1.13 preview builds is now available in 1.12! Bug Fixes Appearance Our Maximize/Restore button is now a fine round boi (#12660) Accessibility The profile list in the Settings UI now offers tooltips for long profile names (#12448) We'll automatically focus the window renamer textbox when it opens (#12798) High contrast will no longer result in a ridiculous and bad titlebar color (#12839) When you delete a color scheme, we'll move focus back to the color scheme list (#12841) When you delete a profile, we will re-focus the delete button automatically (#12558) Two instances of huge debug log spam with a screen reader connected have been stamped out (#12698) (#12723) Usability We've added some text to the color schemes page indicating that it is for editing--not setting--color schemes (#12663) We're working to refine how color schemes are set and edited, so stay tuned for future improvements! The retro terminal effect (as well as other shaders) will now work on pre-D3D11 hardware! (#12677) Terminal will once again render properly when you move between different-DPI displays (#12713) (#12749) Resizing the window while a background color or underline is displayed will no longer smear it across the whole screen (#12637) plus a fix for a huge crash that PR introduced (#12853) It took us three releases to get it right, but we've finally solved the issue where we'd punch a hole straight through the Terminal when a dialog appeared (#12840) Reliability Typing an invalid background image path into the Settings UI will no longer send Terminal to a farm upstate (#11542) (thanks @serd2011!) There was an issue on Windows 11 where Terminal would queue up billions of animations while the screen was off; it will now no longer do so (#12820) We've fixed crashes in ProposeCommandline (#12838), Monarch::_GetPID (#12856) and other parts of WT's RPC infrastructure (#12825) On Windows 10, the settings UI will no longer sometimes crash on close (we've updated to a new build of WinUI 2 for the fix!) (#12847) Miscellaneous Windows will no longer reject certain Terminal updates/reinstalls due to "differing package content" (#12779) Fragments can once again override the names of generated profiles (#12627) An issue from the 1073 series, where you could not upgrade the bundle using DISM, has been resolved (#12819) As a result, our bundle version is now over three thousand! @dmezh contributed some wording changes to the text about transparency/opacity (#12592) (#12727) (thanks!) You can download Windows Terminal v1.12.1098 package(s) on to its GitHub page here or from the Microsoft Store here. Windows Terminal v1.12.1098 brings refreshed Windows 11 UI, fixes Windows 10 crash issue
  3. PowerShell on Terminal with Windows 11 on background Windows Terminal v1.12.1073 is here and the new version brings some significant changes as well as several notable bug fixes that were there in Terminal v1.12. With this release, the Windows Terminal now comes in two flavors, one for Windows 11 only and the other one for Windows 10 and 11. As such the Windows 11-only package is much smaller, around half the size of the other. Just in case you install the Windows 10-11 version on Windows 11, it will automatically upgrade to the Windows 11 one on its own so you can opt for either in case you are on 11. Moving on, here are the bug fixes in this release: Usability Terminal can once again be configured as a startup application, and can be detected by tools like PowerToys (#12491) There was a puzzling "Element not found" error during settings loading; there is no longer such an error (#12687) Terminal will no longer mix up profiles when it is launched in response to a console application spawning (#12484) Formatted copy will now try harder to preserve Unicode charatcers in RTF (#12586) (thanks @ianjoneill!) We have replaced the word "Summon" with "Show/Hide" in the command palette for improved localization (#12603) Our confidence in the settings UI's Save button has led to us no longer backing up the settings JSON file (#12652) Accessibility Terminal now announces newly-printed text to any attached screen reader (#12358) Command palette search now tries to announce the number of results to the screen reader (#12429) Reliability We won't crash any longer if you give us a command line that is a directory (#12538) (thanks @ianjoneill!) A crash on launch related to multi-windowing and the default terminal setting has been quashed (subset of #12205) Fixed a crash setting the hotkey during teardown (#12580) Fixed a different pair of crashes, also likely related to default terminal handoff (#12666) ScrollConsoleScreenBuffer no longer takes the console upstate (#12669) Pressing Page Up or Page Down with an empty command palette, which seemed like a reasonable thing to do, was taught to not crash the Terminal (#12528) Rendering Font axes/features once again work across a DPI change (#12492) You can head over to GitHub and download Windows Terminal v1.12.1073 via this link. Windows Terminal now has a Windows 11 only package, v1.12.1073 fixes PowerToys bug, and more
  4. Microsoft is working on making Windows Terminal the default terminal emulator program in Windows 11 instead of the Windows Console Host, starting next year. Windows Terminal was unveiled by Redmond at the Build developer conference in May 2019 and was officially launched two months later, in July 2019. Unlike the current default app, the Windows Terminal app comes with support for multiple console tabs in a single window and choosing between the cmd shell, PowerShell, and Linux distro shells installed via the Windows Subsystem for Linux (WSL). In May 2021, Microsoft added support for setting Windows Terminal as the default terminal app in Windows Insider builds, an option that was later ported to Windows 11. "Over the course of 2022, we are planning to make Windows Terminal the default experience on Windows 11 devices," Windows Terminal Program Manager Kayla Cinnamon said. "On Windows 11, you are able to set Windows Terminal as your default experience. This setting can be found in multiple places: inside the Developer settings page of Windows settings, inside Windows Terminal’s settings on the Startup page, and inside the Windows Console Host property sheet." Windows 11 default terminal (Microsoft) Microsoft will start rolling out the new default terminal option with the Windows Insider Program, slowly moving through release rings until the Windows Terminal becomes the default terminal app on all Windows 11 systems. To track Windows Terminal's development process and file feature requests, you can follow the project's GitHub repository. "We would love to have your feedback while we are working on this to help iron out all of the bugs and ensure everyone has a great experience with Terminal," Cinnamon added. Microsoft to set Windows Terminal as default console in Windows 11
  5. Microsoft has recently pushed an update to both Windows Terminal and Windows Terminal Preview. The latest update takes Windows Terminal Preview to version 1.11.2731.0, while the stable Windows Terminal is updated to 1.10.2714.0. However, the updates include bug fixes and no new features. You can read more about everything that has been fixed in the official changelog below. Windows Terminal Preview v1.11.2731.0 Bug Fixes Accessibility Resolves hang on launch for Windows Server 2022 (and similar client Windows versions) when tablet input keyboard is activated (#11312) Selecting text in the terminal while Narrator is open will no longer hang (#11386) Reliability Fix KeyChord constructor assertion failure during tab dragging (#11306) Terminal Emulation Fixes alignment of the mouse coordinates when the viewport is scrolled for all events, not just mouse button pressed event. (#11290) User Interface Clear selection on paste (#11286) (thanks @serd2011!) JSON Settings Fix serialisation of findMatch action to persist the direction (#11233) (thanks @ianjoneill!) Windows Terminal v1.10.2714.0 Bug Fixes Accessibility Resolves hang on launch for Windows Server 2022 (and similar client Windows versions) when tablet input keyboard is activated (#11312) Reliability Fix KeyChord constructor assertion failure during tab dragging (#11306) Terminal Emulation Fixes alignment of the mouse coordinates when the viewport is scrolled for all events, not just mouse button pressed event. (#11290) User Interface Clear selection on paste (#11286) (thanks @serd2011!) JSON Settings Fix serialisation of findMatch action to persist the direction (#11233) (thanks @ianjoneill!) You can download Windows Terminal Preview here from Microsoft Store for free. Preview and Stable versions of Windows Terminal get updated, here is what’s new
  6. Windows Terminal to gain Settings UI in the next version Microsoft released Windows Terminal in 2019 replacing the default Windows Console that PowerShell and CMD use by default. The new terminal program contains many features that command-line users have been asking for years like tabs, profiles, and modern text rendering. Although the JSON based settings allow users to customize the app, many users have asked for a GUI page (Graphic User Interface) for the settings menu because editing JSON, while flexible, is very hard. Today, a program manager (Kayla Cinnamon) from Microsoft teased on Twitter that Settings GUI is coming in the next preview version of Windows Terminal. From the GIF, we can see that the Settings page opens in one of the tabs just like how a new terminal tab would. The design seems to be following the Windows 10 Settings app, featuring a sidebar on the left and a detailed page on the right. Users who wish to manually edit the Settings JSON file still have the option to do so according to the GIF, but GUI is a nice feature for most users who just want to quickly launch and change some settings. The sidebar suggests that users will be able to customize areas of the app and each of the profiles. This new feature will soon come to a Windows Terminal Preview release. More information is available through Windows Terminal's GitHub page. Source: Twitter Windows Terminal to gain Settings UI in the next version
  7. Windows Terminal 1.6 Preview with updated Settings UI released (changelog) Microsoft has released Windows Terminal 1.6, their first release for 2021, with a large number of fixes and improvements, the most obvious being the new Settings UI revealed last week. The changelog includes: Settings UI Windows Terminal Preview now includes the alpha release of Microsoft’s new settings UI. The settings UI is not yet bound by default and will not open when clicking the settings button in the dropdown menu, so you will need to add an action to your settings.json file in order to open it with either the command palette or your keyboard. How to open the settings UI To bind the settings UI to Ctrl+Shift+,, add the following to your actions array (or keybindings if you have an older version of the settings file): { "command": { "action": "openSettings", "target": "settingsUI" }, "keys": "ctrl+shift+," }, Settings file backups While the settings UI remains in preview, Microsoft will be generating backups of your previous settings files in case something were to go wrong with editing your settings and you need to revert. These backup files can be found in the same location as your settings.json file. The easiest way to navigate here is to right click on the tab of the settings.json file in Visual Studio Code and select “Reveal in File Explorer”. What’s up next Microsoft is still actively working on the settings UI and will be continuously shipping updates. Here are a few things Microsoft is working on now: Ensuring the settings UI includes intuitive keyboard navigation and improved accessibility. Adding actions and key bindings into the settings UI. Providing functionality to reorder your profiles. Startup actions Have you been wanting to start your terminal in a custom configuration when you launch it? You can now set startup actions in your global settings to configure how your terminal launches. The startupActions setting accepts wt command line arguments. More information on command-line arguments can be found on Microsoft’s docs site. // Launch terminal with multiple tabs "startupActions": "new-tab; new-tab" //Launch terminal with one tab split into a PowerShell pane and an Ubuntu pane "startupActions": "split-pane -p PowerShell ; split-pane -p Ubuntu" Note: This setting is not yet available in the settings UI and is only available by editing the settings.json file. Progress indicator The terminal will now display a progress indicator in the tab and taskbar whenever an OSC 9;4 sequence is received. More information on remaining tasks and documentation for the progress indicator can be found on GitHub. Pixel shaders As a new experimental feature, you can now use HLSL pixel shaders inside your profile. Some examples of shaders can be found in Microsoft’s repository. "experimental.pixelShaderEffect": "C:\\temp\\invert.hlsl" Note: This setting is not yet available in the settings UI and is only available by editing the settings.json file. New actions Scroll to the top and bottom of history You can use the scrollToTop and scrollToBottom commands to scroll to the beginning or end of the text buffer. { "command": "scrollToTop", "keys": "ctrl+shift+home" }, { "command": "scrollToBottom", "keys": "ctrl+shift+end" } Focus on most recently used pane The moveFocus action has gained a new direction, previous, that will let you navigate to the last used pane with your keyboard. { "command": { "action": "moveFocus", "direction": "previous" }, "keys": "ctrl+alt+left" } Move tabs You can now move your tabs backward (left) and forward (right) using the keyboard with the moveTab command. { "command": { "action": "moveTab", "direction": "backward" }, "keys": "" }, { "command": { "action": "moveTab", "direction": "forward" }, "keys": "" } Note: This action is not bound by default. Other features The splitPane action and split-pane, sp command line argument now accept a size parameter to define the size of the pane. The move-focus command line argument has also been added, so you can specify which pane to focus when launching the terminal using the command line. You can now specify a tab color for each new tab or pane through the command line with --tabColor #rrggbb. The terminal now supports ConEmu’s OSC 9;9 sequence, which sets the current working directory. If you emit OSC 9;9;<Windows path>, creating a duplicate of that pane or tab will use the Windows path you specified (Thanks @skyline75489!). When you emit a BEL, the terminal will display the bell icon in the tab. You can also now set the bell style to "visual", which will cause it to flash the taskbar. You can now have a double underscore cursor in the terminal. The command palette now supports "launchMode", which can be set to "action" or "commandLine" . Miscellaneous improvements The “Open Windows Terminal here” menu item will now show up inside directories. The command palette, while in command line mode, will now parse and validate commands you’ve typed and display recently used commands. Windows Terminal will now display italic fonts. Starting a search with text selected will now copy that text into the search field. The terminal has received approximately a 33% performance improvement in the total runtime of bulk text output. Bug fixes Hyperlinks will display an underline on hover even when the window isn’t focused. When most-recently-used tab switching is enabled, closing a tab will move you to the previously-used tab. Right-click + paste now clears any active selection. The profile menu and command palette will now prefer your shortcut keys over the built-in ones. Download Full documentation for all of Microsoft’s features can be found on Microsoft’s docs site and Microsoft recommends checking out the release notes to see everything that has improved with version 1.6. Microsoft has also moved Windows Terminal to version 1.5, which includes the features from this previous blog post. You can download both versions from the Microsoft Store or from the GitHub releases page. Windows Terminal 1.6 Preview with updated Settings UI released (changelog)
  8. Windows Terminal Preview 1.7 improves window management, settings UI, and more Microsoft today announced a new preview release of Windows Terminal, bumping up the version to 1.7. This also means that version 1.6 is now being made generally available. As for version 1.7, the company is bringing a bunch of improvements to the newly added settings UI, enhancements to windowing, and the usual crop of bug fixes. The biggest additions come to windowing, as the tool now lets users choose where a new terminal instance launches thanks to the ‘windowingBehavior’ global settings. The options include the ability to open a new window in an already existing terminal instance or a new window. There are three available options and they can be found on the Startup page of the new settings UI. The tool is also getting a ‘newWindow’ action that allows users to open a new window through keyboard shortcuts. Additionally, there are new arguments for commands to choose between the windows that one wants to interact with. For example, users can open a new tab with the default profile in the current window or in a new window. Another interesting addition coming with version 1.7 is the read-only panes feature. As the name suggests, users can prevent input into panes by using the 'toggleReadOnlyMode' action, letting them avoid untoward key presses when a build is in process. Currently, there are no shortcuts assigned to it. The tool is also getting the option to automatically move focus to a pane by hovering on it with a mouse. This setting is present in the Interaction section of the settings UI or can be enabled using the 'focusFollowMouse' action. It is set to false by default. Next up are improvements to the new settings UI. The UI is now being made the default for Preview users. However, not all options from settings.json are available in the UI yet, and the firm is requesting feedback on users’ preferences on GitHub here. As for the improvements, there’s a new Actions page to list all the keyboard shortcuts, a redesigned Color Schemes page that aims to be less cluttered, and enhancements that make it easy to use with a screen reader or the keyboard alone, improving accessibility. Other changes coming with version 1.7 include JSON fragment extensions support, a new centerOnLaunch setting to always launch the terminal in the center of the screen, a new action for search that allows users to search between the next and previous matches, and a few bug fixes. Here are the miscellaneous improvements made for the release: The tab switcher now displays the zoom, bell, and progress indicators (Thanks @Don-Vito!). The terminal now supports paste filtering and bracketed paste mode (Thanks @skyline75489!). The bell indicator will always appear in the tab when the BEL sequence is emitted. Hyperlinks now support the file URI scheme. And here are the bug fixes: Hyperlinks now de-underline when the pane is not focused (Thanks @Don-Vito!). The tab color picker now supports keyboard navigation (Thanks @BenConstable9!). You can once again use arrow keys in the tab switcher (Thanks @Don-Vito!). Focus should now return to the terminal after you dismiss the tab rename field (thanks @Don-Vito!). Those that installed Windows Terminal from the Microsoft Store should be able to update to the latest version automatically. These updates can also be installed manually from the GitHub page here that contains both the preview version and the version being made generally available. Source: Windows Terminal Preview 1.7 improves window management, settings UI, and more
  9. Microsoft is testing a hidden Windows Terminal Settings screen Microsoft released Windows Terminal Preview v1.5 this week, and it comes with some useful improvements, including full support for clickable hyperlinks, command palette improvements, emoji icon support, and more. If you are not familiar with Windows Terminal, it is an open-source application developed by Microsoft that allows you to open multiple console tabs in the same Windows. Each of these console tabs can be for different shells, including the Windows command prompt, PowerShell, Linux shells installed in Windows Subsystem, or custom shells installed by the user. Windows Terminal In the current Windows Terminal 1.5 release, you need to modify a settings.json file with a text editor to change any of the application's settings. Settings.json file opened in a text editor Microsoft begins testing a new Settings GUI Starting in Windows Terminal Preview 1.6, released two weeks ago, Microsoft is testing a feature that allows you to configure the application's settings using a hidden graphical user interface. To open this hidden GUI 'Settings' interface, you need to add a keyboard combination shortcut for the 'openSettings' command like the one listed below. While we chose to use the Ctrl+Shift+S keyboard combination, you can use a different one of your choice. { "command": { "action": "openSettings", "target": "settingsUI" }, "keys": "ctrl+shift+s" } When done, your settings.json keybinding section should look similar to belowm depending on what other keybindings you have added. Keybinding to enable hidden Settings GUI When you save the settings.json file, Windows Terminal Preview will automatically begin using the changes. You can now press the Ctrl+Shift+S keyboard combination to launch a Settings GUI that allows you to configure all the general application settings for Windows Terminal. Windows Terminal Settings GUI You can also add new profiles or configure existing ones, including their appearance and advanced settings. Windows PowerShell profile appearance settings In the past, configuring Windows Terminal required a bit of playing to see what worked and hoping a saved settings.json file did not produce errors. With the new Settings GUI, it is much easier to configure Windows Terminal and your configured profiles. It also opens up the utility to less experienced users who do not necessarily want to muck around in a JSON file. Microsoft is testing a hidden Windows Terminal Settings screen
  10. Windows Terminal v0.9 adds command line arguments, auto-detect PowerShell, and more This month's preview build of Windows Terminal is out now, and Microsoft has posted a changelog to go along with the new release. The update is available on GitHub and through the Microsoft Store, and it brings Terminal to version 0.9. As usual, the update brings a few new features and improvements, which are listed in full below. Microsoft has also announced that 0.9 is the final version that will see new features ahead of the 1.0 release. Command Line Arguments The wt execution alias now supports command line arguments! You can now launch Terminal with new tabs and panes split just how you like, with the profiles you like, starting in the directories you like! The possibilities are endless! Here are some examples: wt -d . Opens the Terminal with the default profile in the current working directory. wt -d . ; new-tab -d C:\ pwsh.exe Opens the Terminal with two tabs. The first is running the default profile starting in the current working directory. The second is using the default profile with pwsh.exe as the "commandline" (instead of the default profile’s "commandline") starting in the C:\ directory. wt -p "Windows PowerShell" -d . ; split-pane -V wsl.exe Opens the Terminal with two panes, split vertically. The top pane is running the profile with the name “Windows Terminal” and the bottom pane is running the default profile using wsl.exe as the "commandline" (instead of the default profile’s "commandline"). wt -d C:\Users\cinnamon\GitHub\WindowsTerminal ; split-pane -p "Command Prompt" ; split-pane -p "Ubuntu" -d \\wsl$\Ubuntu\home\cinnak -H See below. 😊 Auto-Detect PowerShell If you’re a big fan of PowerShell Core, we have great news for you. The Windows Terminal will now detect any version of PowerShell and automatically create a profile for you. The PowerShell version we think looks best (starting from highest version number, to the most GA version, to the best-packaged version) will be named as “PowerShell” and will take the original PowerShell Core slot in the dropdown. Confirm Close All Tabs Are you someone who always wants to close all of your tabs without being asked every time? If you said yes, this new feature is for you! A new global setting has been created that allows you to always hide the “Close All Tabs” confirmation dialog. You can set "confirmCloseAllTabs" to true at the top of your profiles.json file and you’ll never see that popup again! Thanks to @rstat1 for the contribution of this new setting. 😊 Other Improvements Accessibility: You can now navigate word-by-word using Narrator or NVDA! You can now drag and drop a file into the Terminal and the file path will be printed! Ctrl+Ins and Shift+Ins are bound by default to copy and paste respectively! You can now hold Shift and click to expand your selection! VS Code keys used for key bindings are now supported (i.e. "pgdn" and "pagedown" are both valid)! As is to be expected, the release also comes with a few bugs fixes, which are listed below. Bug Fixes Accessibility: Terminal won’t crash when Narrator is running! Terminal won’t crash when you provide an invalid background image or icon path! Our popup dialogs all now have rounded buttons! The search box now works properly in high contrast! Some ligatures will render more correctly! If you'd like to download the latest version of Windows Terminal, you can get it from GitHub or the Microsoft Store, and the latter will update your app automatically if you've already installed it. As always, the GitHub page also lets users contribute to the development of Windows Terminal. Source: Windows Terminal v0.9 adds command line arguments, auto-detect PowerShell, and more (Neowin)
  11. Windows Terminal Preview version 0.7 introduces panes and other UI improvements Microsoft has released the latest preview build of Windows Terminal, the new app that incorporates all of the command line-based interfaces available for Windows. The latest update brings the Terminal up to version 0.7, and it includes some welcome improvements to the UI. The biggest change is the introduction of panes, which lets users split the Terminal window into more than one section. This means it's possible to have multiple command prompts open side by side and work on them simultaneously. Right now, it's only possible to open the default profile in secondary panes, but users will be able to choose the profile for each pane in the future. The new update also brings the ability to reorder tabs in your Terminal window, and there's also a new ability to suppress the application title in the tab title. If you set a tab title, enabling this setting will make it so that you only see that as the descriptor for the tab. Finally, the border around the Terminal window is now thinner, and it will follow the theme color set by Windows 10 instead of just being black. There's also a handful of bug fixes, including: Line endings when pasting behave properly! Alt+Arrow-Keys no longer print extra characters! When you’re scrolled up, pasting now scrolls down to the prompt when using "snapOnInput"! Quickly opening and closing tabs will crash less! Cascadia Code, Microsoft's new font for coding, has also received some updates, adding support for Greek, Cyrillic, and Vietnamese. It also now ships in a couple of new variants, including one for powerline, called Cascadia Code PL, and one version that doesn't have font ligatures, called Cascadia Mono. You can check out the new release on the Cascadia Code GitHub page. Windows Terminal only ships with the standard version of the font. If you'd like to check out the latest version of the Windows Terminal, you can do so here, or wait for the update to show up on the Microsoft Store. Source: Windows Terminal Preview version 0.7 introduces panes and other UI improvements (Neowin)
  12. Big performance enhancements for the Linux subsystem are also on the way. Enlarge / Windows Terminal, showing its support for themes and tabs. Microsoft Details are currently scarce, but Microsoft has announced some big changes coming to its command-line interface. In Windows 10, Microsoft has been working to make the Windows command-line experience vastly improved, making it work much more like Unix command-line environments. But a couple of issues are still waiting to be fixed: people want tabs in their command-line, and they want support for emoji. Coming in June, Windows Terminal will bring both of these. It sounds as if Windows Terminal will be able to replace the existing conhost console (the Windows component that's responsible for drawing command-line windows) with its limited feature set, ensuring that the new features are available to anything and everything that uses the command-line, including the traditional Windows NT cmd.exe but also including PowerShell and the Windows Subsystem for Linux. Windows Subsystem for Linux is also in line for some big improvements. Also coming in June, Microsoft intends to add full support for running containerized applications using Docker on WSL. This has been a much-requested piece of compatibility that developers have wanted in WSL. Microsoft also plans to address a long-standing complaint about WSL: its file system performance is very slow, taking much longer to create, enumerate, and destroy files and folders than a comparable Linux machine. Some of these issues are likely due to the NTFS file system—its performance in these areas has long lagged behind that of Linux file systems—but a big portion of the overhead appears to be WSL itself. The improvements Microsoft is making should at least double the performance of these file system operations. Source: Coming soon: Windows Terminal—finally a tabbed, emoji-capable Windows command-line (Ars Technica - Peter Bright)
  13. Microsoft released Windows Terminal Preview v1.11 yesterday, and comes numerous improvements and features, including the ability to open a Terminal window by dropping a folder on the new tab button. Windows Terminal is one of my favorite features to come to Windows 10 over the past few years as it provides a multi-tabbed console window that you can use for PowerShell, WSL, and Command Prompt consoles. When using Windows Terminal, you can open multiple console tabs simultaneously with a mix of different shells, depending on your needs and the applications installed. Windows Terminal is now a built-in application in Windows 10 and can be added as the default console program when right-clicking on a folder. Even better, Windows Terminal is open source, allowing developers outside of Microsoft to contribute new features and fixes. Windows Terminal Preview v1.11 Windows Terminal Preview v1.11 includes many fixes, but for us, one stands out - the new ability to drag and drop a folder on the new tab button to open a console directly to that folder. New Windows Terminal drag and drop feature This feature is still a little buggy as if you have increased text scaling in Windows 10, the hot spot to drop a folder will not be directly over the new tab button. Other highlighted changes in this release are listed below: You can now delete autogenerated profiles. Terminal will now optionally present a tray icon and minimize windows to it. You can now set special font features and custom axis values! Bold or "intense" text can now be displayed as bright colors, a bold font, or both. There is a new "Split Tab" item in each tab's context menu, which will split the active profile. Terminal now supports displaying the titlebar¹ or tab row with the acrylic material. There's a new "unfocused appearance" editor at the bottom of the Appearance page (per profile). Key bindings now support the browser keys found on some keyboards newer than, say, 2000? You can now open a new tab by dropping a folder on the + button. Those of you with international keyboards can now specify very particular key bindings to "virtual key" codes or scancodes. On newer versions of Windows, startingDirectory can now accept Linux paths when launching a WSL profile. Tabs created with wt and default terminal instances will now have the launched command line as their title, instead of the default profile name. You can now navigate through panes in creation order using nextPane and previousPane. Navigating through panes with the move-focus action works much better and now also works correctly on startup. The toggleSplitOrientation action has been added and it switches a pair of panes from a vertical to a horizontal layout. The taskbar will now show the progress state of all of the panes/tabs combined, regardless of which is in focus. This is helpful if you’re running a build in an unfocused tab, for example. You can now use sc() and vk() for binding keys, which allows many more keys to be bindable. You can find more detailed information about the bug fixes and changes in the Windows Terminal Preview 1.11 Release notes and on the project's GitHub releases page. Windows Terminal now lets you drag and drop folders to open tabs
  14. Microsoft today released Windows Terminal Preview version 1.11, bringing a ton of improvements to the modern terminal offering. With Preview version 1.11 now out, the firm is promoting Windows Terminal to version 1.10 for Windows Insiders first, before releasing it to all users. While most new features from the Preview version are making it to the stable one, there are a few omissions. These include the ability to set the tool as the default terminal, the ability to edit actions from the Settings UI, and the default page of Settings. The first of the changes heading to Windows Terminal Preview is the addition of an acrylic effect for the terminal’s title bar, which can be enabled from the Appearance setting or by using "useAcrylicInTabRow": true as the global setting in the settings.json file. This brings a modern look to the offering, bringing a Windows 11-like effect. In addition to the visual effects, the firm is adding the ability to optionally minimize the terminal to the system tray, thanks to the addition of two new Boolean settings, with minimizeToTray sending the app to the notification area and alwaysShowTrayIcon allowing for the tray icon to be always visible despite the minimizeToTray setting. Intense text is also getting new styles that allow users to render intense text in both bold and bright, only bold, only bright, or no style. The setting resides in the settings UI on the Profile Appearance page, or can be set via “intenseTextStyle”. Speaking of text, the font object now accepts OpenType features and design-variation axes in the settings.json file. You can check out the documentation linked by the firm, including the list of tags here for features and here for axes. The Preview version is also bringing changes to the behavior of the terminal when it is launched through the default terminal setting, with the offering now obeying the contents of the “Defaults” section in Settings and launching with no profile instead of the default profile. It also adheres to the pre-set windowingBehavior setting. Another nifty addition is the ability to drag and drop a directory into the ‘+’ button. While it defaults to opening a new tab, Users can hold ‘Alt’ to open the path in a new pane or the ‘Shift’ key for a new window. The pane itself is being improved with a bunch of new features. The "movePane" and "swapPane" actions allow moving a pane across tabs or swapping them within tabs, respectively. A new Split Tab feature accessed via right-clicking on the tab allows users to split an active profile into a new pane. Lastly, the Settings Ui is receiving a few updates. These include new appearance settings for unfocused profiles and the ability to type in just the key chords when adding keys to users’ actions. In addition to these, there is the usual crop of improvements that the firm details in its miscellaneous and bug fixes section. Here is the complete list of miscellaneous improvements: Dynamically generated profiles can now be deleted (Finally! Sorry for the long wait on this one). On newer versions of Windows, startingDirectory can now accept Linux paths when launching a WSL profile. Tabs created with wt and default terminal instances will now have the launched command line as their title, instead of the default profile name. You can now navigate through panes in creation order using nextPane and previousPane (Thanks @Rosefield!). Navigating through panes with the move-focus action works much better and now also works correctly on startup. The toggleSplitOrientation action has been added and it switches a pair of panes from a vertical to a horizontal layout (Thanks @Rosefield!). The taskbar will now show the progress state of all of the panes/tabs combined, regardless of which is in focus. This is helpful if you’re running a build in an unfocused tab, for example. You can now use sc() and vk() for binding keys, which allows many more keys to be bindable. And here is the list of the bug fixes being made in the Preview version released today: Alt+Space can now be unbound from the system menu so that you can send ESC Space to the Terminal (Thanks @FWest98!). Snapping the “quake” window to another display will now properly update its size. The nextTab and prevTab actions now work correctly when used through wt or the command palette (Thanks @Don-Vito!). initialPosition now takes into account window borders. Generating WSL distro profiles should be much more stable now. The default profile dropdown menu will no longer take off into space when scrolling. As usual, users can download the latest Windows Terminal Preview from the Microsoft Store or from GitHub. The GitHub listing includes a more detailed rundown of the bug fixes, for those interested. Those that have installed the offering from the Store will automatically receive the update. Windows Terminal Preview 1.11 adds an acrylic title bar option, brings a ton of improvements
  15. Hands on with Windows Terminal 1.10's new and useful features Microsoft released Windows Terminal Preview v1.10 today, and it comes with numerous handy improvements, including bold text support, Quake mode on the taskbar, easier access to the Command Palette, improved settings, and more. Microsoft released Windows Terminal 1.10 today, and with it comes some handy new features and shortcuts for an optimal experience. With today's release, Windows Terminal is being promoted to version 1.9, and Windows Terminal Preview becomes version 1.10. As we have already tested the 1.9 version in preview since May, we will focus on the new features coming to Windows Terminal Preview, which continue improving the console app. Quake mode is now minimized to the taskbar In Windows Terminal 1.9, Microsoft introduced a new feature called 'Quake mode' that allows you to open a new Windows Terminal window while in any other application. To do this, you would use the Windows+` keyboard combination, which causes a Windows Terminal window to open and take up the top half of your screen. Windows Terminal Quake mode You can easily dismiss this new window by using the Windows+` shortcut again. While this is not a revolutionary feature, when your in the middle of coding or managing devices, it provides a quick method to launch a new Terminal Windows. With Windows Terminal 1.10, Microsoft has enhanced this feature by causing a closed Quake mode window to minimize to the taskbar instead. Windows Terminal on the Windows 10 Taskbar To open the window again, you simply need to double-click on the icon in your taskbar. Replacing Feedback button with Command Palette Windows Terminal 1.10 also got rid of the Feedback button, which was not commonly used, and replaced it with a button that opens the Command Palette. "We noticed that the Feedback button inside the dropdown menu was hardly used and we figured this was highly valuable real estate. We decided to change this button to a command palette button to make the command palette more discoverable (because who doesn’t love the command palette?)," Microsoft said in the Windows Terminal 1.0 release notes. For those not familiar with the Windows Terminal Command Palette, it is an overlay that can be opened using Ctrl+Shift+P an The Windows Terminal Command Palette With this change, the Command Palette becomes much more accessible by simply opening the Windows Terminal dropdown menu and clicking on its button. New Command Palette button in Windows Terminal Be bold! With the help of Chester Liu, Microsoft has added bold text support to the Windows Terminal console. You can test this feature now with a command like: echo -e 'Normal, \x1b[1mbold\x1b[22m, \x1b[3mitalic\x1b[23m, \x1b[1;3mbold italic\x1b[22;23m' As you can see below, it looks really nice. Bolded text in Windows Terminal This feature is not fully integrated, and Microsoft says they will add further configuration options in the settings in the future. Settings UI improvements Microsoft has added back the "Defaults" section of the Settings UI that allows you to configure the default settings for all profiles in Windows Terminal. When you make changes to the default settings, they will apply to all existing and future profiles without their own customized settings. For example, as you can see below, I added the Bubbles.ico icon as the default icon, and all profiles that did not have a specific icon configured now use it. Upcoming Defaults Settings page Microsoft says this feature is still a work-in-progress, and users can provide feedback on the project's GitHub issues page. A feature that will likely be very popular is the new ability to add custom actions for various commands in Windows Terminal. Under the Settings > Actions page, you can add your own custom keyboard shortcuts for actions without removing existing shortcuts for the same command. Adding a new Windows Terminal action Other changes In addition to the above most significant changes in Windows Terminal 1.10, numerous other bug fixes and improvements are listed below. Miscellaneous improvements You can now explicitly set your language preference for the terminal. This setting can be found on the Appearance page of the settings UI. The percentage sign is now added to all opacity slider values (Thanks @chingucoding!). You can now close tabs by index (Thanks @ianjoneill!). Font settings can now be represented as an object in your settings.json file. Bug fixes There should be many fewer crashes (hopefully none) when opening the settings UI. Closing tabs should no longer crash in the terminal. You can now open a new tab using the command line without the terminal dismissing. Default terminal in version 1.10 is much more reliable in 22000.65. Default terminal in 1.10 is not compatible with 22000.51 and 1.9 is not compatible with 22000.65. Performance and reliability improvements. For the complete list of changes, you can read the Windows Terminal 1.10 release notes. Hands on with Windows Terminal 1.10's new and useful features
  16. Microsoft release Windows Terminal Preview 1.10 Besides releasing a new stable build of Windows Terminal, today Microsoft also released a new Windows Terminal Preview, taking the app to version 1.10. The update brings the following improvements: Command palette button in dropdown Microsoft noticed that the Feedback button inside the dropdown menu was hardly used and decided to change this button to a command palette button to make the command palette more discoverable. Clicking this button will launch the command palette just as if you typed Ctrl+Shift+P. Quake mode in system tray When the quake mode window is dismissed, it will now remain inside your system tray. This gives you the option to open your quake window from the tray in addition to typing Win+`. Additionally, after launching the quake window, you no longer need the parent terminal instance running in your taskbar in order to open the quake window again. You can close the taskbar instance of terminal and still have access to your quake window because it’s running inside the tray. Bold text Windows Terminal now displays bold text in the text renderer. Microsoft will be adding a setting in the future that lets you configure this functionality. Settings UI updates Microsoft continually works to improve the settings UI experience. Here are their latest updates: User defaults In the version 1.8 release, Microsoft removed base layer from the settings UI. Base layer is the equivalent to the "defaults" section of your settings.json file, which applies settings to all of your profiles. Microsoft removed this page because the functionality introduced an architectural conflict with the JSON fragment extensions. Microsoft is currently working on designing a new UI solution and we’ve received some feedback that a page for "defaults" is highly requested in the settings UI. The first step to their solution is adding it back into the settings UI under the name “Defaults”. This new naming matches the syntax used in the settings.json file. The next step in their solution is to design an extensions page to help you manage your JSON fragment extensions. Add new actions Windows Terminal comes with a ton of different actions at your disposal. Most of them include keyboard shortcuts by default and now Microsoft is giving you the ability to add your own keyboard shortcuts without removing existing ones using the settings UI. Miscellaneous improvements You can now explicitly set your language preference for the terminal. This setting can be found on the Appearance page of the settings UI. The percentage sign is now added to all opacity slider values. You can now close tabs by index. Font settings can now be represented as an object in your settings.json file. Bug fixes There should be many fewer crashes (hopefully none ?) when opening the settings UI. Closing tabs should no longer crash in the terminal. You can now open a new tab using the command line without the terminal dismissing. Default terminal in version 1.10 is much more reliable in 22000.65. Default terminal in 1.10 is not compatible with 22000.51 and 1.9 is not compatible with 22000.65. Performance and reliability improvements. Download Find it in the store here. Windows Terminal Preview Developer: ‪Microsoft Corporation‬ Price: Kostenlos Microsoft release Windows Terminal Preview 1.10
  17. Microsoft releases Windows Terminal v1.9.1942.0 to the Stable channel with a new feature called Quake Mode Today Microsoft released Windows Terminal v1.9.1942.0 to the Stable channel. This release brings many of the preview changes in Windows Terminal 1.9 to the stable channel. Notable changes include: Terminal now supports pinning an instance to the top of the screen that you can summon at any time (colloquially referred to as “Quake Mode”). It is bound by default to Win+` Terminal now supports mouse input for Windows console applications! The Appearance page will now show you a (tiny) preview of the Terminal Microsoft also backported the following changes and bug fixes from Windows Terminal Preview 1.10.1933.0: Changes This version of Terminal comes with Cascadia Code 2106.17. This version of the Cascadia family of fonts refines the “cursive” italic letter forms to have more universally acceptable shapes and introduces support for Hebrew and Arabic glyphs. Terminal windows launched via “Open Here” will open new tabs in the same directory. The “quake mode” action is now named “Summon Quake window” instead of “Global summon something something window _quake” The opacity slider will now display a % sign like it should have to begin with. Bug Fixes An accessibility issue that resulted in misshapen selection regions has been fixed Terminal will no longer minimize itself when targeted by a commandline application or when you target it with -w We will no longer destroy commands using iterateOn when you press Save Nested commands now dismiss more reliably when using the command palette We will not attempt to not un-toggle the command palette if you choose to toggle it while it is open When we encounter a malformed fragment document, we will no longer fail to read any future fragment documents The action editor should now be more usable in Light theme “Open Windows Terminal Here” will now appear in your language 1.9.1523.0 Terminal will no longer exit unceremoniously when your startingDirectory cannot be found 1.9.1523.0 A window that receives an incoming console application will now spring to the foreground Performance During heavy output load, Windows Terminal will spend a lot less time … formatting VT strings creating temporary string_view notifying an accessibility channel that has been disconnected emitting debugging information Reliability Terminal should crash less often when you are closing a tab Microsoft fixed a crash in reloading the settings with the Settings page open An application setting the Terminal background should probably not crash it. 1.9.1523.0 If our packaged fonts cannot be found, we will now be more robust and less likely to faceplant on launch 1.9.1523.0 The “default terminal” feature no longer causes crashes on OS versions where it is unavailable 1.9.1523.0 If we can’t accept handoff (“default terminal”) connections when we start, we’ll no longer crash on launch The settings UI will no longer overflow its frame on launch/reload Terminal will try to do a better job recovering the profile you were looking at when the settings reload 1.9.1523.0 The “default terminal” dropdown has been fixed for High Contrast users VT Support RIS will now reset mouse mode and encoding DECSET 12 (enable/disable cursor blink) is no longer ignored WPF Control Microsoft fixed an issue in the WPF control’s 64-bit build that resulted in hilarious colors Please note that the following features are not included in the 1.9 stable release: The ability to set Windows Terminal (stable) as the default console application host The live action editor in the Settings UI You may not yet see this release in the Store immediately as Microsoft is trying a new “slow rollout” system that follows the Windows Insider program. You can always install a new build from the repository here. Microsoft releases Windows Terminal v1.9.1942.0 to the Stable channel with a new feature called Quake Mode
  18. Windows Terminal can now be the default Windows 10 console Windows 10 will soon let you configure Windows Terminal as the default terminal application to launch console and PowerShell programs. When you launch a command-line console program in Windows 10, the operating system will automatically launch it in a Windows Console or PowerShell console displayed by the Windows Console Host (conhost.exe), as shown below. An application running in a Windows 10 console With today's release of the Windows 10 Preview build 21390, both PowerShell and console programs can be configured to automatically launch in Windows Terminal rather than using the Windows Console Host. To use this feature, Windows Terminal Preview must be installed on the latest Windows 10 Preview 'Dev' build. Once installed, users will see an option titled 'Default Terminal Application' in a console's properties that lets you choose whether to use the Windows Console Host or Windows Terminal to run programs. Default Terminal Application selection in the console properties Windows users can also configure the default terminal application from within Windows Terminal Preview by going to Settings > Startup and configuring it from there. Configuring the default terminal application in Windows Terminal It should be noted that Microsoft is still developing this feature and that there are some issues with its implementation. For example, you can't configure different default terminal applications for PowerShell or the Windows Console, and whatever you select will be used for both consoles. In addition, no matter what you set as your default terminal application, launching programs that require administrative privileges will launch in their regular consoles. For example, if you run a console program or PowerShell as an Administrator, it will not be launched in Windows Terminal but rather in the Windows Console or the PowerShell console. While still needing some work, this is an excellent addition for those who want a single console application, such as Windows Terminal, to manage all of their console applications. To track this features development process and its open issues, you can follow the Area-DefApp issues tag on the project's GitHub repository. Source
  19. Here's what's new in Windows Terminal Preview 1.9 Microsoft has released Windows Terminal Preview 1.9 with new features including Quake Mode and the ability to set it as the default console on Windows. The Redmond firm has also bumped the stable version of Windows Terminal to version 1.8; you can grab that now from the Microsoft Store or the GitHub releases page. With Windows Terminal Preview 1.9, you now have the ability to set it as your default terminal emulator, any command-line applications you choose to run in the future will automatically open with Windows Terminal. While this preview release supports this option, you need to also be running a Windows Insider Program Dev Channel build to find the setting, according to the release notes. To make it the default terminal application, open Command Prompt properties, go to the Terminal tab and then choose Windows Terminal Preview from the Default Terminal Application section. Another new feature in this update is Quake Mode, using Win + ` from anywhere in Windows will bring up the quake window on the top half of your screen, you can dismiss it again using the same key combination. This will save you time when you want to run a command quickly but don’t want to mess around finding Windows Terminal in the Start Menu to open it. Microsoft has already updated the PowerToys FancyZones layout editor so that it can be opened with Win + Shift + ` instead of Win + `. This update also improved the settings UI so that you can edit actions via the Actions page giving you the ability to create new keyboard shortcuts. It also introduces an italic variant of the Cascadia Code font and includes improvements for Arabic and Hebrew. To get this update, head over to GitHub where you’ll be able to find a download link. Source: Here's what's new in Windows Terminal Preview 1.9
  20. Getting started with Windows Terminal At Build 2019 Microsoft gave developers and power users many things to be happy about, but perhaps one of the biggest surprises was the announcement of the Windows Terminal. For those not familiar with what a Terminal is or what it’s for… It is simply an application which takes user input to and presents output from the underlying system. Its Windows equivalent was the command line. For years Microsoft has quietly taken it on the chin about its command line deficiencies while not being able to do much about it, mainly due to the fact that further modification to the command prompt would break backwards compatibility. The solution? It had to be replaced. Finally the Windows Terminal is born! This new utility gives users the ability to run the Command Prompt, PowerShell and Windows Subsystem for Linux in a modern, efficient and customizable terminal application. It brings complete control over the experience allowing users to customize every aspect of the new system. Now that we’ve gotten that out of the way let’s dive into what you need to get started on your Windows Terminal journey. Before June 21st you had to clone the source code from GitHub and build the Windows Terminal yourself, as Microsoft gave developers an early peek at the new app. That is no longer the case and it has been made available for download through the Microsoft Store. The first thing you’ll need is to make sure you’re at least running Windows 10 version 1903, also known as the May 2019 update. There are many ways to check what version of Windows you’re running. But we are going to take you the long way, click on… Start -> Settings -> System -> About and then scroll down to Windows Specifications. Your build information can be found here. If you are running an older version, there are a few ways you can get on the latest as explained here. That’s it! You’re ready to go. By default, you will get access to PowerShell and the Command Prompt. You can add the ability to load your favorite Linux distro by editing the profiles.json found by selecting “Settings”. In the next article we’re going to talk about how to add your favorite Linux distro, version of PowerShell and customize the Terminal! Source
  21. Windows Terminal is now available for download on the Microsoft Store At Build 2019, Microsoft announced the new Windows Terminal for Windows 10 users. Last night the Windows Terminal showed up on the Microsoft Store but was not available for download. Now, Microsoft has published an official post confirming the release of Windows Terminal. This will be the first of the several Windows Terminal releases. At this point, the Terminal is in preview and Microsoft has set winter of 2019 as the deadline for the Terminal 1.0 release. The new Terminal app comes with several new features such as multiple tab support, GPU accelerated DirectWrite/DirectX-based text rendering engine, support for many settings and configuration options that allows users to personalize Terminal’s appearance and more. If you’re running Windows 10 then you can download Windows Terminal from the Microsoft Store below. Microsoft has made the new Terminal open source so you can head to GitHub and contribute to the development of the app. Source
  22. Windows Terminal YouTube Video Removed by Google Due to Copyright Infringement Windows Terminal is one of the most exciting new features coming to Windows 10, and after the official announcement at the Build developer conference, the official video published on YouTube recorded more than 1 million views. And because Windows Terminal is an unreleased feature due to become available in June for insiders, users head over to YouTube to see what it’s up to. Only that those looking for the YouTube video these days end up getting an error because the video was removed due to… copyright infringement. While it sounds pretty odd for a company the size of Microsoft to have a YouTube video pulled because of a copyright claim, the message posted on the page says it loud and clear. “This video is no longer available due to a copyright claim by Musicbed.” Video likely to be restored Needless to say, the copyright claim concerns the audio track of the video, albeit you wouldn’t expect Microsoft not to have a license with the company that owns the copyright of the soundtrack used in a YouTube video. On the other hand, the odd thing is that Microsoft does have a license with Musicbed, so removing the video for copyright infringement might after all be nothing more than an error on Google’s side. Most likely, the automatic copyright scanners used by YouTube are at fault for the video removal, which means that Microsoft’s Windows Terminal presentation should be restored anytime soon after someone manually checks the copyright infringement claim. In the meantime, if you want to learn more about Windows Terminal, you can read Microsoft’s official announcement here. We’ll keep an eye on the video page on YouTube and embed the video here once it becomes available once again. Source
  23. Microsoft releases Windows Terminal 1.7.1033.0 with Settings UI updates, more Microsoft today announced the release of Windows Terminal 1.7. Windows Terminal 1.7 will come with several new improvements including Settings UI updates, profile fragments and more. This release brings all of the preview changes in Windows Terminal 1.7 to the stable channel. Notable changes include: Terminal now has a UI that you can use to edit your settings! If you prefer JSON, do not fear! You can, of course, still get at that JSON file you know and love. Opt-in single-instancing and window remote control You can run a command in the current active window with wt -w 0, or in a specific window with wt -w 1 (or 2, 3, …) NOTE: Even in single instance mode, Terminal windows are isolated based on elevation status or user identity. Profile fragments, which app developers can use to provide additional information to Terminal See the fragment extension documentation for more details. Find the full changelog below: CHANGES Accessibility When navigating and searching the command palette, Terminal will now announce more status changes to Narrator/NVDA (#9582) Settings and Settings UI We’ve chosen to remove “base layer” from the Settings UI for its move into the stable channel so that we can nail its design (#9655) Please direct feedback about this into #9539. It’s closed, but it’s an excellent discussion issue. The vintage cursor height and history size boxes in the UI are now clamped to appropriate ranges (#9370) (thanks @eugenesmlv!) BUG FIXES You can now interact with hyperlinks when the application is in mouse mode (#9396) (thanks @Don-Vito!) Terminal Stable, Preview and Dev will now use different shell extension IDs (#9510) You may hate this one if you use a bunch of different Terminal installs… scrollToBottom will no longer puzzlingly make the viewport jump to the … top? That can’t be right… (#9389) (thanks @Don-Vito!) In preview 1.7, we broke pixel shader loading. We’ve now unbroken it. (#9371) The read-only tab dialog no longer treats Escape to mean “please yes, kill the read-only tab” (#9573) (thanks @Don-Vito!) You can now duplicate panes/tabs that have not yet told us their working directory (because we already know which one we started them in…) (#9397) (thanks @Don-Vito!) The settings UI sidebar will no longer appear as floating text over a transparent background (#9752) If you try to (with a key binding) switch to a tab that does not exist, we will no longer send the resulting control sequence into the terminal (#9781) (thanks @Don-Vito!) The arrow keys will no longer dismiss the tab renamer (oops) (#9633) (thanks @Don-Vito!) The tab close menu will no longer circumvent read-only panes (#9571) (thanks @Don-Vito!) We now propagate taskbar progress state in more places, so they should be more reliable (#9779) (thanks @Don-Vito!) Reliability The browse buttons will no longer cause a crash when you’re running as Administrator (ugh) (#9760) We’re going to immediately cease and desist shouting at you about totally valid font names (#9734) Font fallback used to be detected by string comparison, so “JetBrains Mono” and “Jetbrains Mono” were considered to be different… Sometimes we couldn’t find Cascadia, even though it’s in our package… We did not support localized names for fonts, so we thought that “?? ????” and “MS Gothic” were two different fonts (they are not) We’ve resolved a resource leak that resulted in Terminal slowing down, down, down over time (#9729) This is @lhecker‘s first commit since he officially joined the team! Woo! We will finally no longer crash when you display a bunch of wide glyphs and resize like crazy (MSFT !5903250) (#4907) We’ve fixed a crash in the pattern buffer (thanks Miles O’Brien) (#9618) App package fragments in invalid folders will no longer trip us up (#9477) The shell extension lost 50% of its weight (yay!) (#9552) We’ve shaved 120kb off OpenConsole.exe (#9581) Terminal will no longer crash if you write weird empty nested commands in your settings.json file (#9495) (thanks @Don-Vito!) Selection We (well, @Don-Vito) fixed so many issues in selection that we’re giving it its own subcategory. Shift + multiple clicks will now work more reasonably (#9403); multi-click selection is now more reliable (#9455); selection start (#9727) and drag (#9790) have been vetted and fixed where appropriate. Visual fit and finish The maximize/restore button will now actually display the right tooltip when maximized (#9412) (thanks @Chips1234!) We’ve fixed the bug where the tab switcher/command palette displayed chevrons and icons in all the wrong places (#9487) (thanks @Don-Vito!) The actions page no longer has a strange gap on the left (#9780) (thanks @Don-Vito!) The settings tab’s close menu item looked different from everyone else’s; now it does not (#9324) The close button now fades to the correct color (#9763) (thanks @BreeceW!) The tab bar has been given some horizontal breathing room (#9575) (thanks @gabrielconl!) DOWNLOAD Download the client from Github here. via DrWindows Source: Microsoft releases Windows Terminal 1.7.1033.0 with Settings UI updates, more
  24. Windows Terminal Preview 1.4 brings embedded hyperlinks support, version 1.3 generally available Microsoft has released new versions of Windows Terminal both for general users and those using the preview version. For general users, there's version 1.3, which includes all the features that were made available in preview last month, including a command palette, a tab switcher, expanded tab color settings, and more. If you're trying out the preview, though, you're getting version 1.4. This release also includes a handful of additions, starting with the support for jump lists. This allows the Windows Terminal Preview to launch with a specific profile from the start menu or task bar. The update also brings hyperlink support for embedded hyperlinks, which will now appear with an underline. They can be opened by holding the Ctrl key while clicking on them. Support for automatic detection of plain text hyperlinks is expected to arrive soon. Then there is the support for rendering blink graphic using the SGR 5 attribute. This allows adding fun blinking displays inside the text buffer. Art via ASCII Art Archive There's also a handful of bug fixes in this release: Vim will no longer start in replace mode. The Terminal will no longer crash when selecting an out-of-bounds range through Narrator or NVDA. If you installed Windows Terminal through the Microsoft Store, you should get the latest version automatically. If you prefer installing manually, you can grab the latest release from the GitHub project page. Windows Terminal Preview 1.4 brings embedded hyperlinks support, version 1.3 generally available
  25. Microsoft releases Windows Terminal Preview 1.2 with new focus mode feature and more Microsoft today announced the release of Windows Terminal Preview 1.2 with new focus mode, new always on top mode, support for font weights and more. Find the full change log below. What’s new in Windows Terminal Preview 1.2: Focus mode There is a new feature called focus mode that hides the tabs and title bar. This mode will only display the terminal content. To enable focus mode, you can add a key binding for toggleFocusMode in your settings.json file. This command is not bound by default. { "command": "toggleFocusMode", "keys": "shift+f11" } Always on top mode In addition to focus mode, you can enable Windows Terminal Preview to always be the topmost window. This can be done with the alwaysOnTop global setting as well as a key binding using the toggleAlwaysOnTop command. These are not bound by default. // Global setting "alwaysOnTop": true // Key binding { "command": "toggleAlwaysOnTop", "keys": "alt+shift+tab" } New commands New key binding commands have been added to give you more flexibility when interacting with your terminal. Set tab color You can set the color of your focused tab with the setTabColor command. This command uses the color property to define which color you’d like, which accepts a color in hex format, i.e. #rgb or #rrggbb. This command is not bound by default. { "command": { "action": "setTabColor", "color": "#ffffff" }, "keys": "ctrl+a" } Open tab color picker A new command has been added that allows you to open the tab color picker menu. This can be done with the openTabColorPicker command. If you want to color a tab with your mouse, you can right click on the tab to access the color picker. This command is not bound by default. { "command": "openTabColorPicker", "keys": "ctrl+b" } Rename tab You can rename the focused tab with the renameTab command (thanks ggadget6!). You can also right click or double click on the tab to rename it. This command is not bound by default. { "command": "renameTab", "keys": "ctrl+c" } Toggle retro terminal effects You can toggle the retro terminal effects that add scanlines and a glow to the text with the toggleRetroEffect command. This enables the experimental.retroTerminalEffect profile setting. This command is not bound by default. { "command": "toggleRetroEffect", "keys": "ctrl+d" } Cascadia Code font weights Cascadia Code now has font weights! You can enable these font weights in Windows Terminal Preview by using the fontWeight profile setting. "fontWeight": "light" Command palette update The command palette is almost complete! We are currently ironing out a few more bugs, but if you’d like to play with it, you can add the commandPalette command to your key bindings and invoke it using your keyboard. This command is not bound by default. { "command": "commandPalette", "keys": "ctrl+shift+p" } Settings UI design We have been actively working on the settings UI and have narrowed down on a design. The design is pictured below and the spec can be found here. Miscellaneous You can now use nt, sp, and ft as command line arguments for new tab, split pane, and focus tab, respectively. We now have proper logos for high contrast mode. There are now warnings for pasting large amounts of text and text with multiple lines. More information on disabling these warnings can be found on the global settings docs page. Bug fixes: You can now run wt as an Administrator from the Run dialog with Ctrl+Shift+Enter. Printing large amounts of text in WSL is 20% faster! The terminal will no longer scroll to the bottom when there is output if you are scrolled up or have a selection. The pseudoconsole will now forward colors and styles emitted by applications with higher fidelity, thus greatly improving color representation. You can download the Windows Terminal Preview 1.2 here from Microsoft Store. Source: Microsoft Microsoft releases Windows Terminal Preview 1.2 with new focus mode feature and more
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