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  1. Hard_Configurator is a graphical user interface for advanced users only to manage Software Restriction Policies (SRP) and harden Windows Home editions from Vista up. This program can configure Windows built-in security to harden the system. When you close Hard_Configurator, it closes all its processes. The real-time protection comes from the reconfigured Windows settings. Hard_Configurator can be seen as a Medium Integrity Level smart default-deny setup, which is based on SRP + Application Reputation Service (forced SmartScreen) + Windows hardening settings (restricting vulnerable features). Hard_Configurator makes changes in Windows Registry to accomplish the tasks enumerated below: Most of what Hard_Configurator does can be accomplished with the registry. A System Restore point will be automatically created, and we recommend you also back up your registry. Once again, this is for advanced users who know what they're doing. Anyway, with Hard_Configurator, it can be done more quickly and safely. Also, the user can quickly apply custom settings saved in profiles. There is a Restore Windows Default and Uninstall built into the GUI. Changelog: Version 6.0.0.0 (stable) Home: https://hard-configurator.com/ GitHub: https://github.com/AndyFul/Hard_Configurator Help Files: https://hard-configurator.com/helpfiles/ Manual: https://github.com/AndyFul/Hard_Configurator/blob/master/Documentation/Hard_Configurator - Manual.pdf FAQ: https://github.com/AndyFul/Hard_Configurator/blob/master/Documentation/Hard_Configurator FAQ.pdf ConfigureDefender Manual: https://docs.google.com/document/d/1UcJKOVNstjFlzdjl40s_UNgmY4E2R9T8akar9lGvoT0/export?format=pdf Changelog: https://github.com/AndyFul/Hard_Configurator/blob/master/What_is_new.txt Download Page: https://hard-configurator.com/download/ Download: https://github.com/AndyFul/Hard_Configurator/blob/master/Hard_Configurator_setup_6.0.0.0.exe
  2. Microsoft appears to be readying a new Windows Defender Preview app for Windows 11, according to a tweet by Alumia. The app has the code-name GibraltarApp and appears to be rebuilt using WPF and XAML. It will replace the current inbox app in Windows 11. It is claimed to offer “simple, seamless and personalized protection” to users and is expected to roll out to Windows Insiders in the near future. via Deskmodder Microsoft appears to be working on a new Windows Defender app for Windows 11
  3. It's been a few weeks since Windows 11 started rolling out generally (check out our review here), but since it's being distributed in a staggered manner, not everyone has it yet, even if they're on a supported machine. Although there are ways to skip the queue and trigger the update immediately, it's perhaps advisable to know what you're getting into before you decide to make the jump to Microsoft's latest OS. This is exactly why we have been discussing Windows 11's features in more detail in our ongoing Closer Look series. So far, we have taken a look at Search, Widgets, the Start menu, Snap Layouts and Snap Groups, the Taskbar, quick settings and notifications, Virtual Desktops, power and battery settings, default apps configurations, File Explorer, context menus, Teams integration, the updated Clock app in Windows 11, the Microsoft Store, the Snipping Tool, the Paint app refresh, the lock screen, the revamped Photos app, and the voice typing experience. Today, we'll be discussing storage settings in Windows 11. For the purpose of this hands-on, we'll be taking a look at the generally available Windows 11 build versus a publicly available and up-to-date Windows 10 (version 21H1 build 19043.1288). Although we usually follow a format in our Closer Look articles where we first discuss the Windows 10 offerings before comparing it to Windows 11, we'll be deviating a bit from that this time because, frankly, it's not worth it considering there are smaller enhancements here and there rather than a full revamp. Storage settings in Windows 11 When you launch storage settings in Windows 11, you'll notice that the landing page has been redesigned. Now, you get the most essential information - which is your drive's storage space on the top -, while other information is nested at the bottom. For some reason, Windows 10 showed Storage Sense at top, which is fortunately not the case here. Below the drive's storage, you'll get some more granular categories such as Apps & features and Temporary files, but if you want to see more categories, you'll be directed to a dedicated page rather than a list being populated on the same page like Windows 10. The nesting of information in menus that you can expand according to your liking is a very neat touch. It means that you can now view all essential data on the same page without scrolling and can dive into specific settings only if you want too. Space is utilized very smartly here, and I'm a big fan of these changes, particularly because it does not require me to scroll past or even see settings that I barely use. Temporary files management in Windows 11 If you click on any of the dedicated categories, you'll be taken to their respective dedicated page. I noticed that Microsoft has made some nifty changes to the color contrast here so now it's easier to read highlighted content, and there's a clear division between each list item too. Storage Sense in Windows 11 Apart from offering the regular configurations present in Windows 10 already, Storage Sense now integrates directly with your locally available OneDrive content too. It offers you the ability to make files online-only if your don't open them for more than a specific amount of time. Personally, I'm a bit paranoid about automatic deletion of files from local or cloud storage, so I don't use Storage Sense, but Microsoft offers a decent set of options for those who feel the need for this capability. Cleanup recommendations in Windows 11 Storage settings in Windows 11 provides a handy "Cleanup recommendations" section too, which does exactly what the name implies. It offers you recommendations about deleting temporary files, large or unused files, files synced to the cloud, and apps that you haven't used recently. I think this is a decent option to have if you want to quickly free up small amounts of storage while having manual control over what you are deleting. Going back to the landing page of the Storage settings menu, you'll notice that all of the capabilities from Windows 10 have been carried over and are now nested under "Advanced storage settings". That said, there are a couple of changes that I'd like to highlight. New Disks & volumes pages in Windows 11 There is a new dedicated page called "Disks & volumes". This shows you high-level information about your storage device, its partitions, and their respective health statuses at a glance. You can also click on any partition to view its properties such as BitLocker encryption status and also change the label. I find this to be a very useful page even though it's not part of my daily workflows. Backup options in Windows 11 "View backup options" from Windows 10 has been replaced by "Backup options" in Windows 11. It now redirects to the Windows Backup page, from where you can backup your content to OneDrive, and remember apps and preferences. Windows 10 also offered an option called "Backup using File History", and while that setting can still be accessed using the native UI, it's no longer directly visible inside Storage settings. I'm assuming that this was done due to low usage and to push people towards OneDrive backups, but this is just speculation on my part. New UI for Storage Spaces in WIndows 11 Another thing I noted was that while Windows 10 also allows you to create Storage Spaces where you can store your files redundantly across different drives via storage pools, it did so via the legacy Windows interface that opens in a dedicated window. Microsoft has changed this up significantly in Windows 11 so that you can now configure this capability directly inside the Storage settings page, complete with a native Windows 11-look. I know it doesn't make a huge difference, but I think it's a step in the right direction in terms of giving the OS a consistent look and feel. Unfortunately, this change has not carried over to "Drive optimization", which still opens a dedicated legacy UI. Yes, it has rounded corners but it's outside of the native Windows 11 Settings app, which is a bit jarring. Overall, I think that although Microsoft hasn't treated Storage settings to a full revamp, it has still made some notable and positive changes to the overall UI. Whitespace is utilized much better and the nested menus ensure that you can easily find what you're looking for. I welcome the tighter integration with OneDrive as it also gives a more unified feel across Microsoft products. The new pages for Disks & volumes as well as Storage Spaces are decent changes and tie in well with the overall Windows 11 design, while providing useful capabilities. Some may bemoan the absence of backup via File History but I personally never used it so I don't miss it. Eitherway, the capability hasn't been completely removed so you can still access it if you want via the legacy Windows UI. Closer Look: Storage settings in Windows 11
  4. Microsoft yesterday released Windows 11 Build 22483 to the Dev Channel Insiders. This build includes 7th anniversary badges, the ability to right-click on either “Recommended” or the “More” button in Start and several bug fixes. Microsoft today announced the release of ISO images of Windows 11 Build 22483, you can download it here. What’s new in Windows 11 Build 22483: 7TH ANNIVERSARY BADGE EXCLUSIVELY FOR WINDOWS INSIDERS To continue celebrating our anniversary this week, we will begin rolling out 7th anniversary badge. Windows Insiders will soon see it in the Feedback Hub achievements section in the coming weeks. Thank you all for participating and supporting Windows Insider Program! 7th anniversary badge for Windows Insiders. CHANGES AND IMPROVEMENTS We’ve added the ability to right-click on either “Recommended” or the “More” button in Start to refresh the items show there. FIXES [Search] Fixed an issue that was causing Search to appear black and not display any content below the search box. [Settings] Searching for “display” will now return Display Settings. [Other] Trying to access the Linux entry for WSL in File Explorer’s navigation pane should no longer pop up an error saying “wsl.localhost is unavailable, insufficient resources exist” on ARM64 PCs. Fixed an issue that was causing cellular data to not work on certain devices in recent Dev Channel builds. Addressed an issue with NTFS when the USN journal was enabled, where it was doing extra unnecessary action with each write, impacting I/O performance. Made some small improvements to keyboard navigation and screen reader usage of Performance Monitor. Webview2 processes should now be properly grouped with the application using it in Task Manager’s Processes tab. Fixed an issue that was causing the Publisher column in Task Manager to not retrieve publisher names. NOTE: Some fixes noted here in Insider Preview builds from the active development branch may make their way into the servicing updates for the released version of Windows 11 that became generally available on October 5th. KNOWN ISSUES [General] Users updating from Builds 22000.xxx, or earlier, to newer Dev Channel builds using the latest Dev Channel ISO, may receive the following warning message: The build you are trying to install is Flight Signed. To continue installing, enable flight signing. If you receive this message, press the Enable button, reboot the PC, and retry the update. Some users may experience their screen and sleep timeouts being reduced. We’re investigating the potential impact that shorter screen and sleep timeouts could have on energy consumption. We’re investigating reports from Insiders that the Processes tab in Task Manager is blank sometimes. We’re working on a fix for an issue causing some devices to bugcheck with SYSTEM_SERVICE_EXCPTION when updating, starting with the previous build. If hit this issue previously, try rebooting and re-trying the update. We’re investigating reports from Insiders that Xbox Game Pass games are failing to install with error 0x00000001. [Start] In some cases, you might be unable to enter text when using Search from Start or the Taskbar. If you experience the issue, press WIN + R on the keyboard to launch the Run dialog box, then close it. [Taskbar] The Taskbar will sometimes flicker when switching input methods. We’re working on the fix for an issue causing tooltips to appear in an unexpected location after hovering over the Taskbar corner. [Search] After clicking the Search icon on the Taskbar, the Search panel may not open. If this occurs, restart the “Windows Explorer” process, and open the search panel again. [Quick Settings] We’re investigating reports from Insiders that the volume and brightness sliders aren’t displaying properly in Quick Settings. Source: Microsoft You can now download Windows 11 Build 22483 ISO image
  5. StartAllBack has been updated to 3.0, you may remember this program by the name StartIsBack, well according to the developer it now has a new name and a new focus for Windows 11 UI shortcomings that are plaguing early adopters. Namely: the stubborn taskbar, slow File Explorer with cut context menus and the "quite cringe start menu" (their words, not ours). So what does it do? StartAllBack restores taskbar from Windows 10, adopted with Windows 11 features and look. It restores the File Explorer UI and context menus, improved with Mica and Acrylic effects, as well as the classic start menu derived from Windows 7. That last point is the kicker, this app appears to mostly emulate the Windows 7 Start menu. So if you are looking for an app to restore the Windows 10 Start menu in Windows 11, this is not for you. Here is the changelog: Improved Search, Task View, Widgets, Chat buttons Added Control Center optional system tray icon Added volume control via mouse wheel on volume tray icon StartAllBack costs $4.99, or $1.50 if you are upgrading from StartIsBack. The app is also included in the Rectify 11 project, which aims to provide Windows 11 clean installs with some visual fixes, as well as including StartAllBack as the default Start menu. We have five licenses of StartAllBack to give away, all you have to do is ensure that you follow @NeowinFeed on Twitter and retweet the above tweet that we've embedded, alternatively if you are blocking javascript, here's a link to it. We'll be using the Tweet to draw winners sometime next week! StartAllBack 3.0 released to address Windows 11 UI shortcomings, and a giveaway
  6. If you're an AMD Ryzen CPU user running Windows 11, there's some good news for you today. The company has released its latest chipset driver version 3.10.08.506 and it comes with the performance patch for a Windows 11 issue that was causing the release version of the OS to not properly schedule the fastest available cores appropriately due to a problem with the Collaborative Processor Performance Control (CPPC) mechanism. As a result, applications that weren't very threaded would lose performance. The issue was one of the two problems - the other one being an L3 cache latency issue - that were noted on Zen CPUs. You can read about these in detail in the original report here. In its release notes for the 3.10.08.506 driver, AMD says: Restores intended function and behavior of UEFI CPPC2 (“preferred core”) in Windows® 11 build 22000.189 (or newer) on AMD processors. The driver adds a new Ryzen Power Plan 7.0.3.5 which comes optimized for Windows 11 which should fix this CPPC2 bug. While the new driver patches performance issues on Windows 11, it is also available for Windows 10 on all Zen-based systems. However, on Windows 11, the driver is only compatible with Zen+-based CPUs and newer, and it makes sense since anything older than Zen+ isn't supported on Windows 11 either way. In terms of chipset support, all available Zen-based chipsets are supported by this driver. The driver also fixes an OpenGL error pop-up and installs a new AMD UART Driver version 1.2.0.113 which adds support for 4Mbps baud rate. There are a few known issues too: Sometimes custom install fails to upgrade to latest drivers. Text alignment issues may be seen on Russian language. Manual system restart required on Non-English OS after the installation is complete. Windows® Installer pop-up message may appear during the installation. Uninstall summary log may incorrectly show uninstall status as fail on non-English OS. May observe a pop-up message "AMD Chipset Software is not responding" when the installer is launched and UI screen is clicked. If you wish to download the new 3.10.08.506 chipset driver, head over to AMD's official site where you can find the relevant links. AMD's latest chipset driver fixes Windows 11 CPPC2 issues on Ryzen
  7. Microsoft has released the optional KB5006746 cumulative update preview for Windows 11, fixing sixty-four issues, including AMD CPU performance and gaming issues. This cumulative update preview is part of Microsoft's scheduled October 2021 monthly "C" updates, allowing Windows 11 users to test the upcoming fixes being released on September 9th as part of Patch Tuesday. Unlike the Patch Tuesday updates, schedule "C" updates are optional and only contain bug fixes and performance improvements but no security updates. To install this update, you need to go to Settings > Windows Update and manually 'Check for updates.' As this is an optional update, Windows will not install it until you click on the 'Download now' button, as shown below. Windows Update offering the KB5006746 update Windows 11 users can also manually download and install the KB5006746 preview update from the Microsoft Update Catalog. Gaming performance issues fixed This update fixes numerous issues with gaming performance in Windows 11. Since Windows 11's release, users have been complaining of noticeable performance issues with AMD Ryzen CPUs. In a support article published by AMD, it was explained that these issues are caused by "L3 cache latency may increase for some applications" and "UEFI CPPC2 ("preferred core") may not preferentially schedule threads on a processor's fastest core." "Addresses an L3 caching issue that might affect performance in some applications on devices that have AMD Ryzen processors after upgrading to Windows 11 (original release)," explains the release notes for today's update. With the KB5006746 update, Microsoft has also fixed an issue causing Bluetooth mice and keyboards to be slower than expected, which can adversely affect shooters and eSports games. Finally, Microsoft fixed an issue preventing users from using the Xbox Game Bar recording features. What's new in the Windows 10 KB5006746 update After installing the KB5006746 update, Windows 11 will have its build number changed to 22000.282 The Windows 10 KB5006746 cumulative update preview includes 64 improvements or fixes, with the thirteen highlighted changes listed below: Updates an issue that causes Internet Explorer to stop working when you type certain characters in the Input Method Editor (IME). Updates an issue that occurs when you try to rename a file in File Explorer using the new Japanese IME. Updates an issue that might distort the sound captured by voice assistants. Updates an issue that sometimes causes your lock screen background to appear black if you have set up a slideshow of pictures as your lock screen background. Updates an issue that might cause your Bluetooth mice and keyboards to respond slower than expected. Improves the time estimate for how long you might wait to use your device after it restarts. Updates an issue that might prevent you from using the Xbox Game Bar recording features. Updates an issue that causes some applications to run slower than usual after you upgrade to Windows 11 (original release). Updates an issue that prevents Narrator and other screen readers from announcing when the Start menu is open in certain cases. Updates an issue in that prevents the search window from appearing on a secondary monitor. Updates an issue that prevents you from opening multiple instances of an app using Shift and clicking on the app’s icon in the taskbar. Updates the visual design and animations of the Chat icon on the taskbar. Updates an issue for a small number of users that prevents the Start menu from working and prevents you from seeing the updated taskbar after upgrading to Windows 11 (original release). You can find a complete list of improves and fixes and detailed explanations of the known issues in the KB5006746 support bulletin. Windows 11 KB5006746 update fixes gaming performance issues
  8. Microsoft has released the first preview version of the Windows Subsystem for Android for Windows 11 Insiders, and one of the more interesting features is that you can sideload Android apps. The Windows Subsystem for Android is a new feature of Windows 11 that allows you to run native Android apps directly from the desktop in a virtualized environment. These apps will have graphics support, audio, and even network access, allowing you to play multiplayer games online. To install Android apps, Microsoft has partnered with Amazon to create the Amazon Appstore, which currently contains 50 curated apps. Amazon Appstore However, the Windows Subsystem for Android also allows you to sideload apps using the Android Debug Bridge (adb), theoretically allowing you to install any app you wish. How to sideload apps in Windows Subsystem for Android While the apps available in the Amazon Appstore have been curated by Microsoft to make sure they are bug-free and work well with the new Android feature, many other apps will work as well. The good news is that you can use sites like APKPure or APKMirror to download APKs and sideload them using ADB. To sideload an Android app in the Windows Subsystem for Android (WSA), please follow these steps: 1. Download the Android app you want from APKPure or APKMirror. 2. Download the Android SDK Platform-Tools for Windows and extract it to your hard drive. 3. Click on the Start menu and type Android. When the Windows Subsystem for Android search result is displayed, click on it, as shown in the image below. Opening the Windows Subsystem for Android 4. The Windows Subsystem for Android settings screen will now open. Scroll down and enable 'Developer mode' and then click on the 'Copy' button in the IP address field. If you do not see an IP address, click Refresh and try again. If you are still cannot see an IP address, open the 'Files' option at the top of the Settings to make sure the subsystem is enabled. Windows Subsystem for Android Settings 5. Open a command prompt and CD to the folder you extracted the platform tools. For example, if you extracted the tools to C:\Platform-tools, you would enter cd c:\platform-tools and press enter. 6. You will now be in the folder containing the Android SDK platform tools. Enter the command adb connect ipaddress, where the IP address is the one you copied in step 4. For example, to connect to the WSA running on my computer, you would enter adb connect 172.30.204.180. If you see an error about it not being authenticated, ignore the message. 7. Now you want to install the APK using the adb install apk command. For example, if your APK is named 'com.innersloth.spacemafia_2021.6.30-967_minAPI23(arm64-v8a,armeabi-v7a)(nodpi)_apkmirror.com.apk' and was saved in the Downloads folder, you would type: adb install %UserProfile%\downloads\com.innersloth.spacemafia_2021.6.30-967_minAPI23(arm64-v8a,armeabi-v7a)(nodpi)_apkmirror.com.apk Sideloading an APK in WSA 8. When you are done sideloading your apps, you will find them listed in your Start Menu. Sideloaded Among Us now available in the Windows 11 Start Menu 9. You can now close the command prompt. To launch your sideloaded apps, simply click on them from the Start Menu. Like apps installed through the Amazon Appstore, sideloaded apps will have network access and sound. Sus screenshot of the Among Us Android app At this time, not all sideloaded apps will work in WSA yet, so you may experience blank screens when you attempt to launch an app. Also, while it is possible to install the Google Play Store app on WSA, it will crash if you attempt to run it. Therefore, you will not be able to use any apps that rely on Google services. There are also many malicious Android apps floating around the Internet, so be careful of what you install as it is not clear what access Android apps have to the rest of the Windows environment. BleepingComputer has reached out to Microsoft with questions about sideloading apps but has not heard back at this time. Windows 11 Subsystem for Android lets you sideload apps - Here's how
  9. Microsoft is rolling out a fresh new build for Windows Insiders in the Dev channel, bringing build 22483 that includes a bunch of bug fixes and a tiny new feature. However, those waiting for Android app support might have to wait slightly longer, as support for running Android apps will first head to Beta channel users only. While it is odd that a new feature is first being tested in the Beta channel instead of the Dev channel, it is likely due to the fact that support for running Android apps might be being readied for the version of Windows 11 currently available publicly. It will be no surprise to see the feature make it to the Dev channel eventually. Additionally, some fixes made as part of today's build will also make it to the Beta and Release Preview channels, before eventually making it to the generally available version. In terms of features, there is just one small addition, which is the ability to right-click on the “Recommended” or the “More” button in Start to refresh the items in the list. There is also a new 7th-anniversary badge in the Feedback Hub for Windows Insiders, though that has nothing to do with the build. Here is the complete list of fixes: [Search] Fixed an issue that was causing Search to appear black and not display any content below the search box. [Settings] Searching for “display” will now return Display Settings. [Other] Trying to access the Linux entry for WSL in File Explorer’s navigation pane should no longer pop up an error saying “wsl.localhost is unavailable, insufficient resources exist” on ARM64 PCs. Fixed an issue that was causing cellular data to not work on certain devices in recent Dev Channel builds. Addressed an issue with NTFS when the USN journal was enabled, where it was doing extra unnecessary action with each write, impacting I/O performance. Made some small improvements to keyboard navigation and screen reader usage of Performance Monitor. Webview2 processes should now be properly grouped with the application using it in Task Manager’s Processes tab. Fixed an issue that was causing the Publisher column in Task Manager to not retrieve publisher names. And here is the list of known issues, some of which have been added thanks to feedback from Insiders running the previously available Dev channel build: [General] Users updating from Builds 22000.xxx, or earlier, to newer Dev Channel builds using the latest Dev Channel ISO, may receive the following warning message: The build you are trying to install is Flight Signed. To continue installing, enable flight signing. If you receive this message, press the Enable button, reboot the PC, and retry the update. Some users may experience their screen and sleep timeouts being reduced. We’re investigating the potential impact that shorter screen and sleep timeouts could have on energy consumption. We’re investigating reports from Insiders that the Processes tab in Task Manager is blank sometimes. We’re working on a fix for an issue causing some devices to bugcheck with SYSTEM_SERVICE_EXCPTION when updating, starting with the previous build. If hit this issue previously, try rebooting and re-trying the update. We’re investigating reports from Insiders that Xbox Game Pass games are failing to install with error 0x00000001. [Start] In some cases, you might be unable to enter text when using Search from Start or the Taskbar. If you experience the issue, press WIN + R on the keyboard to launch the Run dialog box, then close it. [Taskbar] The Taskbar will sometimes flicker when switching input methods. We’re working on the fix for an issue causing tooltips to appear in an unexpected location after hovering over the Taskbar corner. [Search] After clicking the Search icon on the Taskbar, the Search panel may not open. If this occurs, restart the “Windows Explorer” process, and open the search panel again. [Quick Settings] We’re investigating reports from Insiders that the volume and brightness sliders aren’t displaying properly in Quick Settings. Beta channel users recently received Windows 11 build 22000.282 that brought with it a ton of fixes. Expect more to be on the way as the firm further polishes the OS for a wider rollout in the next few months. With the Windows Subsystem for Android heading to these builds, it will not be surprising to see Android app support ship to general consumers before the next major update to the OS. Windows 11 build 22483 for Dev channel users brings more bug fixes
  10. Microsoft has released its first preview build of the Windows Subsystem for Android, allowing you to run Android apps directly on your desktop. Like the Windows Subsystem for Linux, the Windows Subsystem for Android allows you to run native Android apps in a virtualized environment with sound, graphics, and network connectivity. For the initial release, Microsoft has partnered with Amazon to bring fifty curated apps that users can test, with more coming in the future. "We have partnered with Amazon and popular app developers to curate 50 apps for Windows Insiders to test and validate across a broad set of hardware. We will release new apps through Windows Insider Program updates in the coming months," announced Microsoft today. The preview is only available to Windows 11 Insiders in the 'Beta' channel who have virtualization enabled on their devices, run Windows 11 in the Beta channel, the operating system configured for the USA region, and USA Amazon account, and the device must meet the minimum system requirements. First look at the Windows Subsystem for Android Rather than being a separate component, the Windows Subsystem for Android is installed by and coupled with the Amazon Appstore app. The Amazon Appstore can be installed through the Microsoft Store, and when installed, will also install the Windows Subsystem for Android in Windows 11. Amazon Appstore installing the Windows Subsystem for Android Once the Windows Subsystem for Android is installed, you can open and log into the Amazon Appstore, which acts as the front end for the new feature. Once the Amazon Appstore opens, you can install whatever apps you want, which is mostly games at this point. Amazon Appstore in Windows 11 Any apps that you install will also appear in the Start Menu, as shown below. Android apps in the Start Menu When the Android app is launched, it will show up in a dedicated window on your desktop that you can resize as large as you like. Hungry Shark Android app running in Windows 11 While using the apps, you will hold and press the mouse button and slide the cursor to emulate swipes with your fingers. To tap on the screen, you would click with the mouse button. At first, this felt unusual, but you quickly get used to the experience. As this is the first release of the Windows Subsystem for Android, the apps are pretty limited, with them mostly being games and children's content. The non-game apps included with this release are Yahoo Mail, United Airlines, Scanner Radio Pro, Comics, Kindle for Android, Alaska Airlines, BBC Sounds, The Washington Post, and Flight Tracker24. For the most part, the apps run ok but definitely need improvement. For example, when when running Android games in full screen, you will notice that there is quite a bit of lag with noticeable delays as you perform actions. However, Microsoft themselves state this is "Day 1" for the Android feature, so we will see increased performance as times goes on, bugs are fixed, and new features introduced Hands on with Microsoft's Android app support in Windows 11
  11. With Windows 11, Microsoft has finally redesigned the modern Settings app. The new Settings app uses a sidebar and breadcrumbs to help users easily navigate between different pages, and it also features new controls for customization, managing network, power usage, disk management, and more. The settings app has been significantly improved, but several Control Panel features are still missing. Thankfully, Windows 11 still comes with the Control Panel and File Explorer-based advanced configuration page called "God Mode" that allows you to easily access all advanced tools, features, and tasks. God mode With God mode, you can access the advanced management features in one location and it's better than the modern settings. Enable God Mode in Windows 11 To access God Mode in Windows 10, create a special shortcut folder, as highlighted in the steps below: On the desktop, right-click anywhere. Select “New” option and click on "Folder" Right-click the new folder. Rename the folder to the following command: GodMode.{ED7BA470-8E54-465E-825C-99712043E01C} Press enter. You can double-click on this folder to open God Mode. God mode in Windows 11 Once done, you will be presented with a page similar to the above screenshot. As you can see, Windows 11's God mode offers a familiar experience and it also restores the classic view of File Explorer. To improve the experience, you can also use CLSID, a unique identifier to access other settings pages directly from the desktop. For example, you can create folder with the name "{D20EA4E1-3957-11d2-A40B-0C5020524153}" to open Administrative Tools, such as the defragmentation tool, disk format options, etc. You can also try these values: Network - {F02C1A0D-BE21-4350-88B0-7367FC96EF3C} Bluetooth - {28803F59-3A75-4058-995F-4EE5503B023C} Mouse properties - {6C8EEC18-8D75-41B2-A177-8831D59D2D50} Personalization - {ED834ED6-4B5A-4bfe-8F11-A626DCB6A921} Troubleshooting - {C58C4893-3BE0-4B45-ABB5-A63E4B8C8651} How to unlock Windows 11's God Mode to access advanced settings
  12. The Start Menu and Widgets maybe the most unpopular changes that Microsoft introduced in its new operating system. But, for many people, the lack of an option to move the Windows 11 Taskbar, is just as frustrating. Unlike its predecessors, Windows 11 does not let you drag the Taskbar to the sides or the top. I think it is a silly change, especially considering how the Redmond company is marketing the OS'personalization features. Fortunately, there are a few third-party tools that can help us overcome such limitations. Martin mentioned StarDock's Start11 as an option. That however is a premium application. Why should I pay for a feature that existed before and was removed needlessly? I hear you loud and clear, and if you want a free way to fix it, Taskbar11 fits the bill. The application is portable, so all you need to do is download the Taskbar11.exe and run it. The program's interface has some useful options, let's begin with the Taskbar setting. Click the Taskbar Position drop-down menu. Taskbar11 allows you to switch the Windows 11 Taskbar's position to the top. The flyout menus (pop-up right-click menus) drops-down correctly too. It's a shame that we can't move it to the sides, but I think we'll take what we got. Optionally, you may set the Taskbar size to Small, Medium or Large. Now, these options don't actually change the size of the bar, it just reduces the size of the icons. The next setting, Taskbar Indentation, lets you move the Taskbar and Start Menu to the left edge of the screen, just like in previous Windows iterations. Don't like the default icons Microsoft has slapped onto the Taskbar? You can use Taskbar11 to disable the Search, Task View, Widgets and Chat buttons. Similarly, you can hide the Pen menu, Touch keyboard and the Virtual Touchpad. Note: Setting it to the Small Size results in a visual bug, the system tray's clock is sort of hidden partially. The Large Size has a problem too, the icons appear to be blurry when you use the option. You don't need this tool for toggling the Taskbar icons, or to change its alignment. Windows 11's built-in options allows you to do this too, just open the Settings app, switch to Personalization > Taskbar, and customize it as necessary. Select the option that you want to change in Taskbar11, and click the Save button at the bottom of the Window. Your Taskbar will disappear briefly, and flash right back into place. Don't worry about it, the program is just restarting the Explorer.exe process to apply the modifications you selected. As mentioned earlier, the program is portable, so it doesn't need to be running in the background, you may close it after making the changes. Taskbar11 is an open-source program. There is another open-source software, called Windows11DragAndDropToTaskbarFix, that does a similar job. However, this tool is currently detected as a Trojan by Kaspersky and Zone Alarm (VirusTotal). Windows Defender seems to think it is harmless, so I think it is a false positive, but I'll leave you to be the judge. Thanks, Joe for the tip! Move the Windows 11 Taskbar to the top and change the icon size with Taskbar11
  13. Windows 11 is a major design break from Windows 10, but not everyone are fans of the new design, though few have the ability to do anything about it. Not everyone are Windows hacker Firecube however, who has started the Rectify 11 project, which aims to fix the design issues with Windows 11. He has released an ISO of Windows 11 which bundles a new setup theme, new icons for MMC, system tools and start, and the StartisBack start menu replacement. A future update will include a Fluent Windows Recovery Environment. Of course, all of this comes without warranty – find out more at his Twitter thread here (which includes a link to his Discord server). Designer aims to fix Windows 11 with Rectify 11 project
  14. vissha

    StartAllBack 2.9.95 RC

    Introducing StartAllBack: Windows 11 from better timeline, Embrace, enhance, unsweep classic UI from under the rug. Restore and improve taskbar • Show labels on task icons • Adjust icon size and margins • Move taskbar to top, left or right edges • Drag and drop stuff onto taskbar • Center task icons but keep Start button on the left • Split into segments, use dynamic translucency • Separate corner icons with Windows 7/10 UI Restore and improve File Explorer UI • Ribbon and Command Bar revamped with translucent effects • Details pane on bottom • Old search box (the one which works) • Dark mode support for more dialogs Restore and improve context menus • All new look with rounded acrylic menus • Fast and responsive taskbar menus • New fonts, better touch support Restore and improve start menu • Launch apps and go to system places in one click • Navigate dropdown menus like a boss • Enjoy fast and reliable search Finally, lightweight styling and UI consistency • Enjoy Windows 7, Windows 10 and third-party taskbar and start menu styles • Fix UI inconsistencies in Win32 apps • Don't be blue: recolor UI in all windows apps • Negative resource usage: fewer RAM used, fewer processes started OS: Windows 11 Home: https://www.startallback.com/ Downloads: Installer: https://s3.amazonaws.com/startisback/StartAllBack_2.9.95_setup.exe Installer + Fix: Site: https://www.mirrored.to Sharecode [?]: /files/151QAQ1O/StartAllBack.2.9.95.RC_-_Installer___Fix.rar_links
  15. A couple of days ago, Microsoft released a new Windows 11 Insider build, version 22000.282 to the Beta and Release Preview channels. The update carried plenty of changes and improvements with perhaps the most important one being a performance fix for AMD's Ryzen CPUs that were exhibiting a massive degradation in the L3 cache latency output ever since the first public release of the OS. In fact, the problem apparently was amplified after the Patch Tuesday update. This particular issue is different from the performance loss seen with Virtualization-based Security (VBS) enabled which is a consequence of the lack of MBEC on older CPUs. That is why, as confirmed by AIDA64 itself, even the latest Zen 3-based parts like the Ryzen 9 5900X were susceptible to this performance bug, even though Zen 3 is officially supported by Microsoft for Windows 11, and has significant architectural upgrades in terms of cache performance over its predecessors. Now that the performance patch for the issue has been released with the new Build 22000.282 (KB5006746), AIDA64 decided to test the new build as well to see if indeed Microsoft's claims are correct. Three test runs were done to measure the L3 cache latency under Windows 10, Windows 11 pre-patch, and Windows 11 post-patch environments. Unlike last time, a Zen 2-based Ryzen 9 PRO 3900 processor paired with a dual-channel DDR4-2667 kit on an AORUS X570 motherboard was used for the tests. The results are provided in the images below (click to enlarge): The obtained results show that the patch has worked like a charm and the L3 performance of Ryzen CPUs after this update is back up to where they should be. Hence, all Windows 11 insiders who are using a Ryzen-based PC should probably upgrade to this build. Source: AIDA64 (Twitter) AIDA64 confirms Windows 11 performance patch for AMD's Ryzen L3 issue works like magic
  16. Windows 11 has been rolling out for around 2 weeks to regular users, but the operating system continues to have a number of issues. Microsoft recently rollout out Windows 11 Build 22000.282 to Beta and Release Preview Channel Insiders which contains a large number of fixes, including for the AMD performance problem, and that should be rolling out to regular Windows 11 users by the end of the month. The operating system however has other performance issues, including one users are complaining about affecting File Explorer. Users are complaining of poor performance when they drag to select files, a rather basic feature of File Explorer. Microsoft says their investigation revealed that the Command Bar was doing unnecessary calculations when navigating to folders, causing an unexpected increase decrease in performance. A fix for this is currently being tested in Windows 11 Insider Preview Build 22478 which is currently in the Dev channel. If no serious issues show up the fix will presumable be backported to Windows 11 Build 22000. via WindowsLatest Microsoft is testing fix for Windows 11 File Explorer performance issue in Dev channel
  17. Windows 11's general rollout began a couple of weeks ago (check out our review here), but since it's a staggered release, not everyone got access to it on day one. While there are ways to trigger the update immediately, it's worth knowing what's in store before you decide to do so. This is why we have been discussing Windows 11's new features and capabilities in our ongoing Closer Look series for the past couple of months. So far, we have taken a look at Search, Widgets, the Start menu, Snap Layouts and Snap Groups, the Taskbar, quick settings and notifications, Virtual Desktops, power and battery settings, default apps configurations, File Explorer, context menus, Teams integration, the updated Clock app in Windows 11, the Microsoft Store, the Snipping Tool, the Paint app refresh, and the lock screen. Today, we'll be discussing the updated Photos app available in Windows 11. For the purpose of this hands-on, we'll be taking a look at the generally available Windows 11 build versus a publicly available and up-to-date Windows 10 (version 21H1 build 19043.1288). Landing page for Photos app in Windows 10 As usual, we'll start off with what's available presently in Windows 10. I'll be honest and say right off the bat that the Photos app is not part of my usual workflow. Image editing or even taking photos is not something I do on a daily basis, and the Photos app has been so slow and crash-prone in my previous brief experiences with it that I actually dread scenarios where I'm forced to use it. When you launch the Photos app, you'll see the Collections page where you'll see some groupings of photos at the top and images in chronological order in the bottom half of the screen. It can appear fairly cluttered but shows a decent amount of information. There are other tabs available too such as Albums, People, Folders, and Video Editor. Folders are essentially pointers to directories in Windows where you store images, while Albums are groupings of similar images based on date or anything else, really. You can add new Folders and Albums fairly easily too. The People tab is where you can utilize Microsoft's AI technology to automatically detect faces in images and group them together, but if you're privacy-conscious, you can simply choose not to enable it. That is the default configuration too. There is also a search bar at the top-center through which you can search for specific images, provided that you use decent keywords. Basic editing experience for Photos app in Windows 10 Before we go to the Video Editor tab, let's first wrap up the images section by talking about the image-editing experience. When you click on any image in the Photos app, it opens up in a dedicated window showing you some basic options such as zoom, delete, crop, rotate, share, and print. There are also a bunch of other options in the three-dotted menu on the far-right corner including a slideshow, file info, resize, set as desktop wallpaper, and more. But if all of this is not enough for you, there is also a dedicated Edit & Create drop-down that gives you some relatively advanced editing options including Edit, Draw, Add 3D effects, Add animated text, Create a video with music, and Edit with Paint 3D. Advanced image-editing options for Photos app in Windows 10 All of the aforementioned options provide what I would call an adequate set of image-editing capabilities. You'll see all the usual stuff including filters, lighting adjustments, drawing, effects from Microsoft's 3D library, fancy texts, integration with Paint 3D, and video editor. It's not meant for advanced users or professional users but it might scratch the Instagram bug in you if you're into that sort of stuff. Video editor in Photos app for Windows 10 Photos also has a basic video editor built-in. You can either use your existing photos to create a video project or start a new one from scratch. I haven't used it a lot but it is very similar to the image-editing experience because it borrows most of its capabilities including filters, 3D effects, and more. But there are also other video-specific configurations such as title cards, duration for frames, and motion that can zoom or pan into specific portions of the frame. You can also add music to your videos (obviously), change the aspect ratio, and export the video using hardware acceleration. Interestingly though, exports seem to be only available in MP4 format. Overall, the whole experience is not too advanced, and I think it's adequate for some basic use-cases. Settings for Photos app in Windows 10 Finally, we have a dedicated Settings page, which I think wastes a whole lot of space and requires you to scroll quite a bit to see all the available options. This is a complaint that I have with settings in most native system apps as well the OS settings UI so it's nothing surprising. It enables you integrate Photos with OneDrive, link duplicates, toggle mouse wheel to zoom, allow automatic generation of albums, indexing, and more. There's a decent amount of stuff to customize here, I just think it wastes a lot of space and it's difficult to find what you're looking for. The least it could do is add a search bar at the top to increase efficiency. If you're wondering why I spent so much time discussing the Photos app in Windows 10, that's because the Photos app in Windows 11 offers the same functionality and the changes are only cosmetic. A key point of our Closer Look series is to give our readers a view of the new features they'll be getting if they upgrade from Windows 10 to Windows 11 and what they'll be missing out on if they don't. In case of Photos, it turns out that you won't be missing out on anything except some UI changes. Landing page for Photos in Windows 11 When you launch the Photos app in Windows 11, you may not notice any difference right away. And that is because there have been no major changes made to the landing page, just some minor icon changes. You'll notice that all the icons on the top-right are fresh but offer exactly the same functionalities. The Collection, Albums, People, Folders, and Video Editor tabs are still there. The search bar just has rounded corners. That said, I did experience some bugs in my experience with the Photos app in Windows 11. The "Recent" and "On this day" album thumbnails won't show the image for me until I hover my cursor over it, and even when I do that, the images keep fading in and out. I though that this was because it has not loaded the images from OneDrive yet, but then I opened the album and all the images are loaded, so it's definitely not related to the availability of images. I haven't changed any settings in Photos on either Windows 10 or Windows 11 and both are integrated with OneDrive so this definitely seems like a bug. Basic image-editing experience for Photos in Windows 11 The dedicated basic image-editing experience is where you might start to notice more changes to the UI. All the available options have been moved to the center of the app and there is a new button to add images to your favorites collection too. I think this is a neat change and something that I may find a use-case for if I do get around to using Photos in my daily workflow. All the icons have been revamped but I have mixed feelings about them personally. I find it hard to figure out what an icons means. If I go from left to right in the image above, the icons are See all favorites, Zoom in, Zoom out, Rotate, Edit image, Draw, Delete, Add to favorites, File information, See more. Differentiating between the Edit image and Draw icons is a bit confusing for me. This also feeds into my thought process that Edit and Draw functionalities should be in a unified UI rather than being split, since they are both a part of the image editing experience overall. The three-dotted menu also offers integration with third-party Microsoft Store apps that you have downloaded on your device such as Picsart. It essentially acts as a launcher for those apps if you're inclined to use them for your image-editing workflow. There is also a dedicated button to view images in fullscreen, which is decent addition. You'll also notice that references to Paint 3D have been removed, because it is effectively been killed off, as we discussed last week. If you're wondering if other 3D options have been done away with too, that's not the case; they have simply been moved inside the three-dotted menu. It's clear that they are not a top priority for Microsoft right now. The cropping icon is missing too, which I think is a bit odd considering it's a capability that most image-editing tools that I have used offer at your fingertips, but all other settings seem to be intact. There is a new multi-viewing experience that allows you to compare multiple photos in the same UI and while Microsoft made a big deal about it in it's blog post, I think it's a fairly basic feature, because it does nothing on top of that really. The company could have expanded this functionality to include the creation of collages too, but this potential is not utilized. Advanced image-editing options for Photos app in Windows 10 The Edit and Draw settings have new icons too. Similar to the basic editing UI discussed before, Microsoft seems to have done away with text descriptions for icons completely unless you hover your cursor over them. This might make sense for many, but personally, I have mixed views as it requires me to familiarize myself with all of Microsoft's icons without any immediately visible textual hint. This is problematic not only because there is no standard set of icons used by companies all over the world but also because the Redmond tech giant itself isn't known for UI consistency either. Maybe I'll get used to it with the passage of time, but for now, it's just adding difficulty to an app that I'm not a fan of in the first place. Functionality-wise though, the editing experience is the same. Video editor in Photos for Windows 11 The video-editing experience is essentially the same as Windows 10 too. You'll get some new icons here and there but the overall functionality set is exactly the same. Exports are still limited to the MP4 file format too. There's not much else to talk about here. Settings UI for Photos in Windows 11 Unfortunately, the Settings UI hasn't received much of an update either. The Add a folder icon is new but the rest is the same. You still have to scroll a lot and there is no search bar. I wouldn't call the addition of a new icon a massive improvement as compared to Windows 10. Overall, the updated Photos app in Windows 11 still hasn't established a strong use-case for itself, at least in my opinion. It offers the same capabilities as Windows 10 and just furnishes the experience with some redesigned menus and icons. There are some nifty additions in there including the launcher-like integration with third-party photo-editing apps and multi-view UI but I think they could benefit from some maturity, especially the latter, which just feels shoehorned at this point. The Photos app still isn't as performant as I would like it to be and is occasionally buggy. The new icons will take some time getting used to and so will the redesigned menus. The image-editing tools are still fairly basic and as I discussed in a previous Closer Look, I just think it's strange that the company doesn't provide obfuscation capabilities in any of its image-related apps. Pro users who complained about lack of advanced video and image-editing functionalities and support for more file types in the Photos app on Windows 10 will have the same complaints with the Windows 11 revamp. Almost all of the modifications are related to cosmetics and the backend functionality remains mostly the same. If you're an active user of Photos on Windows 10, you're not missing out on much in that department by not upgrading to Windows 11. Closer Look: Photos app in Windows 11
  18. Windows 11, which has been released by Microsoft earlier this month, has a number of known issues that affect the performance of certain systems. One major issue affects AMD processors, which may see a performance drop by up to 15% on Microsoft's newest operating system. The situation worsened after the release of the first cumulative update for Windows 11 this Tuesday. A patch is already available for testing but stable version users need to wait a bit longer before it is made available to their machines. Microsoft confirmed another performance issue on Windows 11 this week. The company released build 22478 to the Developer channel, bringing new fluent emoji to the operating system and a number of fixes. One fix addresses the performance issue in File Explorer, which occurs when users navigate between folders in File Explorer. Fixed an issue where the command bar was doing unnecessary calculations when navigating to folders, causing an unexpected decrease in performance. This is also believed to be the root cause of performance issues when using drag to select files, as well as using the arrow keys to navigate in certain folders. Folder navigation is one of the core activities in File Explorer, considering that users need to navigate to different folders often to access files stored in those folders. Microsoft did not reveal details on the performance degradation, only that File Explorer's new Command Bar is performing unnecessary calculations. The Command Bar replaced the traditional Ribbon interface of File Explorer in Windows 10. The new File Explorer has usability issues, e.g. that it has two context menus instead of just one when users right-click. First, the new Microsoft designed one with just a few functions, and then the Windows 10 menu with all functions. The classic File Explorer context menu can be restored, however. Some of the options change depending on the type of folder or drive that is displayed. A CD or DVD drive may display additional options, e.g. eject, than a regular folder on a hard drive. Drag & drop operations, and keyboard navigation are always affected by the performance issue. There is no workaround for the issue currently. Affected users may use a third-party file manager for the time being. Options include recently reviewed apps such as Imperium, Sigma File Manager, or Altap Salamander. The fix is being tested in the developer build currently. Microsoft has not revealed an ETA for the update, but a likely target is the next cumulative update for Windows 11, which will be released on November 9, 2021. Closing Words It is usually a good idea to wait months before upgrading Windows to a new version. The smaller updates for Windows 10 that Microsoft released since 2020 may be an exception, as they happen to introduce less bugs and issues. Users who upgraded to Windows 11 this month face a number of issues, of which only some are confirmed officially by Microsoft. Windows 11 File Explorer may slow down PCs
  19. A new support page on Microsoft's support website provides instructions on installing Windows 11. A paragraph on the page includes instructions on upgrading Windows 10 devices that are not compatible with Windows 11's system requirements to Windows 11. When Microsoft announced Windows 11, it shocked part of the userbase with its updated system requirements for the operating system. Microsoft did not change requirements when it released previous versions of Windows. A Windows 7 PC of 2009 could very well run Windows 10, released in 2015. Windows 10 users may get incompatibility messages in Windows Updates or the PC Health Check application. Windows Update may display This PC doesn't currently meet all the system requirements for Windows 11, indicating that at least one component is not compatible. The PC Health Check app may reveal the components, but some users reported already that this was not the case on their systems. Users may download Windows 11 manually to install it, but incompatibilities may prevent the installation. Workarounds were discovered quickly to install Windows 11 on incompatible PCs. Microsoft confirmed that Windows 11 could be installed on incompatible devices, but that users should not do so. The company warned customers that incompatible Windows 11 devices would not receive support and that they were not eligible to receiving updates. The message sparked a heated debate: would incompatible Windows 11 PCs get regular security updates, or would Microsoft prevent these devices from receiving any updates. We know now that updates will be delivered, and that feature updates may not be delivered to incompatible devices. Still, the workarounds will likely continue to work on these devices so that future feature updates, the first will be released in about 12 months, can be installed on incompatible Windows 11 devices. Microsoft's official Windows 11 upgrade workaround for incompatible PCs All that is required is to set a single Registry value on the device that is not compatible. The Windows 11 installer will not check the processor or TPM component according to Microsoft. Other requirements, such as hard drive space, will still be checked. Note: Microsoft advises against installing Windows 11 on unsupported devices. A linked support page warns users that the devices may malfunction and that the devices are not guaranteed to receive updates. Your device might malfunction due to these compatibility or other issues. Devices that do not meet these system requirements will no longer be guaranteed to receive updates, including but not limited to security updates. Bypass the compatibility check Open the Start Menu. Type regedit.exe and start the Registry Editor once the results are displayed. Confirm the UAC prompt. Go to HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\Setup\MoSetup Right-click on MoSetup and select New > Dword (32-bit) Value. Name it AllowUpgradesWithUnsupportedTPMOrCPU. Double-click on the new Dword and set its value to 1. Restart the PC. Administrators may then upgrade to Windows 11 using installation media, which can be downloaded using our instructions (and not via Windows Update). Microsoft posts instructions for upgrading to Windows 11 on unsupported PCs
  20. A couple of days ago, VMware received an update to 16.2.0 build-18760230 that broke the dark mode, VMware has acknowledged this and plans to release a fix soon, but the interesting thing about this build is that it includes an undocumented change for the TPM requirement, essentially adding a software level TPM, rather than an emulated hardware one. If you have been using a Windows 11 virtual machine in VMware Workstation Pro with TPM enabled, you will be used to having to set and enter a password for each encrypted VM, but with this update you can now remove the encryption and add in the software level TPM flag instead. Fortunately, the flag also works in the free VMware Workstation Player. The following assumes you have not encrypted the VM further with BitLocker within Windows, if you have you may need to decrypt the drive first before performing the steps below. If you already added TPM to Windows 10 or 11: Ensure you are updated to version 16.2.0 (Pro - Player ~600mb) Open Edit virtual machine settings In the Hardware tab Remove the TPM In the Options tab click on Access Control, then Remove Encryption This will take some time depending on how large your VM is, when it completes, you can back out of the Virtual Machine settings. Adding software level TPM to Workstation Pro and Workstation Player Ensure you are updated to version 16.2.0 (Pro - Player ~600mb) Ensure VMware (manager) is not running Go to the directory where the VM is stored (for example D:\VM\Windows 11 Dev) Open the file with the .vmx extension with Notepad Add the line managedvm.autoAddVTPM = "software" Save the file by closing it Double click on it to open it in VMware Workstation Pro or Player Start your VM You can confirm that TPM is present by running the command tpm.msc by right clicking on the Start icon and entering it in the Run command. As you can see above, I am running the latest Windows 11 Dev build 22478 with a compatible TPM present in the free VMware Workstation Player. In addition you will also find that a TPM module is once again present in the virtual machine settings, do not delete it! Michael Roy, who works on the VMware Fusion and Workstation teams, shared the undocumented feature via Twitter and also noted that people will see a significant performance gain, and best of all, you will be free of having to enter a password each time. Windows 11 compliant TPM support added to the free version of VMware Workstation 16.2.0
  21. In a recent U-turn, Microsoft recently extended their TPM 2.0 support requirement to virtual machines, meaning most virtual machines no longer supported Windows 11, including the popular Parallels macOS application. Thankfully that company never rests, and they have just announced an update to their application, taking Parallels Desktop to version 17.1. Parallels now include improved Windows 11 virtual machine (VM) support and stability with the introduction of Virtual Trusted Platform Modules (vTPMs) by default for all future and past Windows 11 VMs. “Knowing that Parallels Desktop plays a critical role in enabling users to run the latest versions of Windows on their favorite Mac device today, we’ve developed a simple solution to help all users upgrade to Windows 11 with the enablement of vTPMs by default on all Mac devices,” said Elena Koryakina, Vice President of Engineering at Parallels. “The latest version of Parallels Desktop also builds on our customers’ top requests with new gaming and 3D integrations to further enhance the user experience.” The app now also fully supports macOS Monterey as a host OS and improves the user experience when running macOS Monterey in a VM on Apple M1 Mac. Users of all editions of Parallels Desktop 17 (Standard, Pro & Business) will be able to run Windows 11 with the use of a vTPM added by default to meet the minimum requirements of Windows 11. In response to customers’ top requests, Parallels also improves graphics for several Windows games including, but not limited to: World of Warcraft, Age of Empires 2 Definitive Edition, Tomb Raider 3, Metal Gear Solid V: The Phantom Pain, Mount & Blade II: Bannerlord, World of Tanks, Raft. Read more about the specific requirements needed when running Windows 11 on either Apple M1 or Intel-based Mac computers in their blog post here. Parallels 17.1 now has Windows 11, virtual TPM 2.0 support
  22. Microsoft today announced the release of Windows 11 Build 22000.282 to Beta and Release Preview Channel Insiders. This build includes the fix for AMD chipset performance issue and several minor bug fixes. You can find the full change log below. What’s new in Windows 11 Build 22000.282: We fixed an L3 caching issue that might affect performance in some applications on devices that have AMD Ryzen processors after upgrading to Windows 11 (original release). We fixed an issue for a small number of users that prevents the Start menu from working and prevents you from seeing the updated taskbar design after upgrading to Windows 11 (original release). We fixed a race condition that occurs during the early part of startup that might cause a stop error. We fixed a regression that might cause stop error 0x38 on some machine configurations that use non-ASCII text in the registry. We fixed an issue with the interrupt handling of certain processors that might cause devices to stop responding. We fixed an issue that causes PowerShell to create an infinite number of child directories. This issue occurs when you use the PowerShell Move-Item command to move a directory to one of its children. As a result, the volume fills up and the system stops responding. We fixed an issue that causes the Server Manager application to disappear after you use it to remove Hyper-V features. This issue occurs when you install Server Manager on Windows 11 (original release) clients using Remote Server Administration Tools (RSAT). We fixed a threading issue that might cause the Windows Remote Management (WinRM) service to stop working when it is under a high load. We fixed an issue that causes the Windows Management Instrumentation (WMI) provider host process to stop working. This occurs because of an unhandled access violation that occurs when using the Desired State Configuration (DSC). We fixed an issue that causes a device to stop responding when you forcibly shut down the device while a Group Policy is being updated. We fixed an issue that causes file migration between Distributed File System (DFS) paths that are stored on different volumes to fail. This issue occurs when you implement the migration using PowerShell scripts that use the Move-Item command. We fixed an issue that prevents you from writing to a WMI repository after a low memory condition occurs. We fixed an issue with a hardcoded font in the PowerShell shortcut file that distorts Japanese, Chinese, and Korean language fonts. This update fixed this issue for all newly created users on the machine. Existing users can use the C:\Users\Default\AppData\Roaming\Microsoft\Windows\Start Menu\Programs\Windows PowerShell\Windows PowerShell.lnk file to open PowerShell to address the issue. Alternatively, existing users can create a shortcut to this file on the desktop and use the shortcut to open PowerShell. We fixed an issue with parsing time formats in events when milliseconds are excluded. We fixed an issue that incorrectly renders some Enhanced Metafile Format (EMF) files. This issue occurs if you build the EMF files using third-party applications with ExtCreatePen() and ExtCreateFontIndirect(). We provided administrators the option to reset the zoom to the default for HTML dialogs in Microsoft Edge Internet Explorer mode. We fixed an issue with Enterprise Mode Site List redirection from Internet Explorer 11 to Microsoft Edge. In certain circumstances, the redirection opens a site in multiple tabs in Microsoft Edge. We fixed an issue that causes Internet Explorer to stop working when you input certain characters in the Input Method Editor (IME). We fixed an issue with PropertyGet in JScript9.dll. We fixed a memory leak that occurs when you use nested classes within VBScript. We fixed an issue that fails to keep the NumLock state after a Fast Startup restart. We fixed an issue with moving certain app windows. Moving these app windows might be unusually slow if a File Explorer window is visible on the screen. We fixed an issue that intermittently prevents the Mail app from accepting keyboard input in the address and subject boxes. We fixed an issue with the UI for renaming files using folder view in File Explorer. The UI fails to properly handle inline composition using the new Japanese IME. We fixed an issue in which the use of App-V intermittently causes black screens to appear when signing in on the credentials page. We fixed an issue with an internet print server that fails to properly package modified printer properties before sending the package to the client. We implemented a Group Policy setting for the following registry value (For more information, see KB5005010): Registry location: HKLM\Software\Policies\Microsoft\Windows NT\Printers\PointAndPrint Value name: RestrictDriverInstallationToAdministrators Value data: 1 We fixed an issue that might cause Xbox Game Bar recording features to be unavailable. We fixed an issue that might cause distortion in the audio captured by voice assistants. We fixed an issue that causes a memory leak in lsass.exe when the pTokenPrivileges buffer is not released. We fixed an issue that might cause Kerberos.dll to stop working within the Local Security Authority Subsystem Service (LSASS). This occurs when LSASS processes simultaneous Service for User (S4U) user-to-user (U2U) requests for the same client user. We fixed an issue with a non-paged pool (NPP) leak from the UxSF pool tag. This leak occurs when lsass.exe stops processing asynchronous Security Support Provider Interface (SSPI) calls. We fixed an issue that prevents you from enabling BitLocker on a thinly provisioned virtual machine (VM). The error is “A device attached to the system is not functioning” and the system logs, “STATUS_UNSUCCESSFUL”. We improved the performance of MsSense.exe in environments with User Datagram Protocol (UDP) applications that require high amounts of bandwidth. We fixed an issue in Windows Defender Exploit Protection that prevents some Microsoft Office applications from working on machines that have certain processors. We enabled credentials for Azure Active Directory (Azure AD) Active Directory Federation Services (ADFS) users in Quick Assist. We fixed an issue that sometimes prevents Quick Assist users from using full screen view after they start a remote assistance session. We fixed an issue in which Set-RDSessionCollectionConfiguration does not set the camerastoredirect:s:value custom property. We fixed an IME mode instability in the RemoteApp scenario. You must install this update on the Remote Desktop server and Remote Desktop client. We fixed an issue that causes the IME toolbar to appear even when the RemoteApp is closed. We fixed a paged pool memory leak of the registry keys for the Virtual Desktop ID that occurs in explorer.exe. We made small adjustments to the contrast theme colors, such as making hyperlinks more distinct when you hover over them while you are using the desert theme. We fixed an issue that prevents Narrator and other screen readers from announcing when the Start menu is open in certain cases. We fixed an issue that occurs if the search index is damaged in certain ways; attempts to search using the taskbar or File Explorer fail. We fixed an issue that prevents the search window from appearing on a secondary monitor. We fixed an issue that might cause the File Explorer window to lose focus when you map a network drive. We fixed an issue that sometimes causes the lock screen to appear black if you set up slideshow. We fixed a reliability issue with LogonUI.exe, which affects the rendering of the network status text on the credentials screen. We fixed an issue that prevents you from opening multiple instances of an app using Shift and clicking on the app’s icon in the taskbar. We updated the visual design and animations of the Chat icon on the taskbar. We removed the warning about losing other people’s unsaved work when shutting down or restarting if no other users are signed in. We fixed an issue that might occur when you configure the policy, “Delete user profiles older than a specified number of days on system restart”. If a user has been signed in for longer than the time specified in the policy, the device might unexpectedly delete profiles at startup. We fixed an issue that fails to establish a connection to the Remote Desktop Protocol (RDP) service or immediately drops an RDP connection under certain circumstances. We fixed an issue that might cause input delays for certain Bluetooth mice and keyboards. We fixed an issue that prevents the Start menu from opening after a video driver upgrade. We improved the precision of the estimates for downtime when the estimates are at least two minutes or more. We fixed a Local Security Authority Subsystem Service (LSASS) domain controller memory leak that is reported in Privileged Access Management (PAM) deployments. We fixed an issue that occurs when the Lightweight Directory Access Protocol (LDAP) bind cache is full, and the LDAP client library receives a referral. We fixed an issue in Adamsync.exe that affects the syncing of large Active Directory subtrees. We fixed an issue that causes a deadlock when Offline Files are enabled. As a result, CscEnpDereferenceEntryInternal holds parent and child locks. We added the ability to configure period or dot (.) delimited IP We fixed interchangeably with fully qualified host names in the following Group Policy settings: Package Point and Print – Approved Servers Point and Print Restrictions Source: Microsoft Microsoft releases Windows 11 Build 22000.282 to Beta and Release Preview Channel Insiders
  23. Update is reportedly being prepared for public release early next week. Now that Windows 11 is out, the arduous process of fixing the new operating system's bugs can begin. The OS got its first Patch Tuesday update earlier this week, and now another update is rolling out to Windows Insiders in the Beta and Release Preview channels. It fixes a long list of early problems with Windows 11. The headliner here is a fix for a problem affecting L3 cache latency on AMD Ryzen processors. According to AMD, the bug can reduce performance by 3–5 percent. The Windows 11 update released earlier this week may have actually made the problem worse, but at least a fix is imminent. The L3 latency bug is one of a pair of problems that AMD identified with Windows 11 earlier this month. The other Windows 11 problem AMD identified, which can prevent high-core-count, high-wattage Ryzen chips from correctly assigning work to the processor's fastest individual cores, will be fixed via an AMD driver update. The Release Preview Insider channel is usually a Windows update's last stop before public distribution. A post shared on Reddit suggests that the Windows update is being targeted for release on Tuesday, October 19th, while the AMD driver update for the other problem should be released two days later, on the 21st. Other bugs addressed in the Windows 11 update include one that prevented some upgraders from seeing the new Taskbar or using the Start menu, a PowerShell bug that can fill up a storage volume with "an infinite number of child directories" when you try to move a directory into its own child directory, and a number of problems that could cause freezes, crashes, and slowdowns. Fixes for AMD Ryzen performance, other Windows 11 issues rolling out to testers now
  24. Last month, the Windows Subsystem for Android (WSA) popped up on the Microsoft Store (image above) indicating that development work for bringing Android Apps to Windows 11 is going on even though the feature is yet to debut officially. Not just that, as earlier today, screenshots too of purported Android apps running on Windows 11 have also leaked allegedly via a Bilibili user named Makazeu, who seems to be a code porter for Microsoft itself. There are a couple of images of the said leak, the first one shows WeChat while the second image appears to be that of Bilibili app for Android. The earlier Microsoft store leak revealed some of the system requirements that WSA will have. A user will need the Windows 11 build 22000 or newer (it is actually written as Windows 10, but we believe this is an error), 64-bit x86 or ARM CPU, and 8GB memory. It will also be available on the newer Xbox consoles too. This means the release version (build 22000.194) of Windows 11 is supported. For bringing the Android apps, Microsoft has collaborated with Amazon and the apps will be delivered via the Amazon Appstore making use of Intel's Bridge technology. According to Intel, this technology is a "runtime post-compiler that enables applications to run natively on x86-based devices" including on Windows. Microsoft officials have only stated that it is coming "soon", however we can deduce that it is very likely we won't see it until the release of Windows 11 22H2, which could put it at around October 2022 for the general public. via Windows Latest Screenshots of Android apps running on Windows 11 have leaked
  25. Intel earlier today released its newest DCH graphics driver version 30.0.100.9955. The major highlight of the new driver is the addition of support for H264 and HEVC DX12 video encode on Windows 11. Aside from that, it brings several fixes for bugs in games and other applications. There is also a long list of known issues. The bugs fixed in this release are: Minor graphic anomalies seen in Cyberpunk 2077* (DX12), Hitman 2* (DX12), Wolfenstein: Youngblood* (Vulkan). Minor graphic anomalies seen in Monster Jam Steel Titans 2*, Ark Survival Evolved* (when Intel Sharpening Filter is enabled) on 11th Generation Intel® Core™ Processors with Intel® Iris® Xe graphics. Black screen seen in Rage 2* (Vulkan) (after ALT + TAB) on 11th Generation Intel® Core™ Processors with Intel® Iris® Xe graphics. Intermittent crash or hang seen in Ark: Survival Evolved* (during launch), Star Wars: Squadrons* (during launch), Warframe* (DX12) on Intel® Iris® Xe Discrete graphics. Minor graphic anomalies seen in Euro Truck Simulator 2*, Marvel’s Avengers* (DX12), Metro Exodus* (DX12) on Intel® Iris® Xe Discrete graphics. The unresolved issues that remain are: Intermittent crash or hang may be seen in Call of Duty: Black Ops Cold War* (DX12), Forza Horizon 4* (DX12) (after launch), The Sims 4* (hot plug or unplug of external display). Minor graphic anomalies may be observed in Dead by Daylight*, Death Stranding* (DX12), Forza Horizon 4*(DX12). Microsoft Flight Simulator* (during installation), Red Dead Redemption 2* (DX12), Red Dead Redemption*(Vulkan) (while pressing ESC), Resident Evil Village* (DX12) (while pressing ESC), Shadow of the Tomb Raider* (DX12), The Surge 2* (Vulkan), Tom Clancy’s Ghost Recon Breakpoint*. 11th Generation Intel® Core™ Processors with Intel® Iris® Xe graphics: Crash or hang may be seen in Breathedge*, Deathloop* (DX12), Detroit: Become Human* (Vulkan), FIFA 21*, Moonlight Blade* (DX12), NBA 2K21* (DX12) (when switching resolution from 1920 x 1080 to 1600 x 900 and 1280 x 720), Necromunda:Hired gun* (DX12) (Shadow option other than low), Red Dead Redemption* (Vulkan), The Dark Pictures: Man of Medan* (online mode), Vendetta Online* (Vulkan). 11th Generation Intel® Core™ Processors with Intel® Iris® Xe graphics: Black screen may be seen in Arma 3* (when changing display mode to windowed or full screen). 11th Generation Intel® Core™ Processors with Intel® Iris® Xe graphics: Minor graphic anomalies may be seen in Adobe Premiere Pro 2020 during video playback, Call of the Sea*, Crysis Remastered*, Dark Souls 3*, Elex*, Gears of War Ultimate Edition* (DX12), Gears 5* (DX12), Just Cause 4 *, Mount & Blade II: Bannerlord*. Intel® Iris® Xe Discrete graphics: Intermittent crash or hang may be seen in Conan Exiles* (Low End Laptop Mode” in game settings), Doom Eternal* (Vulkan), Forza Motorsport 6* (DX12), Spyro: Reignited Trilogy*. Intel® Iris® Xe Discrete graphics: Crash or hang may be seen when launching Batman: Arkham City*, Outriders* (DX12). Intel® Iris® Xe Discrete graphics: Minor graphic anomalies may be observed in Assassin’s Creed Valhalla* (DX12), Code Vein*, GRID 2019* (DX12), Rocket League* (when CMAA Enabled). 11th Generation Intel® Core™ Processors with Intel® Iris® Xe graphics: Display is getting blanked out with [email protected] resolution connected via dock. 11th Generation Intel® Core™ Processors with Intel® Iris® Xe graphics: Thunderbolt display may not turn on after HDR is enabled for built-in display. The new 30.0.100.9955 driver is compatible with all Intel graphics products starting from the 6th gen processors (Skylake) and newer, as well as Xe-based products. To download it, head over to Intel's official site where you can find the relevant links. There is a separate driver for Kaby Lake G though as it is built with Radeon Vega M inside. You can find details about that driver here. https://www.neowin.net/news/intels-latest-3001009955-driver-brings-additional-video-encode-support-on-windows-11/
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