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  1. The redesigned Start menu is arguably one of the most divisive features in Windows 11. However, Microsoft believes that it is a great piece of engineering and provides an amazing user experience, something that it regularly advertises to consumers. However, it is interesting to know that a former Microsoft executive who is quite authoritative in this domain isn't a fan of Windows 11's Start menu either. As spotted by WinFuture.de, Microsoft's ex-Director of User Experiences Jensen Harris - who spent five years in this role out of the over 16 years he spent at the company in total, leaving in 2014 - has slammed the UX of Windows 11's Start menu on Twitter, saying that he is "shocked" by the design: The Twitter thread is quite long and if you want, you can view it in full by clicking the embedded tweet above. However, we will explain some of his grievances directly in this article. Harris claims that the banner advertisement for the Bing Wallpaper app looks like a virus, has a dated background color choice, and the text is misaligned too. Additionally, the left side of the banner has a rounded corner while the right has straight edges. The former executive went on to say that: The bigger issue here though: why are there banner ads in the Start menu? Is the amount of $ made by this wallpaper app worth cheapening the experience people have in this very high-touch piece of UI? It erodes trust—I wasn't even searching for "wallpaper." Which brings me to: Great UI should help people achieve a task with minimum friction. But the next section down (referring to the "Switch to the browser recommended by Microsoft" section) is expressly designed to introduce friction into my experience. It's the largest UI in the Start menu, and it's designed specifically to distract me away from achieving my intended task. Moreover, the "Open results in browser" hovering button at the bottom is covering two buttons below it. There are other inconsistencies that Harris has highlighted too: Harris then dived into the history of the Start menu and how the previous iterations were built with so much thought and effort put into the intricacies of the design: Design matters. Details matter. Especially in UI as iconic as the Windows Start menu. I remember the team creating a special ligature in the Segoe UI font (used in Windows) to make "S" and "t" align beautifully for the word "Start". That's how important Start was to Microsoft. Microsoft has many brilliant designers who care deeply about the work they do—I worked with many who are still there! It just comes down to a question of what you prioritize. User experience needs to be architected with as much intensity as you architect your tech investments. Finally, Harris has concluded his thread by saying that he's not a fan of the Start menu being moved to the center too as it also goes against the recommendations of Fitt's Law. That said, our readers should know that you can left-align the Taskbar/Start menu, if you want. Overall, it's clear that Harris isn't a fan of the revamped Start menu and he is making his feelings known to the public. Obviously, he doesn't hold a position at Microsoft anymore so he can't directly influence the design process at the company, but it's interesting to see that a person who is more of an authority on Windows 11's design than regular consumers isn't a fan of the new UX either. Do you agree with Harris or do you think that the Windows 11's Start menu isn't as bad as he claims it is? Let us know in the comments section below! Via: WinFuture.de Microsoft's ex-User Experience chief is "shocked" by poor design of Windows 11's Start menu
  2. Microsoft reduced the functionality of several core operating system areas when it launched the Windows 11 operating system. One of these was the redesigned Start Menu, which I called barely usable in 2021. Microsoft removed quite a bit of functionality from the Windows 11 Start Menu. Folders, groups, the ability to display all apps and pinned items at the same time, live tiles, and options to resize the Start Menu were all removed in Windows 11. The Windows 11 start menu separated pinned programs and recommended; Windows 11 users who preferred to disable the recommended items were left with a blank area that was of no use whatsoever. Room for pinned locations was limited, which made the removal of folder and grouping options precarious, as these could have improved the lack of room somewhat. In a hurry? Here are the main changes: Folders return. Drag and drop a pinned item on another to create a folder. An animation provides hints in this regard. You may rename folders, rearrange apps inside folders and remove pinned apps from folders. Start Menu layouts are available. More Pins expands the Pinned section, while More Recommendations expands the recommendation section of the Start Menu. The Start Menu in Windows 11 version 22H2 One of the goals of Windows 11 version 22H2 seems to be redemption, or at least, to bring back some of the features that were dropped in the initial release of Windows 11. Whether Microsoft had the intention to bring back these features all along, or decided to restore them based on user feedback is unknown. Windows 11 users who open the Start Menu of Windows 11 version 22H2 for the first time won't notice many differences right away. It looks and feels like the original Windows 11 Start Menu on first glance. Some may even miss the functionality that Microsoft restored, unless Microsoft plans to provide guidance on those. One of the main points of criticism leveled at the original Windows 11 Start Menu was that Microsoft removed the ability to group pinned items. The improved Start Menu supports the creation of folders. All it takes is to drag one pinned item over another to create a new folder or to add it to an existing folder. Dropping pinned items on a folder may be difficult at first, as Windows may mistake the attempt for one that moves a pinned items to a new position in the Start Menu. A click or tap on a folder opens all included items in an overlay on the screen. From there, it takes another click or tap to execute one of the included programs. A click or tap outside the overlay area hides it again so that the full Start Menu becomes visible again. The default name of a newly created folder is always folder, even when users create multiple folders. The name of a folder can be changed with a click on the "edit name" field when it is expanded. Once done, the new name is displayed in the the Windows 11 Start Menu. Folders have a few limitations. You can't drop a folder onto another to create subfolders or merge the two. There is also a limit of four pinned icons that each folder displays in the Start Menu, even if more pinned icons are stored inside. The icons of the first four pinned items are displayed as the folder icon in the Start Menu. You may reorder them to display different icons. Another limitation is the inability to delete folders right away. You need to move each pinned item out of the folder first; the folder itself disappears into thin air once the last pinned item is removed from it. Start Menu Layouts Another criticism leveled at Microsoft was that the Windows 11 Start Menu had a fixed layout that could not be changed. Users who disabled the recommended section could not use the lower half of the Start Menu because of that. Microsoft introduces Start Menu layouts in version 22H2. Three different layouts are supported: one of them is the default half-and-half layout, the other two give pinned items or recommendations more room in the Start Menu. The "more pins" layout gives pinned items most of the available room. Recommended is reduced to a small section at the bottom. Users who would have preferred an option to remove the recommended section entirely will be disappointed, as no such option exists in Windows 11 version 22H2. Still, the new "more pins" layout unlocks more room for pinned items on the Start Menu, which means less scrolling for some users. The "more recommendations" layout prioritizes recommendations over pinned items. It expands the recommended section of the Start Menu and limits the pinned section to two rows. Options to show recently used apps and opened items need to be enabled in the Windows 11 preferences. It may take some time before recommendations are displayed in the Start Menu. The pinned and recommended group titles in the Start Menu have a context menu now. Right-click on pinned to get a direct link to the Start Menu settings in the preferences app. A right-click on recommended displays the same link and an option to refresh the listing manually. Windows 11 refreshes recommended content automatically in intervals. Closing Words Microsoft restores some functionality to the Start Menu in Windows 11 version 22H2, which it removed in the original Windows 11 release. Folders give users more options when it comes to arranging and managing pinned items. The Start Menu layouts address another point of criticism, but some users, especially those who disable recommendations, may argue that the changes do not go far enough. Microsoft could have added a switch to remove Recommendations entirely from the Start Menu to expand the pinned section even further. Other missing features, including the ability to resize the Windows 11 Start Menu or create groups won't make a return in Windows 11 version 22H2. While there is still a chance that Microsoft may introduce them again in a future update, it is certain that Live Tiles won't make a comeback in Windows 11. Now You: what is your take on these changes? Windows 11 version 22H2: Start Menu changes
  3. Sod it, I'll just go back to Windows 10 Earlier today, Microsoft sent an email to all Windows Insiders with the subject line "How we built Start" under the heading "Learn what's coming next". You'd be forgiven for thinking it was new information on some changes happening to Start ahead of Windows 11 version 22H2 release, but no, it linked to a short video originally posted on June 2021, that's before most people in the world had even experienced Windows 11 for themselves. In the video, we see several Microsoft employees talking about how they decided the new Start would work in Windows 11, while Ashley, one of the User Researchers says: "It's really easy to design something that you [meaning herself] like, but that doesn't necessarily mean that it will work well for everyone". It would seem to me, being a User Researcher, your job should be to design for the majority. Well, you can view the video for yourself below. In the video we see several mockups for the Start menu that include a Calendar and Weather placement, but as the video draws to a conclusion, Ryan, a "Design Lead", says that "we always saw Search, Files and Applications together" to which Eric, the Program Manager for Start, agreed with. This was supposedly a decision made by a limited user focus group, or as Microsoft's likes to claim, "based on their telemetry readings of usage". In any case, yes, those are three things used a lot by Windows users, you know, to launch apps in the operating system. But why dismiss years of incremental improvements made to the desktop experience to come to the conclusion that "most people" used Start to launch apps or search for apps and files? It's nothing less than tunnel vision; where's the "How can we make it better" attitude? What could have been. It also goes against many things posted in the Feedback Hub about the crippled Start and how useless it has become. This will at least be improved somewhat in version 22H2 where it will be possible to create Groups for pinned apps, something that received over 7,000 upvotes on the Feedback Hub while ignoring other Feedback. In fact, the video, showing off features that would have made the Start menu so much better than what we ended up with, just feels like a tease. One has to wonder why Microsoft decided to toot its own horn over a year old video on the design of the Start menu when there was so much pushback over it. It just goes to show that the company is tone-deaf when it comes to listening to some of its most ardent users. And it's not like we're just learning about this problem, Microsoft has shown contempt for Windows Insiders before, dismissing the idea that the Taskbar should be able to be moved, or that their design team prefers to focus on desktop stickers rather than of fix the many UI inconsistencies in Windows. The video has gained some ... choice comments on YouTube since the email dropped around nine hours ago, I included a couple of the main pain points for most people above. But, for now I guess we'll have to stick with Start menu replacements like Start11 or others, at least in 3rd party offerings you can position the taskbar to the top or bottom and add back useful items to the Start menu. Tone-deaf: Microsoft reminds people of the great job it did of building Start in Windows 11
  4. You can get it back in the left corner, but you still won’t have your old familiar menu back When you upgrade from Windows 10 to Windows 11, one of the first things you may do is wonder: where the heck is my Start menu? Traditionally, the Windows Start menu has been in the lower left corner of the screen, but when your new version of Windows appears, you’ll find the Start icon among a group of icons in the center of your taskbar at the bottom of the screen. The Windows 11 Start menu is now a small icon in the center of the taskbar. Click on the Start menu icon, and things will look very different as well. Instead of the large square Live Tiles that used to pop up, you have a much more modest set of app icons, mostly showing Microsoft-related apps, pinned to the main page. Click on “All apps” on the top right corner (just below the search field), and you get the familiar A-to-Z listing of apps. But no tiles. Look below the app icons, and you’ll find a “Recommended” section, which offers apps that Microsoft thinks you should try (such as Teams), and if you click on the “More” button, some of the files or apps you may have used recently. Clicking on the search field offers immediate access to several popular apps. By the way, that search field? Click in that, and the Start menu will open up, giving you immediate access to File Explorer, settings, and other apps. While some may appreciate this more puritanical version of the Start menu, others who have gotten used to the more configurable version in Windows 10 may want to know how they can go back to the more familiar, and more personal, version. You can move the Start icon to the left using the taskbar alignment option in your setup menu. You can get some of the way there by moving the centered apps to the left of the taskbar: Right-click on the taskbar and click on “Taskbar settings” Select “Taskbar behaviors” Look for “Taskbar alignment” and click on the button on the right where it says “Center.” Select “Left” instead. Close the settings window, and you’ll see that the app icons in the taskbar have moved to the left, with the Start menu icon in the corner. Now the Start menu icon is in the left corner, but the menu itself is unchanged. While this will place the Start menu back where you expected it, it will not restore the one you were used to. To get that back, you’re going to have to go to a third-party app. There is at least one available. Stardock, a company whose Start10 app allows Windows 10 users to keep their beloved Windows 7 menu UI, has a Start11 app, which it says will bring back the classic Windows 10 Start menu. The app has a starting price of $5.99 for one active install. So far, Start11 is the only app we’ve found that purports to restore the Windows 10 menu system. (There were some regedit hacks floating around out there, but most were either very elaborate or were made useless somewhere along Microsoft’s beta cycle.) If a better solution presents itself, we’ll be sure to let you know. Update April 15th, 2022, 1:10PM ET: This article was originally published on September 21st, 2021; information about the Start11 app has been updated. How to put the Windows 11 Start menu back where it belongs
  5. Microsoft gives us another look at the new Windows 10 Start Menu Microsoft has been teasing us with an updated Start Menu for some months now, with rumours that the emphasis will move away from Live Tiles to basic icons. Microsoft has in part both confirmed and debunked the rumour, for example on the Windows Insider Webcast saying the Live Tiles will remain available to developers and users, but confirming that Microsoft itself is moving away from them, and releasing a set of icons for Windows 10 apps which do not include Live Tiles at all, a big change from previously. The design team also showed off a design concept where the move back to icons is used to improve the look of the Windows 10 Start Menu, and today the Office 365 team posted a set to Windows 10 wallpapers which appear to show the same new-style Start Menu in action. The screenshot shows that the “tile” area is now used to integrate better with your choice of Dark or Light mode, with Microsoft noting that your Start Menu would no longer be dominated by blocks of colour you can not change. Microsoft says this is the experience users will receive when they switch Live Tiles off. We can also see on the App list the items are also no longer surrounded by blocks of colour. The intention is to bring Windows 10 closer to Windows 10X and to make a UI that works as well with the Dark as Light mode. Microsoft gives us another look at the new Windows 10 Start Menu
  6. Panos Panay tease new File Explorer, Start Menu for Windows 10 We have seen earlier that Microsoft’s designers are working on a new Start Menu for Windows 10 (not Windows 10X) and now Panos Panay has posted a video celebrating 1 billion Windows 10 installations which appears to confirm that the changes and more are on the way. The video shows a new and stylish File Explorer with a simplified UI. It is notable for example for not having any address bar or menu bar, and the deep OneDrive integration is also clear. More surprisingly is that it also appears to support Google Drive. The video also teases other improvements. It also appears to show changes to the right-click menu, with the addition of a Go Back button. The video also shows a new Start Menu. That is notable for having much fewer live tiles, but it is otherwise not too dissimilar to what we have now. It is not clear when these improvements will be coming to Windows 10, but given that they have not yet been seeded to Insiders it seems unlikely to be in 2020. via WindowsLatest. Source: Panos Panay tease new File Explorer, Start Menu for Windows 10 (MSPoweruser)
  7. Microsoft’s designers show us a Windows 10 Start Menu with rounded corners We have heard recently that Microsoft abandoned plans to square off the tabs and menus in the new Edge, saying: … the latest Fluent designs are characterized by rounded corners across objects and controls… Of course, most of Windows 10 has exactly the opposite design – sharp, square corners. It seems, however, this look may be on the way out, going by a mock-up of the Windows 10 Start Menu posted by Microsoft’s Tips site. As can be seen above, the Search box is distinctly rounded, as is the context menu and tiles. It is unclear if we are looking at a screenshot or a mock-up made from scratch, but given Microsoft’s recent comments on Edge’s Fluent Design, it seems likely the days of Windows 10 being square are pretty numbered. via WindowsLatest Microsoft’s designers show us a Windows 10 Start Menu with rounded corners
  8. Microsoft finally shows off the new Windows 10 Start menu This is what it’ll look like (Image credit: Microsoft) There have been plenty of rumors and leaks recently about Microsoft overhauling the iconic Start menu of Windows 10, and now the company has officially shown off what it’s been working on. During the Windows Insider podcast, Microsoft announced the changes it was making to the Start menu, which has been designed to “visually differentiate the Start menu from something that’s chaotic color to something that’s more uniform.” Essentially, it seems like Microsoft has deemed the current Windows 10 Start menu to be too busy, so it’s going for a more understated look that’s more simple to use, and will make finding apps easier. One of the biggest changes to the Windows 10 Start menu will be to Live Tiles. These have been included with Windows 10 since the start, and are animated app icons that provide extra information depending on the app they represent. While useful on mobile device with limited screen space (such as smartphones, as Live Tiles originated in the doomed Windows Phone operating system), they made the Start menu of Windows 10 look cluttered and confusing. Not that many apps use Live Tiles any more, which led to rumors that Microsoft was preparing to ditch them altogether. From what Microsoft has now shown of the new Windows 10 Start menu, it seems that Live Tiles will be replaced with static icons that use Microsoft’s new Fluent Design style. However, Microsoft was keen to point out that Live Tiles are not getting killed off (yet), and that “those that enjoy their Live Tiles will continue to be able to do so.” Familiar looking While Microsoft appears to be keeping Live Tiles for now, albeit in a very pared-back form, their days may still be numbered. According to The Verge, Microsoft hasn’t made its mind up on what to do with Live Tiles just yet, and will be keeping an eye on feedback from people using Windows 10X, the dual-screen version of Windows 10, which has a Start menu that doesn’t feature Live Tiles. Other than that, it seems the upcoming Start menu will look quite similar to the existing one, but anything Microsoft does to make the Start menu less cluttered and easier to use is a good move in our view. We’re not sure when the new Start menu will appear in Windows 10, but it’s probably too late for it to be included in the upcoming Windows 10 20H1 (also known as Windows 10 2004) update. Source: Microsoft finally shows off the new Windows 10 Start menu (TechRadar)
  9. vissha

    StartAllBack 2.9.95 RC

    Introducing StartAllBack: Windows 11 from better timeline, Embrace, enhance, unsweep classic UI from under the rug. Restore and improve taskbar • Show labels on task icons • Adjust icon size and margins • Move taskbar to top, left or right edges • Drag and drop stuff onto taskbar • Center task icons but keep Start button on the left • Split into segments, use dynamic translucency • Separate corner icons with Windows 7/10 UI Restore and improve File Explorer UI • Ribbon and Command Bar revamped with translucent effects • Details pane on bottom • Old search box (the one which works) • Dark mode support for more dialogs Restore and improve context menus • All new look with rounded acrylic menus • Fast and responsive taskbar menus • New fonts, better touch support Restore and improve start menu • Launch apps and go to system places in one click • Navigate dropdown menus like a boss • Enjoy fast and reliable search Finally, lightweight styling and UI consistency • Enjoy Windows 7, Windows 10 and third-party taskbar and start menu styles • Fix UI inconsistencies in Win32 apps • Don't be blue: recolor UI in all windows apps • Negative resource usage: fewer RAM used, fewer processes started OS: Windows 11 Home: https://www.startallback.com/ Downloads: Installer: https://s3.amazonaws.com/startisback/StartAllBack_2.9.95_setup.exe Installer + Fix: Site: https://www.mirrored.to Sharecode [?]: /files/151QAQ1O/StartAllBack.2.9.95.RC_-_Installer___Fix.rar_links
  10. Introducing StartAllBack: Windows 11 from better timeline, Embrace, enhance, unsweep classic UI from under the rug. Restore and improve taskbar • Show labels on task icons • Adjust icon size and margins • Move taskbar to top, left or right edges • Drag and drop stuff onto taskbar • Center task icons but keep Start button on the left • Split into segments, use dynamic translucency • Separate corner icons with Windows 7/10 UI Restore and improve File Explorer UI • Ribbon and Command Bar revamped with translucent effects • Details pane on bottom • Old search box (the one which works) • Dark mode support for more dialogs Restore and improve context menus • All new look with rounded acrylic menus • Fast and responsive taskbar menus • New fonts, better touch support Restore and improve start menu • Launch apps and go to system places in one click • Navigate dropdown menus like a boss • Enjoy fast and reliable search Finally, lightweight styling and UI consistency • Enjoy Windows 7, Windows 10 and third-party taskbar and start menu styles • Fix UI inconsistencies in Win32 apps • Don't be blue: recolor UI in all windows apps • Negative resource usage: fewer RAM used, fewer processes started Changelog: Version 3.1.2 24 November 2021 Minor fixes and tweaks Version 3.1 22 November 2021 Center start menu with classic taskbar Central segment only (Dock-like) taskbar perk IME mode context menu works with classic taskbar Support for Dev build ~22500 Home: https://www.startallback.com/ Downloads: Installer: https://s3.amazonaws.com/startisback/StartAllBack_3.1.2_setup.exe Fix v1 Only - Pandemicikcus (RBC): Site: https://www.mirrored.to Sharecode [?]: /files/7TXHFJJN/StartAllBack_3.1.2.4172_-_Fix_Only.rar_links Fix v2 Only - Pandemicikcus (RBC): Readme: Site: https://www.mirrored.to Sharecode [?]: /files/YCJMCB8X/StartAllBack_3.1.2.4172_-_Fix_v2_Only.zip_links Installer + Fix v1: Site: https://www.mirrored.to Sharecode [?]: /files/ZEAKKZNH/StartAllBack_3.1.2.4172_-_Installer___Fix.rar_links Installer[New Signed Time] + Fix v2: Readme: Site: https://www.upload.ee Sharecode [?]: /files/13659860/StartAllBack_3.1.2.4172.zip.html or Site: https://www.mirrored.to Sharecode [?]: /files/IH939SAE/StartAllBack_3.1.2.4172_-_Installer[New_Signed_Time]___Fix_v2.zip_links StartAllBack (StartIsBack++) 3.1.2 - Repack KpoJIuK-Krolik: Site: https://www.mirrored.to Sharecode [?]: /files/1JJE8QO7/StartAllBack_(StartIsBack__)_3.1.2_-_Repack_KpoJIuK-Krolik_REPACK.ME.rar_links
  11. Windows 11 is scheduled to release around the end of this year, with many hints pointing towards an October time frame. However, for those eager to get their hands on the operating system ahead of its general rollout, Microsoft has released several builds in its Windows Insider channels. Although the OS is still under active development, we have started taking a closer look at some of its features and capabilities, and how they compare to those present in Windows 10. In the past week or so, we have talked about Windows Search and Widgets in Windows 11 in detail, and today, we'll be taking a look at a rather iconic component, namely the Start menu. As usual, it is important to note that since these are pre-release builds, the features that we talk about haven't been finalized yet, and may change leading to the general launch in a few weeks. That said, it is still worth it to dive into the aesthetics and the user experience, and speculate about how Microsoft can further enhance it. For the purpose of this hands-on, we'll be taking a look at Windows 11 build 22000.160 released just a few days ago versus a publicly available and up-to-date Windows 10 (version 21H1 build 19043.1165). Start menu in Windows 10 Before we take a look at the Windows 11 Start menu, it is important to refresh your memory a bit about the one present in Windows 10, especially if you don't use it much. It can be launched using the Windows logo on the taskbar or by pressing the Windows key on your keyboard. It shows all your apps on the left pane while Live Tiles of pinned apps are shown on the right. Depending upon developer support, these tiles refresh to show you updated information. The tiles can be categorized into groups (see "Productivity and "Explore" groups), and can also be further combined into folders (see "Play" folder), in which similar apps can be stored in a single tile. The sidebar on the left contains buttons for your PC account, Documents, Pictures, Settings, and Power. It's fairly simple to use and understand in most use-cases. Start menu in Windows 11 You'll immediately notice two major changes in the Start menu present in Windows 11. First, the Start menu is now closer to the center of the screen rather than left-aligned, because this is the default experience that Microsoft has been pushing with Windows 11. However, you can quickly rectify this and have it left-aligned if you are so inclined by heading over to Settings > Personalization > Taskbar. The second, and arguably more, significant change you'll notice is that the company has done away with Live Tiles completely. These have now been replaced with a scrollable list of pinned apps, as can be seen in the screenshot above. The apps cannot be grouped at all, but you can unpin them, move them to the top, or change their location. While the company hasn't made it clear yet about why Live Tiles were removed, it was likely because of low usage and dwindling developer support. Given that Microsoft has been actively pushing the Live Tiles UI since the Windows 8 and Windows phone days, this is a significant shift in strategy from the company. While I barely use the Start menu, let alone Live Tiles, this change does not impact me, but fans of Live Tiles will likely be miffed. You'll also notice that the Start menu hovers slightly over the taskbar rather than being adjacent to it, which is a common design trend we have noticed in other Closer Look pieces too. Start menu settings in Windows 11 If you're an avid user of the Start menu in Windows 10, you'll probably wonder where the sidebar options went in Windows 11. You'll notice that only the PC account and Power buttons are shown in the bottom pane by default. However, if you head over to Settings > Personalization > Start (screenshot above), you'll notice that Microsoft has made the Start menu quite configurable in Windows 11. Depending upon your preferences, you can choose to hide the recently added and most used apps in the top half of the Start menu as well as the files being shown in the "Recommended" section in the bottom half. Similarly, you can now pin more buttons next to the Power button, including Settings, File Explorer, Document, Downloads, Music, Pictures, Videos, Network, and Personal folder. This makes the Start menu considerably more powerful for its power users. All apps section in Windows 11 Start menu Provided that you're showing apps and File Explorer items on the Start menu, you can click on "All apps" (screenshot above) or "More" respectively to view the full list of apps and recommended files. At this point, you'll also notice the search bar present in the various sections of the Windows 11 Start menu. This was not present in Windows 10. However, as we noted in our in-depth look at Windows Search, this is currently not dependent on Windows search. If you click on any of the search bar in the Start menu, it will default to Windows Search with a jittery animation. I'm pretty sure this is not the intended behavior and come the general release of Windows 11, we'll likely see independent search bars where, for example, the search bar at the top of "All apps" in the screenshot above will only filter through the apps rather than the entire OS. Overall, I quite like the simplified look of the Start menu and the greater degree of control that users will have over it. I have never given a second glance at Live Tiles so their absence does not bother me at all either. I'll probably never used the pinned apps too since the only time I use the Start menu is when I press the Windows key to use the Windows Search. That said, for Start menu power users, there are significant changes in store here. Provided that Microsoft fixes the Search integration, this will be a fairly new experience, especially for those accustomed to Live Tiles. Closer Look: Start menu in Windows 11
  12. Microsoft's upcoming Windows 11 operating system has a Start Menu that is barely usable in its current form. Windows 11 will be the third operating system in succession with a Start Menu redesign. Windows 8 introduced the fullscreen Start interface and Windows 10 live tiles among other features such as different tile sizes for shortcuts. Windows 11's start menu comes with just a single new feature: a short list of recently opened files and installed apps. In fact, one of the main characteristics of the start menu is the removal of features. The Live Tiles of Windows 10 are gone, but that is just one of the many features that Microsoft removed. The default Windows 11 Start Menu displays a search at the top, 18 pinned tiles above the fold, more when you scroll, and recommendations below that. A link to "all apps" is available to display all Start entries in alphabetical order. You find options to lock the system, switch to another account, sign-out, or change the power state of the PC at the bottom. Folders, that can hold multiple icons, are gone. Groups, which you could use to organize Start Menu shortcuts, are gone. The option to display the all apps listing and the pinned items on the Start Menu at the same time is gone as well. Different tile sizes are not supported anymore either, and you cannot expand the Start Menu's size anymore. What you can do, is use drag & drop to move pinned icons in the Start Menu around, or use right-click operations to remove pinned items. Applications can still be added to the interface by right-clicking on them in Explorer or elsewhere and selecting the pin to start option. The Pinned and Recommended areas of the Start Menu have fixed sizes. While you may hide all recommendations or reduce the number of pinned items below 13 or 7 to free up rows, doing so does not make room for other content in the Start Menu. You are left with empty space that has no function whatsoever. Ultimately, what you get right now is a launcher with 18 shortcuts, the option to scroll to display more, an option to display the all apps listing, and a short listing of recently used programs/files and new applications, which you may expand as well. Since the Windows 11 Start Menu is so limited, one has to wonder why it should be used at all. You could put the shortcuts on the desktop or taskbar, and launch them from there without ever opening the Start interface. You could also rely on search for that, even though Windows Search is far from the best option when it comes to search on Windows. As far as the recently used or installed listings are concerned, these may work in work environments, but since the listings default to just three items each, they may not be that useful in home environments. As soon as you open more than three files during a session, you won't see all files opened during that session under recent anymore. Since all file types may be listed there, it is just the matter of opening three photos, video files, text files or any other file type to push out items from the recommended section. Windows 11 does display a "more" button in that case, which you may activate to display a larger listing of opened files sorted chronologically. Lack of customization options The Windows 11 Start Menu lacks customization options. While that may reduce issues that users may experience when using Start and is thus beneficial for Microsoft, it at the same time reduces the usefulness of the Start Menu. Even basic options, such as the removal of the Recommended section if you turn it off, is not supported. There is a slim chance that Microsoft is going to change that before the final reason, but if past decisions are anything to go by, it is more likely that the Start Menu of the preview builds will be the menu that users get when the operating system is released to the public. Closing Words Windows users who rely on the Start Menu may replace it using third-party apps such as Start11 or Open Shell, among others that will be released in the future. These bring back classic start menus to Windows 11, which you can customize to your liking. The Windows 11 Start Menu is barely usable
  13. The default Start menu in Build 22000.132 The changes implemented with the Windows 11 Start menu have been quite a hot topic since the first builds became available for Windows Insiders. The fact that it has been dumbed down quite a bit into a glorified 'Recents' jumplist has people already looking for alternatives and solutions. Just over a week ago, Stardock launched Start11 to bring back the Start menus of previous Windows versions, however the Windows 10 style with its Live Tiles was notably absent from the Beta. A Neowin reader, Dot Matrix, decided to share his own vision of what the Start menu could look like in Windows 11, and even went so far as to submit it as a suggestion on the Feedback Hub. As you can see above, the Start Menu returns to a Windows 10 layout with 'All apps' on the left and groups of pinned apps on the right. Instead of Live Tiles, we see the icons of the apps. Dot Matrix goes on to say "there's no more "recommended" section. That can go to hell." I can see where he's coming from. It's cool and all, but it is not very privacy orientated. In many ways, it's worse than Jumplist suggestions, which can be turned off in previous Windows versions. It can also be turned off in Windows 11 but it is a global setting, so if you disable it, you will get a half-empty Start menu and no Jumplist or File Explorer recommendations. (Why not split off those options, Microsoft?). Here we can see a full screen version of the Start menu which could be invoked through a tablet mode. All in all, it is already more useful than what is currently shipping with Windows 11, even if all the whitespace gives me a bit of a headache. And finally, as is shown above, what about moving the entire Widget pane and the spiritual successor to Live Tiles back into the Start menu instead of a flyout pane? Widgets pane in Windows 11 Personally, I think the widgets pane in Windows 11 is not well thought-out. Microsoft is saying that to get 'at a glance info' for weather and news, open the pane from the taskbar, completely missing out on an opportunity to pin these widgets on the desktop itself. As our screens get larger and wider (I have a 5180x1440 Ultrawide screen), it makes sense to be able to place widgets directly on the desktop. A news alert? Unless you purposely decide to check the widgets pane, you aren't going to see it, you have far more chance of seeing it if it is pinned on the desktop. Microsoft took a great idea with Live Tiles and implemented it poorly in Windows 10, insofar that they are now discontinued altogether. Anyway, I am rambling. If you like these Start menu concepts and think Microsoft should expand on it, all you can do is upvote it on the Feedback Hub right here. You can also give some feedback on these concepts in the comments below or directly in the forum thread. Concept: Here is a better Windows 11 Start menu, based off the Windows 10 one
  14. Microsoft's upcoming Windows 11 operating system changes the Start menu drastically in some areas, but keeps other features as they have been in previous versions of Windows. If you take a look at the Windows 11 Start Menu, you see a list of apps and links displayed at the top. Some of these are pinned, others are added automatically by Windows 11. Below that is the Recommended section. It displays recently added apps and recently opened files, but may also be used by Microsoft to display recommendations to the user. In fact, on a brand new Windows 11 system, you may see the "Get Started" recommendation in the section. Some Windows users may find these recommendations useful, others don't. Just like on Windows 10, it is possible to disable the Recommended section on Windows 11 to hide the section in the Start Menu. Microsoft kept the options in the Settings application under Personalization. On Windows 10, you find the options under Settings > Personalization > Start. There you may disable the following content: Show recently added apps. Show the most used apps. Show suggestions occasionally in Start. Show recently opened items in Jump Lists on Start or the taskbar and in the File Explorer Quick Access. Disable Recommended items in the Start Menu Select Start > Settings > Personalization. Look for Show recently added apps and turn it off. Look for Show most used apps and set it to off. Look for Show recently opened items in Start Jump List and File Explorer and turn it off. Changes take effect immediately. Just open Start, while Settings remains open, to test the change. Note that Recommended is still displayed, but you should not see any content anymore under the section once you have made the change. Unfortunately, there is no option to hide the section entirely to use it for something else. You may disable some of the options only, e.g. if you are interested in getting a list of recently installed applications, then you may keep that option enabled while disabling the other options. Just toggle the preferences again if you want to restore one or all of the listings in the Start Menu. Closing Words The Windows 11 start menu lacks customization options, even more so than the Windows 10 Start Menu. Some users may use the recommended section actively, others, who may not use it at all, are stuck with it nevertheless. While it is possible to hide the items of the section, it is not possible to hide it entirely to make room for more apps or links in the Start Menu. How to hide Recommended items in Windows 11's Start Menu
  15. Microsoft removes Window 11 hack to enable Windows 10 Start Menu Microsoft removed a registry hack in the latest preview build that allowed Windows 11 users to revert to the "Classic" Windows 10 Start Menu. When the Windows 11 preview build was leaked in June, one of the most significant and most controversial changes was a new floating Start Menu centered in the middle of the Taskbar. This new Start Menu was taken from the now-shelved Windows 10X and includes a redesigned interface with the removal of app groups and Live Tiles. Windows 11 Start Menu For those who did not like the new Start Menu, it was possible to use a Registry hack to revert to a "Classic Mode," the Windows 10 Start Menu. To switch to the Windows 10 Start Menu, users could create the 'Start_ShowClassicMode' value and set it to 1 under the HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Explorer\Advanced registry key. Once you created the registry value and restarted the Windows Explorer process, the old Start Menu would be available again, as shown below. Windows 10 Start Menu in Windows 11 On Thursday, Microsoft released Windows 11 build 22000.65 to Insiders on the 'Dev' channel. Unfortunately, after installing the new cumulative update, users could no longer use the Registry hack to bring back the old Start Menu. BleepingComputer has also independently confirmed that the Registry hack no longer works, but it is unclear whether Microsoft will enable it again in the future. BleepingComputer has reached out to Microsoft to learn more about this change but has not heard back at this time. Thx to Jacob for the tip. Microsoft removes Window 11 hack to enable Windows 10 Start Menu
  16. What a centered Start Menu means for users in Windows 11 Windows 11 was leaked earlier this week and new features of the upcoming operating system are showcased on social media sites and blogs. One screenshot, which you may have seen published everywhere, shows the new centered Start Menu and taskbar layout of the operating system. It appears that users of the operating system may align the Start Menu to the left and right as well. The classic version has the Start button displayed on the left side, and the icons that are pinned and the programs that are open next to it on its right side. A centered Start menu and taskbar is not entirely new. Programs like CenterTaskbar or FalconX provide similar functionality to users who install the software programs. A core difference between these third-party applications and Microsoft's Windows 11 taskbar design is, that the Start button is centered as well in Windows 11. One of the ideas behind displaying the icons on the taskbar in the center is that it improves accessibility. Instead of having to move the mouse cursor all the way to the left, icons are now reachable in the center. One of the main differences between a centered and a left- or right-aligned layout is that the centered icons are not in fixed positions. When you open a new program, all icons are realigned on the taskbar to keep them in the centered position; this means, that the Start button will not be in a fixed position either, as it will wander from its position on system start to the left whenever programs with taskbar icons are opened, and to the right when programs are closed that are not displayed permanently on the taskbar. Windows 11 users who open just a few programs during a workday or at home may not see a lot of movement, but this is not the case for users of the operating system who open and close lots of programs. Granted, this is not a critical change that is going to delay taskbar operations by much, but it may still impact a user's workflow negatively. Windows 11 users who prefer the left-aligned taskbar layout can restore it easily, at least in the leaked build. We will know more next week when Microsoft will reveal the next version of the Windows operating system officially. Now You: what is your preference in regards to the taskbar? Left, centered or right? Small or large buttons? Bottom position, sides, or top? What a centered Start Menu means for users in Windows 11
  17. Don’t like the new Windows 11 Start Menu? You can easily bring back the old Windows 10 version Probably the most controversial element of the new Windows 11 OS is the new Start Menu, which brings a more tablet-like home screen to the OS. Of course, we know Windows 11 is merely Windows 10 with some lipstick, and if you have grown accustomed to the old Windows 10 Start Menu, it is pretty easy to re-enable it in Windows 11. All you have to do is: Open Regedit Navigate to HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Microsoft\ Windows\CurrentVersion\Explorer\Advanced\ Create a new DWord called Start_ShowClassicMode Set its value to 1. If this sounds like gobbledygook to you, you should probably not be using a registry editor. You can also move the Start button using the option in Settings under Personalization > Task bar, at which point the OS will be virtually indistinguishable from Windows 10, save for a few more rounded corners. via Rafael Rivera Don’t like the new Windows 11 Start Menu? You can easily bring back the old Windows 10 version
  18. Windows 11 users report a strange upgrade experience where the operating system continues to show the Windows 10 taskbar, while everything else uses the new Windows 11 user interface. When a new version of Windows is released, there are always reports of strange behavior with the Start Menu, taskbar, or other operating system features. However, after upgrading to Windows 11, some users have reported bizarre [1, 2] results where the new operating system becomes a hybrid of Windows 10 and Windows 11. In a post on Reddit, a user shared a screenshot of Windows 11 showing that the new operating system continued to use the Windows 10 taskbar and the Start Menu no longer worked. "Updated to Windows 11 using Microsoft's official update assistant . I still have the old taskbar and the start menu doesn't work at all," reads a Reddit topic. Windows 11 retaining the Windows 10 taskbar Soon after posting about the issue, other Reddit users began commenting that they, too, experienced similar behavior. One of the people affected by these issues issue told BleepingComputer that other than these issues, everything else in Windows 11 used the new user interface design. This same issue was also seen when Windows 11 build 22000.194 was tested in the Insider preview program. To fix these issues, users experimented with uninstalling the latest Windows 11 cumulative update, which worked in some cases. Other users forced others to create a brand new user profile to fix the issue. However, users then need to copy their data to the new profile and potentially reinstall some applications. As the new profile is resolving the issue, it could be a Registry corruption or an existing setting causing the problem. With numerous features missing from the Windows 11 taskbar, such as the right-click context menu and the ability to ungroup windows, one user saw this bug as a good thing. BleepingComputer has reached out to Microsoft to see if they had any advice for users but have not heard back at this time. Windows 11 upgrades show Windows 10 Start Menu for some users
  19. IObit StartMenu 8 brings back the Windows “Start” Menu. It is specially designed for Windows 8. IObit StartMenu8 offers a perfect solution for users who work with Windows Start Menu all the time and are not accustomed to the new Metro start screen in Windows 8. This smart tool brings back both the start button and Windows Start Menu, and offers the option to skip Metro start page, allowing users who only work on desktop to boot to Windows 8 desktop directly. It’s the best start menu replacement for Windows8. Key Benefits: • More Efficiency and Convenience StartMenu8 not only brings back the convenient Start Menu to Windows 8, but also allows you to bypass Metro screen on start of Windows 8 and boot to desktop directly. • Easily Switch between Metro and Desktop Interface You can easily switch between two modes by pressing and holding the Windows key, depending on your preference. • Faster Access to Programs and Files StartMenu8 brings back Start Menu where you can get quicker access to programs, documents and files, control panel and settings. • Quicker Searching Unified and instant searching for both desktop and Metro apps decreases the time taken in searching and makes your work • Customizable to Your Needs You can pin programs to Start Menu and Taskbar for quicker access to your favorite programs. It’s easily customizable to have everything you need at just one click. Operating System: Windows XP, Vista, 7, 8/8.1, 10 What's New: + Optimized the display of recent history to be faster and more accurate. + More accurate detection for Modern apps. + Fixed known bugs. Homepage: https://www.iobit.com/en/iobitstartmenu8.php Installer: http://update.iobit.com/dl/sm8-setup.exe Medicine by ARMOUR:
  20. vissha

    StartAllBack 3.3.0.4275

    Introducing StartAllBack: Windows 11 from better timeline, Embrace, enhance, unsweep classic UI from under the rug. Restore and improve taskbar • Show labels on task icons • Adjust icon size and margins • Move taskbar to top, left or right edges • Drag and drop stuff onto taskbar • Center task icons but keep Start button on the left • Split into segments, use dynamic translucency • Separate corner icons with Windows 7/10 UI Restore and improve File Explorer UI • Ribbon and Command Bar revamped with translucent effects • Details pane on bottom • Old search box (the one which works) • Dark mode support for more dialogs Restore and improve context menus • All new look with rounded acrylic menus • Fast and responsive taskbar menus • New fonts, better touch support Restore and improve start menu • Launch apps and go to system places in one click • Navigate dropdown menus like a boss • Enjoy fast and reliable search Finally, lightweight styling and UI consistency • Enjoy Windows 7, Windows 10 and third-party taskbar and start menu styles • Fix UI inconsistencies in Win32 apps • Don't be blue: recolor UI in all windows apps • Negative resource usage: fewer RAM used, fewer processes started Version 3.3 11 February 2022 Dark mode improvements for Explorer and Control Panel Weather widget taskbar integration Acrylic classic tooltips Home: https://www.startallback.com/ Downloads: Installer: https://s3.amazonaws.com/startisback/StartAllBack_3.3_setup.exe Fix Only - DLL: Site: https://www.mirrored.to Sharecode [?]: /files/04BOJBGR/StartAllBack_3.3.0.4275_Patch_DLL_Only.rar_links FYI by BTCR & NitrogenRuBoard: Installer + Fix DLL: Site: https://www.mirrored.to Sharecode [?]: /files/0OV2YBZB/StartAllBack.3.3.0.4275_-_Installer___Fix_DLL.rar_links
  21. Introducing StartAllBack: Windows 11 from better timeline, Embrace, enhance, unsweep classic UI from under the rug. Restore and improve taskbar • Show labels on task icons • Adjust icon size and margins • Move taskbar to top, left or right edges • Drag and drop stuff onto taskbar • Center task icons but keep Start button on the left • Split into segments, use dynamic translucency • Separate corner icons with Windows 7/10 UI Restore and improve File Explorer UI • Ribbon and Command Bar revamped with translucent effects • Details pane on bottom • Old search box (the one which works) • Dark mode support for more dialogs Restore and improve context menus • All new look with rounded acrylic menus • Fast and responsive taskbar menus • New fonts, better touch support Restore and improve start menu • Launch apps and go to system places in one click • Navigate dropdown menus like a boss • Enjoy fast and reliable search Finally, lightweight styling and UI consistency • Enjoy Windows 7, Windows 10 and third-party taskbar and start menu styles • Fix UI inconsistencies in Win32 apps • Don't be blue: recolor UI in all windows apps • Negative resource usage: fewer RAM used, fewer processes started What's New: - Dark Mode for Windows 7 file transfer dialogs - Dark variants for checkboxes/radiobuttons/progressbar Home: https://www.startallback.com/ Downloads: Installer: https://s3.amazonaws.com/startisback/StartAllBack_3.2.9d_setup.exe Fix Only: Site: https://www.mirrored.to Sharecode [?]: /files/0AWWBY8A/StartAllBack.3.2.9.4260d_-_Fix_Only.rar_links FYI by BTCR & NitrogenRuBoard: Installer + Fix: Site: https://www.mirrored.to Sharecode [?]: /files/1B1POWCE/StartAllBack.3.2.9.4260d_-_Installer___Fix.rar_links
  22. vissha

    StartAllBack 3.3.0.4272

    Introducing StartAllBack: Windows 11 from better timeline, Embrace, enhance, unsweep classic UI from under the rug. Restore and improve taskbar • Show labels on task icons • Adjust icon size and margins • Move taskbar to top, left or right edges • Drag and drop stuff onto taskbar • Center task icons but keep Start button on the left • Split into segments, use dynamic translucency • Separate corner icons with Windows 7/10 UI Restore and improve File Explorer UI • Ribbon and Command Bar revamped with translucent effects • Details pane on bottom • Old search box (the one which works) • Dark mode support for more dialogs Restore and improve context menus • All new look with rounded acrylic menus • Fast and responsive taskbar menus • New fonts, better touch support Restore and improve start menu • Launch apps and go to system places in one click • Navigate dropdown menus like a boss • Enjoy fast and reliable search Finally, lightweight styling and UI consistency • Enjoy Windows 7, Windows 10 and third-party taskbar and start menu styles • Fix UI inconsistencies in Win32 apps • Don't be blue: recolor UI in all windows apps • Negative resource usage: fewer RAM used, fewer processes started Version 3.3 11 February 2022 Dark mode improvements for Explorer and Control Panel Weather widget taskbar integration Acrylic classic tooltips Home: https://www.startallback.com/ Downloads: Installer: https://s3.amazonaws.com/startisback/StartAllBack_3.3_setup.exe Fix Only - DLL: Site: https://www.mirrored.to Sharecode [?]: /files/1G6ICZOI/StartAllBack_3.3.0.4272_Patch_DLL_Only.zip_links FYI by BTCR & NitrogenRuBoard: Installer + Fix DLL: Site: https://www.mirrored.to Sharecode [?]: /files/0OQFUTUU/StartAllBack.3.3.0.4272_-_Installer___Fix_DLL.rar_links
  23. vissha

    StartAllBack 3.3.0.4270

    Introducing StartAllBack: Windows 11 from better timeline, Embrace, enhance, unsweep classic UI from under the rug. Restore and improve taskbar • Show labels on task icons • Adjust icon size and margins • Move taskbar to top, left or right edges • Drag and drop stuff onto taskbar • Center task icons but keep Start button on the left • Split into segments, use dynamic translucency • Separate corner icons with Windows 7/10 UI Restore and improve File Explorer UI • Ribbon and Command Bar revamped with translucent effects • Details pane on bottom • Old search box (the one which works) • Dark mode support for more dialogs Restore and improve context menus • All new look with rounded acrylic menus • Fast and responsive taskbar menus • New fonts, better touch support Restore and improve start menu • Launch apps and go to system places in one click • Navigate dropdown menus like a boss • Enjoy fast and reliable search Finally, lightweight styling and UI consistency • Enjoy Windows 7, Windows 10 and third-party taskbar and start menu styles • Fix UI inconsistencies in Win32 apps • Don't be blue: recolor UI in all windows apps • Negative resource usage: fewer RAM used, fewer processes started Version 3.3 11 February 2022 Dark mode improvements for Explorer and Control Panel Weather widget taskbar integration Acrylic classic tooltips Home: https://www.startallback.com/ Downloads: Installer: https://s3.amazonaws.com/startisback/StartAllBack_3.3_setup.exe Fix Only - DLL: Site: https://www.mirrored.to Sharecode [?]: /files/YRHEOI6N/StartAllBack_3.3.0.4270_Patch_DLL_Only.zip_links FYI by BTCR & NitrogenRuBoard: Installer + Fix DLL: Site: https://www.mirrored.to Sharecode [?]: /files/0W8YWDDQ/StartAllBack.3.3.0.4270_-_Installer___Fix_DLL.rar_links
  24. The next Windows 10 update will give the Start Menu a facelift - and you can get it now Windows Insiders can test out the new theme-aware Start Menu and other 20H2 features now (Image credit: Microsoft) After launching version 2004 of Windows 10 back in May, Microsoft is now preparing to release its next big update for the operating system called version 20H2 which will performance enhancements, bug fixes and a new theme-aware Start Menu. The software giant first showed off its new theme-aware Start Menu earlier this year in a sneak peek posted on social media and senior program manager of the Windows Insider Program, Brandon LeBlanc provided further insight in a blog post, saying: “We are freshening up the Start menu with a more streamlined design that removes the solid color backplates behind the logos in the apps list and applies a uniform, partially transparent background to the tiles. This design creates a beautiful stage for your apps, especially the Fluent Design icons for Office and Microsoft Edge, as well as the redesigned icons for built-in apps like Calculator, Mail, and Calendar that we started rolling out earlier this year.” While the new theme-aware Start Menu can be used with both Windows 10's light and dark theme, users can also add a splash of color to their icons by turning on dark theme and toggling on the “Show accent color on the following surfaces” option under Settings > Personalization > Color. Theme-aware Start Menu Windows 10's 20H2 update will be available to all users in the fall but if you want to test out the new theme-aware Start Menu for yourself, you can do so now via Windows Update after joining the Windows Insider program. To join the Windows Insider program, you will need to open Windows 10's Settings, go to the Update & Security section and navigate to the Windows Insider Program tab. From here, click Get Started, link your Microsoft account, select the Beta Channel Option, restart your system, then go back to the Update & Security section in settings and have Windows Update check for updates. The update for Windows 10 version 20H2 will be there and you can download and install it and then restart your system to finish the installation. Keep in mind that you may have to wait for 24 to 48 hours after joining the Windows Insider program before the update shows up. Alternatively, if you have Build 19041.423 of Windows 10 installed on your system, you can unlock the new 20H2 features including the new Start Menu by tweaking your registry. However, this method is a bit more risky and users should make a backup of the registry before proceeding. Via BleepingComputer The next Windows 10 update will give the Start Menu a facelift - and you can get it now
  25. How to display or hide the apps you use most often in the Windows 10 Start Menu The Windows 10 Start Menu does a lot of things differently than the start menus of previous versions of Windows. Its tile-based layout, the list of all installed apps and programs, and its design need to be mentioned in this regard. When you look at the "all apps" listing, you may notice several listings attached to the top of it. By default, Windows 10 lists suggestions and recent installations of apps and programs. The latter is useful to launch programs you just installed quickly on the device, especially if the application did not start automatically after installation. Windows 10 includes another handy option; you can display the list of most used applications and programs at the top of the Start Menu to access these quickly. Some users may not need these, as most or even all of the apps and programs may be pinned to the taskbar or be available as desktop shortcuts. Another reason for hiding the listing is that it pushes the regular application listing down in the Start menu. Others may find the listing useful as it provides quick access to often used programs on the system. The screenshot that you see above lists the six most used applications and programs on the test system. Windows lists Universal Windows Platform apps and Win32 applications there. The feature is controlled via the Settings application. Here is how you turn it on or off: Use the Windows-I keyboard shortcut to open the Settings application on the Windows 10 device. Go to Personalization > Start. Locate the "Show most used apps" option on the page, and toggle it. On means that the feature is enabled and that the most used applications are listed in the Start Menu. Off means it is disabled, and no such group is displayed in the Windows 10 Start Menu. The change takes effect immediately. Tip: you find other display options listed there, including the following ones: Show recently added apps -- displays apps and programs that were installed recently on the device. Show suggestions occasionally in Start -- displays application suggestions, Bing searches, and other suggestions when enabled. How to display or hide the apps you use most often in the Windows 10 Start Menu
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