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  1. Sprint Exposed Customer Support Site to Web Fresh on the heels of a disclosure that Microsoft Corp. leaked internal customer support data to the Internet, mobile provider Sprint has addressed a mix-up in which posts to a private customer support community were exposed to the Web. KrebsOnSecurity recently contacted Sprint to let the company know that an internal customer support forum called “Social Care” was being indexed by search engines, and that several months worth of postings about customer complaints and other issues were viewable without authentication to anyone with a Web browser. A redacted screen shot of one Sprint customer support thread exposed to the Web. A Sprint spokesperson responded that the forum was indeed intended to be a private section of its support community, but that an error caused the section to become public. “These conversations include minimal customer information and are used for frontline reps to escalate issues to managers,” said Lisa Belot, Sprint’s communications manager. A review of the exposed support forum by this author suggests that while none of the posts exposed customer information such as payment card data, a number of them did include customer account information, such customer names, device identifiers and in some cases location information. Perhaps more importantly for Sprint and its customers, the forum also included numerous links and references to internal tools and procedures. This sort of information would no doubt be of interest to scammers seeking to conduct social engineering attacks against Sprint employees as way to perpetrate other types of fraud, including unauthorized SIM swaps or in gleaning more account information from targeted customers. Earlier this week, vice.com reported that hackers are phishing workers at major U.S. telecommunications companies to gain access to internal company tools. That news followed a related Vice report earlier this month which found ne’er-do-wells are now getting telecom employees to run software that lets the hackers directly reach into the internal systems of U.S. telecom companies to take over customer cell phone numbers. The misstep by Sprint comes just days after Microsoft acknowledged that a database containing “a subset of information related to customer support interactions was accessible to the internet between the dates of Dec. 5 and Dec. 31, 2019.” Microsoft said it was alerting individuals whose information was exposed, which included location information, email and IP addresses, telephone numbers and descriptions of technical issues. A message Microsoft sent to customers affected by their recent leak of customer support data. This week marked the annual observance of Data Privacy Day, an occasion in which we are reminded to be more judicious about the types of personal information we voluntarily share on social media and other Web sites. But both the Microsoft and Sprint stumbles are a reminder that billion-dollar companies very often expose this information on our behalf, even when we are doing everything within our power to safeguard it. Source: Sprint Exposed Customer Support Site to Web (KrebsOnSecurity - Brian Krebs)
  2. Sprint says hackers breached customer accounts via Samsung website Hackers had access to customer info such as names, billing, device details, and more. CBS Interactive/CNET US mobile network operator Sprint said hackers broke into an unknown number of customer accounts via the Samsung.com "add a line" website. "On June 22, Sprint was informed of unauthorized access to your Sprint account using your account credentials via the Samsung.com 'add a line' website," Sprint said in a letter it is sending impacted customers. "The personal information of yours that may have been viewed includes the following: phone number, device type, device ID, monthly recurring charges, subscriber ID, account number, account creation date, upgrade eligibility, first and last name, billing address and add-on services," the US telco said. Sprint said the information hackers had access to did not pose "a substantial risk of fraud or identity theft," although, many might disagree with its assessment. The company said it re-secured all compromised accounts by resetting PIN codes, three days later, on June 25. UNKNOWN NUMBER OF COMPROMISED ACCOUNTS The Sprint account breach notification lacks a few important details, such as the number of breached accounts, the date when hackers first started accessing Sprint accounts via the Samsung.com website, and if hackers modified any customer account details. ZDNet reached out to Sprint with all these questions, along with an inquiry of how Sprint discovered the breach in the first place. A spokesperson did not respond in time for this article's publication. This is the second account breach notification letter Sprint is sending this year. The company also suffered another breach via Boost Mobile, a virtual mobile network and Sprint subsidiary. In May, Sprint said hackers used Boost phone numbers and Boost.com PIN codes to access users' Sprint accounts. Source: Sprint says hackers breached customer accounts via Samsung website
  3. Following in the footsteps of AT&T and Verizon*, Sprint is now offering an LTE tracker. The matchbook-sized device, simply called Tracker, provides real-time location tracking on Safe + Found app. he Tracker competes with Tile, but instead of Bluetooth, Sprint’s device uses 4G LTE, GPS and Wi-Fi location services, so it can be used to track things, people or pets that might travel a significant distance away, compared to a range of 100 ft to 300 ft for Tile (depending on the version). The Tracker is manufactured by Coolpad and users need to pay $2.50 per month for 24 months to cover the cost of the device, plus an additional $5 per month to connect it. AT&T and Verizon both launched LTE trackers over the past year and Apple is also rumored to be working on a tracking device that connects to iPhones, based on an asset package for pairing devices by proximity spotted in the first beta of iOS 13 by 9to5Mac. Source
  4. It's been well over a year since Sprint and T-Mobile, the third and fourth-largest carriers in the United States, announced their plans to merge into a new company, referred to as New T-Mobile. The deal has faced some friction from regulators, with requirements including the creation of a new carrier to take the place left behind by the merger. Nonetheless, back in July, the Department of Justice finally approved of the merger deal, and now, the Federal Communications Commission has, too. As reported by Reuters, the FCC voted to approve the merger between the two companies, with votes aligning with the party split among the FCC commissioners. That is to say, the three Republican commissioners - including chairman Ajit Pai - voted favorably towards the deal, with the two Democratic commissioners voting against it. The decision marks another step towards the completion of the deal, but it is not the final one. A group of state attorneys general has previously filed a lawsuit against the merger, and the results of that process are yet unknown. The main reasons for this friction have to do with potential job cuts, since there is likely to be some redundancy between positions currently occupied in both companies, and reduced competition. The latter point may have been partly addressed with the promise to sell off Boost Mobile, which is part of the reason the deal got approval from the Department of Justice and the FCC. That may not be enough to deter the ongoing lawsuit, however. Source: Sprint and T-Mobile merger one step closer to reality with FCC approval (via Neowin)
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