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  1. Facebook sues two Chrome extension devs for scraping user data Facebook filed a lawsuit today in Portugal against browser extension maker Oink and Stuff. Image: Kon Karampelas Facebook filed a lawsuit today in Portugal against two Portuguese nationals for developing browser extensions that scraped user data from Facebook sites. "When people installed these extensions on their browsers, they were installing concealed code designed to scrape their information from the Facebook website, but also information from the users' browsers unrelated to Facebook — a
  2. In a new lawsuit filed in the US, Nintendo sues an Amazon seller who distributed RCM Loader, a device that the company claims has the sole purpose of allowing people to play pirated video games by circumventing the Switch console's technological protection measures. On top, Nintendo is also suing the defendant for abusing the DMCA's counter-notification system. Nintendo’s ongoing battle to prevent people from playing pirated content on Switch consoles is showing no signs of slowing down. Its main targets thus far have been distributors and s
  3. WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Alphabet Inc’s Google and the U.S. Justice Department have failed to reach agreement over a protective order for third parties like Microsoft that provided data to the government for its lawsuit against the search and advertising giant. Google is pressing for two in-house attorneys to have access to the confidential data while the Justice Department and state attorneys general involved in the lawsuit have disagreed, Google said in a court filing on Friday. Google stated it needed the information to prepare an effective defense. It offered to
  4. The makers of the films 'Ava' and 'Rambo V: Last Blood' have filed a lawsuit targeting 16 alleged movie pirates. The complaint suggests that the defendants are registered users of the popular torrent site RARBG, but provides no proof for this allegation. The film companies do have evidence that the IP-addresses were caught sharing torrent files. Lawsuits against alleged movie pirates are nothing new. We have reported on many dozens over the years. More recently, Hawaii-based attorney Kerry Culpepper added a new element to these cases when he
  5. The makers of the film 'Angel Has Fallen' have filed a lawsuit against seventeen alleged pirates. According to the complaint, several defendants used the VPN service 'Private Internet Access,' which can expect to be subpoenaed. That effort will likely be fruitless as the VPN doesn't keep any logs. However, with help from information shared by torrent site YTS, users are still at risk. Millions of Internet users around the world use a VPN to protect their privacy online. Another key benefit is that VPNs hide users’ true IP-address, making the
  6. US-broadcaster DISH Network is suing a former reseller of IPTV services SET TV and Simply-TV in a Florida court. It's alleged that the defendant continued to sell pirate IPTV subscriptions under various brands, even after DISH obtained damages awards of $120m and an order to prevent ongoing violations. Back in 2018, broadcaster DISH Network sued pirate IPTV service SET TV for offering numerous TV channels that had been illegally obtained from DISH’s satellite service. In November 2018 that particular lawsuit came to end when SET TV’s operato
  7. Plex has failed in its initial legal action to prevent new streaming service Zee Plex from using the word 'Plex' in its branding. The High Court in Bombay found that low domestic sales for Plex, a fundamental difference in services offered by the parties, plus no evidence of "passing off" or anticipated injuries all went against Plex. Early September, Indian media company Zee Entertainment Enterprises revealed it would soon launch a brand new streaming service with the aim of premiering blockbuster movies directly to people’s homes, partly to combat piracy.
  8. Several movie companies have filed a new lawsuit targeting three users of the popular torrent site YTS. The alleged pirates were identified based on data that was previously provided by the site's operator. The three were initially approached for an out-of-court settlement but, according to the rightsholders, they failed to respond. In recent years, YTS.mx has become one of the most-used torrent sites, serving millions of visitors a day. The site can be used without registering an account. However, those who sign up get some extra features,
  9. The company behind the war drama film The Outpost has filed a mass copyright infringement lawsuit in Canada. The statement of claim targets 841 'Doe' defendants who allegedly downloaded and shared the movie, demanding an injunction plus damages under the Copyright Act. The claim states that all defendants ignored two warnings to cease and desist. Mass lawsuits targeting Internet subscribers who allegedly downloaded and/or shared copyrighted material have been a common tactic for content companies over more than 15 years. The targets are near
  10. Technology giant Samsung is being sued for $1.3 million by content protection company Verance. According to a lawsuit filed in the US, for two years Samsung failed to pay licensing fees for use of Cinavia, the anti-piracy technology that aims to prevent copied or downloaded content being played on Blu-ray disc players. For at least two decades, entertainment companies have been trying to prevent people from copying commercially produced DVDs and more recently Blu-ray discs. In common with most anti-piracy technologies the protections deploye
  11. A class-action lawsuit, filed against YouTube by Grammy award-winning musician Maria Schneider and Pirate Monitor Ltd, has taken an unexpected turn. According to YouTube, Pirate Monitor first used bogus accounts to upload its own videos. It then filed DMCA notices to have the same content removed in a ploy to gain fraudulent access to Content ID management tools. Early July, Grammy award-winning musician Maria Schneider teamed up with Virgin Islands-based Pirate Monitor Ltd in a class action lawsuit targeting YouTube. Filed in a California c
  12. Facebook is being sued by an Instagram user who claims the social media giant spied on users through their iPhone cameras. Brittany Conditi, who filed the lawsuit, said Facebook accessed Instagram users’ cameras even when they weren’t taking pictures or videos. Users first noticed a green FaceTime symbol appear on their phones when they were scrolling through their Instagram news feeds in July. Facebook has denied spying, and blamed a bug. Facebook is being sued over claims it spied on Instagram users through their iPhone cameras.
  13. Alphabet Inc.'s Google faces a multibillion-dollar lawsuit in Britain over claims that YouTube routinely breaks privacy laws by tracking children online. The suit, filed on behalf of more than five million British children under 13 and their parents, is being brought by privacy campaigner Duncan McCann and being supported by Foxglove, a tech justice group. The claimants estimate that if they’re successful, there would be as much as $3.2 billion (2.5 billion pounds) in compensation, worth 100 to 500 pounds per child.
  14. Internet provider Bright House Networks has countersued several major record labels, alleging that they sent false and deceptive piracy notices to its subscribers. This week, the company asked the court for permission to add the RIAA and its anti-piracy partner MarkMonitor to the suit, as they are central to the wrongful conduct. Last year, a group of major music companies sued Internet provider Bright House Networks, a subsidiary of Charter Communications. The lawsuit claimed that the ISPs failed to terminate repeat infringers. By keeping pirates
  15. Belgium plans to sue Google over the tech giant’s refusal to blur sensitive military sites and nuclear power plants on the company’s various mapping platforms. Military leaders in Belgium have not yet filed a formal complaint but confirmed to Reuters that they intend to sue. File photo of the nuclear power plant of Tihange in Belgium “It’s a shame the Belgium Department of Defense have decided to take this decision. We have been working closely with them for more than two years, making changes to our maps where asked and legal under Belgian law. We plan to continue
  16. A New York man has been landed with a huge lawsuit worth more than $32.2m after he was found to be uploading UFC content to The Pirate Bay and KickassTorrents. Known online as Secludedly, the man uploaded at least 124 events. As a result UFC parent Zuffa is hitting him with everything from copyright infringement, to fraud, to breach of contract. http://thepiratebay.se,” the lawsuit reads. For these “willful violations”, Zuffa is claiming up to the maximum of $110,000 for each of the alleged 124 offenses, potentially another $13.64m in damages. In a third count, Zuffa seeks up to $60,000 after
  17. In a surprise move Quentin Tarantino has withdrawn his lawsuit against online media company Gawker. The sides had been in dispute over the leak of his potential movie script 'The Hateful Eight', with Tarantino accusing Gawker of both contributory and direct infringement. The lawsuit can be refiled, however, so a sequel might be just around the corner... Just when it seemed that Tarantino and his legal team were in for the long haul against Gawker, things have taken a turn for the unusual. After his initial lawsuit over the leak of his script ‘The Hateful Eight’ was kicked out by a judge due
  18. Lionsgate has filed a lawsuit against six file-sharing sites that allegedly distributed leaked copies of The Expendables 3 film. The movie studio claims that the sites in question failed to respond to takedown requests. Lionsgate demands a permanent injunction to stop further distribution of the film, as well as seizure of the sites' domain names and bank accounts. Last week saw the leak online of the brand new Expendables movie. Scheduled for an August 15 U.S. release, Expendables 3 leaked in near DVD quality a full two weeks ahead. The timing and quality combined to make the leak one of t
  19. This week the possibility emerged that the ongoing government shutdown could delay net neutrality’s day in court — but the court was not sympathetic to the FCC’s request that the lawsuit be put off. Oral arguments for this major challenge to the agency’s rollback of 2015’s internet regulations will go ahead as planned on February 1. During a shutdown, federal employees — including government lawyers — must have specific authorization to continue working, since it’s illegal for them to do so without pay. In this case a judge on the case must effectively mak
  20. The chip makers claims TSMC violates its patents. The competition between semiconductor giants is getting ugly, and it could have an unfortunate impact on many of the devices you buy. GlobalFoundries has sued the Taiwanese firm TSMC for allegedly violating 16 patents tied to its chip production business, including ones for semiconductor interconnects and the common FinFET design used in newer processors. The multiple lawsuits (plus complaints at the US International Trade Commission) claim 20 tech companies are infr
  21. Twenty-two women have won $12.75 million in a years-long lawsuit alleging a predatory scheme by GirlsDoPorn, a site that hosts purportedly one-time pornographic videos featuring “amateur” college-age women and teen girls. The women provided evidence that the company lured them into shoots under false pretenses, intimidated and coerced them into performing, and shared the images online without their consent. They sued a total of 13 affiliated businesses and individuals, including owner Michael Pratt, actor Andre Garcia, and videographer Matthew Wolfe. Screenshot: Michael Pratt
  22. LA wants Uber’s location data, but the ride-hailing company says it’s worried about privacy The fight between the city of Los Angeles and scooter companies over location data is heating up. On Monday, Uber filed a lawsuit against LA’s Department of Transportation (LADOT) pushing back against the requirement that scooter operators share anonymized real-time location data with the city. The suit, which was first reported by CNET but has yet to be filed in LA Superior Court, centers on LADOT’s use of a digital tool called the mobility data specification
  23. Vimeo is under fire for allegedly collecting and storing users’ facial biometrics in videos and photos without their consent or knowledge. Vimeo, the popular ad-free video platform, is facing a lawsuit that alleges it stored people’s facial biometrics without their consent or knowledge. The lawsuit, which was filed on Sept. 20, claims Vimeo violated the Illinois Biometrics Information Privacy Act (BIPA). This is a law that imposes requirements on businesses that collect or otherwise obtain biometric information, including fingerprints, retina sc
  24. Ubisoft takes Rainbow Six Siege's top DDoS attackers to court. What you need to know Ubisoft has targeted individuals behind third-party Rainbow Six Siege distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) services in a new lawsuit. The lawsuit claims the subscription services "are continuing to cause, serious and irreparable harm to Ubisoft," amid ongoing efforts to tackle cheaters in the tactical shooter. It follows a prior initiative from Ubisoft, outlining gameplay, technical, and legal action, resulting in a 93 percent drop in DDoS
  25. MOSCOW (Reuters) - A Russian court has blocked access to English Premier League game broadcasts by Amazon’s Twitch after Russia’s Rambler media group said it would sue the video streaming service over pirate broadcasts, the TASS news agency reported. Rambler plans to sue Twitch for 180 billion roubles ($2.82 billion) in a Russian court for what it said were 36,000 cases in which Twitch had violated its rights to broadcast the soccer games, the Kommersant newspaper reported earlier on Monday. The Moscow District Court said it planned to hear the case on Dec.
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