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  1. Intel will make Qualcomm chips in new foundry deal In addition to providing chip packaging for Amazon’s AWS business Intel has announced its first major customer for its new Intel Foundry Services business: Qualcomm. Best known for designing the Snapdragon chips that power most major Android phones, Qualcomm will start to have its chips manufactured by Intel in the coming years using Intel’s upcoming 20A process. No timeframe has been announced for when the first Intel-made Qualcomm chips will arrive or which of Qualcomm’s products Intel will produce. Additionally, Amazon’s AWS will be working with Intel Foundry Services, relying on Intel’s packaging solutions (although Intel won’t be directly making chips for Amazon). Qualcomm will rely on Intel’s newly announced Intel 20A technology node, scheduled for release in 2024. Intel 20A will introduce a new transistor architecture, RibbonFET, Intel’s first since 2011. Intel previously announced its new foundry business as part of new CEO Pat Gelsinger’s “IDM 2.0” strategy shortly after he took the reins of the company. Intel Foundry Services was a key part of that plan, one that would see Intel expand beyond making its own chips to handle production for third-party companies. Qualcomm and Amazon mark the first — and the highest-profile — partners that Intel has announced so far for IFS, although Gelsinger has previously mentioned that Intel is in talks with over 100 companies for foundry work. Intel will make Qualcomm chips in new foundry deal
  2. Intel has a new architecture roadmap and a plan to retake its chipmaking crown in 2025 All the news from Intel Acclerated Intel is rethinking how it releases — and brands — its semiconductor innovations, CEO Pat Gelsinger announced today at the company’s Intel Accelerated webcast. The announcement includes the broad strokes of the next half-decade of Intel’s processor roadmap, new chip and packaging technologies, and a promise of an “annual cadence of innovation,” with the ultimate goal of seeing Intel retake its leadership in the processor space by 2025. Future Intel products (starting as early as its upcoming 12th Gen Alder Lake chips later this year) will no longer use the nanometer-based node nomenclature that both it and the rest of the chipmaking industry has used for years. Instead, Intel is debuting a new naming scheme that it says will provide “a more accurate view of process nodes across the industry” and how Intel’s products fit into that landscape. How that works in practice is that those new third-generation 10nm chips will be referred to as “Intel 7,” instead of getting some 10nm-based name (like last year’s 10nm SuperFin chips). At first glance, it sounds a lot like a cheap marketing tactic designed to make Intel’s upcoming 10nm chips look more competitive next to products from AMD, which are already on TSMC’s 7nm node, or Apple’s 5nm M1 chips. And while that’s technically true, it’s not as unfair of a comparison as it necessarily looks. In modern semiconductors, node names don’t actually refer to the size of a transistor on a chip: thanks to advances like 3D packaging technologies and the physical realities of semiconductor design, that hasn’t been the case since 1997 (as noted by ExtremeTech). And from a technical perspective, Intel’s 10nm chips are broadly on par with “7nm” branded hardware from competitors like TSMC or Samsung, using similar production technologies and offering comparable transistor density. That’s something that translates to commercial hardware, too: we’ve already seen that Intel’s current 10nm chips are still competitive with AMD’s cutting-edge 7nm Ryzen chips, for example. All that is to say that Intel’s rebranding here isn’t entirely unfair to see, even if it does make it harder to parse when those bigger “node” change advances are happening with the new nomenclature. Intel’s updated roadmap and node naming Image: Intel Here’s a look at Intel’s new roadmap and what it all actually means. • Intel 7 is the new name for what would have been Intel’s third-generation 10nm technology and the successor to Intel’s 10nm SuperFin (aka Intel’s second-generation 10nm chips, found most notably in its 11th Gen Tiger Lake chips). Intel says that the new Intel 7 hardware will offer approximately 10 percent to 15 percent improvements in performance-per-watt compared to the previous generation — or, as is always the case, improved power efficiency and battery life should hardware manufacturers prefer to keep performance the same. The first Intel 7-based products will show up as early as this year, with the already previewed Alder Lake chips coming at the end of 2021 for consumer products, and the upcoming Sapphire Rapids chips in 2022 for data centers. • Intel 4 is the architecture formally known as Intel’s 7nm process, which Intel infamously was forced to delay out to 2023 last summer following manufacturing issues. Originally planned for 2021, it’s the next major jump in technology for Intel, using EUV (extreme ultraviolet) technology — something already utilized by Samsung and TSMC’s 5nm node products, for comparison. It’ll still use the same broad FinFET transistor architecture that Intel’s been using since 2011. Thanks to all those improvements, Intel 4 is expected to feature a transistor density of about 200-250 million transistors per mm², compared to about 171.30 million transistors per mm² on TSMC’s current 5nm node. Intel says that Intel 4 will offer an approximately 20 percent jump in performance-per-watt while cutting down on overall area. Production is set for the second half of 2022, with the first Intel 4 products planned for 2023 (Meteor Lake for consumer products, and Granite Rapids for data center). • Intel 3, set for manufacturing in the second half of 2023, is the new name for what would have been a second-generation 7nm product under Intel’s previous naming scheme. Like Intel 4, it’s still a FinFET product, although Intel says it’ll offer additional optimizations and use of EUV for roughly an 18 percent increase in performance-per-watt compared to Intel 4. No release date or product names for Intel 3 chips have been announced yet, but presumably, they won’t be available until 2024. Intel 20A is the name for the next generation of Intel technologies that, under the old scheme, would have been the architecture following the formerly branded 7nm node. It’s also the most substantial announcement that Intel made today, technologically speaking, one that will see Intel debut its first new transistor architecture since FinFET in 2011, called “RibbonFET.” The new architecture will mark Intel’s first gate-all-around transistor, a fundamentally new transistor technology for the company that promises greater transistor density and smaller sizes. Additionally, 20A will see the introduction of “PowerVia,” a new technology that allows for wafers to be powered from the back of the chip, instead of requiring power to be rounded to the front. A closer look at the coming updates for Intel 20A. Image: Intel The “20A” in the title is meant to evoke the “Ångstrom era” of semiconductor design — an Ångstrom being a unit of measurement smaller than nanometer. (20Å = 2nm, although, like the other rebranded Intel names above, Intel 20A doesn’t refer to a specific measurement on the products themselves.) Intel’s 20A isn’t expected to ramp until 2024, and, like Intel 3, it doesn’t have any formally announced release date or products yet. Intel 18A is the farthest in the future piece of Intel’s roadmap and will feature the second generation of Intel’s RibbotFET technology for “another major jump in transistor performance.” Intel says that Intel 18A is in development for “early 2025,” and that it expects this generation of technology to re-establish its semiconductor leadership. In addition to all of its process roadmap news, Intel also announced two major updates to its Foveros chip-stacking packaging technologies (the second-generation of which is set to debut in Intel 4’s Meteor Lake in 2023.) Foveros chip stacking combines several hardware elements into a single die, like Intel’s Lakefield chips, which pile together five CPU cores, an integrated GPU, and DRAM into a compact stack to save internal space compared to a traditional design. Image: Intel Foveros Omni will allow for more variety in stacked chips by making it easier to mix-and-match tiles, regardless of their specific size — for example, allowing for a base tile that’s smaller than the top tile in a stack. And Foveros Direct will allow for direct copper-to-copper bonding between components, reducing resistance and decreasing bump pitches. Both of the new Foveros technologies are planned for production in 2023. Intel’s new names may help the company recontextualize its current and future products more accurately against its competition, but the fact remains that Intel is behind. Even accepting that the Intel 7 is on par with 7nm products from other foundries, those foundries are already past their 7nm chips and on to 5nm hardware. Which means that the companies that rely on those external foundries — like Apple, AMD, Nvidia, Qualcomm, and virtually every other major tech company — can still get chips that are more advanced than Intel’s best work. Apple’s superlative M1 Macs, for example, already use 5nm chips from TSMC — and handily outpace Intel’s comparable products. AMD is rumored to be working on 5nm Zen 4 processors for as early as 2022, too, which could offer similarly concerning competition for Intel from its already encroaching competitor. Even with the ambitious, annual cadence for its roadmap, Intel is playing from behind; it doesn’t expect to fully catch up to the rest of the industry until Intel 20A in 2024. And it doesn’t expect to reclaim leadership in the semiconductor business until 2025 with Intel 18A. And all that assumes that Intel doesn’t hit any more delays or manufacturing snags like the ones that held up both its 10nm and 7nm processes (which arguably put the company in its current situation in the first place). After years of setbacks, though, it’s clear that the revitalized Intel isn’t going down without a fight. But the next few years will see whether its efforts are enough. Intel has a new architecture roadmap and a plan to retake its chipmaking crown in 2025
  3. Intel warns of CPU stock shortages in near future Intel CFO says to expect ‘acute’ supply problems in Q3 Intel has warned that we are entering a period where the supply of its processors for consumers is going to become thin on the ground, so unfortunately, we can expect trouble ahead on the stock front. In fact, Intel’s chief financial officer, George Davis, has said there will be ‘acute’ supply problems in Q3 (from now through to September), following CEO Pat Gelsinger’s recent observation that the global chip shortage is likely to continue for one or two years, so perhaps until 2023. Davis said on an earnings call (as transcribed by Seeking Alpha😞 “Persistent industry-wide component and substrate shortages are expected to lower CCG (Client Computing Group) revenues sequentially. We expect supply shortages to continue for several quarters but appear to be particularly acute for clients in Q3. In data center, we expect enterprise, government and cloud to show further recovery in Q3.” Heavyweight priorities Intel is prioritizing the production of heavyweight processors for the likes of data center use because that’s where the big profits lie (and also due to contracts the chip giant is bound by). Of course, if you only have a certain amount of production capacity, it makes sense to produce the biggest earning CPUs with the beefiest premium. Indeed, we’ve seen this before when Intel has struggled with supply issues, with the firm sacrificing lower-end processors to produce high-end Core models and server chips. The central issue here is a problem with substrate (the base layer of the chip) supply, and as Tom’s Hardware, which picked up on this, points out, the specific issue is with insufficient Ajinomoto ABF substrates. Lacking these, Intel is constrained in terms of the amount of CPUs it can actually make, and while the company has made moves to work on self-sufficiency – finishing production of ABF substrates in-house, and also investing in ABF substrate makers – these efforts won’t have an impact to mitigate shortages until later in the year. Davis said: “We did a really good job of eating up a lot of our substrates, some of which we thought we would have available to us in Q3. He added: “In Q3, we could see we had a real supply challenge, it is acute. But Q4, we are doing everything we can to help our substrate suppliers increase supply, including finishing up some of their manufacturing in our own facilities, which is something we could do with as an IDM [integrated device manufacturer].” Analysis While stock shortages are hardly anything new these days, and we’ve previously been told that component supply issues aren’t going away anytime soon – despite some glimmers of hope regarding GPUs – this latest admission from Intel is certainly disappointing. More to the point, the production issues for Q3 being referred to as ‘acute’ and rather serious sounding is an ominous note for those looking to pick up an Intel chip in the near future. Furthermore, remember that Intel is preparing to launch its next-gen Alder Lake CPUs later in 2021. Given the increasing amount of leakage around Alder Lake, and the fact that sample chips are reportedly already being slyly sold over in China, it seems like the 12th-gen processors are on target for a rumored October launch. That’s Q4, of course, where Intel expects matters to pick up a little from Q3, but if Alder Lake turns out to be as promising as the grapevine reckons, it’ll likely be in serious demand. And given what we’re hearing here, it’s not difficult to imagine another situation where CPU stock becomes a struggle to find with new models, and scalpers then getting involved with the usual results and spiralling prices. Intel warns of CPU stock shortages in near future
  4. Intel says its 10nm production is now exceeding 14nm wafers Intel reported its second-quarter (Q2) 2021 financial results last night. Revenue-wise, Team Blue hasn't seen much change in its situation compared to last year's Q2 results. Worrying for Intel is the fact that its data center group (DCG) revenue has been reduced by 9%, probably due to the excellent performance offered by AMD's EPYC server CPUs. The non-GAAP earnings per share overall though have improved by 12%. For those interested, you can find the full earnings report here. Aside from that, the company also had some positive news to share regarding its long-delayed 10nm FinFET process. Pat Gelsinger, the new CEO of Intel has stated the company is "now manufacturing more 10-nanometer wafers than 14-nanometer". Here's his full statement from a call transcript (via Seeking Alpha😞 Under IDM 2.0, our factory network continues to deliver and we are now manufacturing more 10-nanometer wafers than 14-nanometer. As 10-nanometer volumes ramp, economics are improving with 10-nanometer wafer cost 45% lower year-over-year with more to come. A few years back, Intel had been pretty confident about its 10nm process often touting its advantages against competitors' nodes as well as its own previous processes. The company originally hoped to launch the first 10nm-based chip in the form of the Cannon Lake family of processors back in 2015-16. Evidently, that didn't happen and the company was forced to revise its famous "Tick-Tock" cycle to the 'Process-Architecture-Optimization' (PAO). The company finally launched its first 10nm processor with the hybrid Lakefield design which was for mobile. Desktop users are yet to get a taste of Intel's 10nm process but thanks to the improving yields of the node, we would likely see that soon on this form factor too starting with Alder Lake-S. Intel says its 10nm production is now exceeding 14nm wafers
  5. Intel teases plan to speed up chip advancements More news is coming on July 26th Intel has struggled recently with getting its more advanced chip architectures out the door, but that might be changing soon. CEO Pat Gelsinger announced today on Intel’s Q2 earnings call that “7nm is progressing well,” and the company is gearing up to announce news on how its “accelerating its annual cadence of innovation with new advancements in semiconductor process and packaging,” at a webcast on Monday, July 26th. The announcement comes alongside Intel’s Q2 earnings, where the semiconductor company managed to beat expectations and bring in $18.2 billion in revenue, up 2 percent year-over-year. Intel is feeling pretty optimistic about the future, too. It raised its 2021 outlook by an additional $1 billion to $73.5 billion, and now expects to achieve revenue growth year-over-year compared to 2020. Intel’s earnings have been trending upwards for the past several quarters, despite its frequent delays and misses on production of both its 10nm and 7nm chips. That growth has been buoyed by spikes in demand for both personal computers and data-center chips in 2020 due to the COVID-19 pandemic, which saw millions buy new laptops and computers to aid in remote work and education and an increased reliance on cloud services. And Intel seems to still be riding that wave, recording $10.1 billion in revenue for its client computing group (up 6 percent year over year, and a Q2 record for the company), despite the global semiconductor shortage. Gelsinger commented during the call that he “expect(s) the shortages to bottom out in the second half [of the year, but] it will take another one to two years before the industry is able to completely catch up with demand.” The boost for the client computing group also helped Intel make up for slower revenue from its data center group, which was down 9 percent year-over-year with $6.5 billion in revenue. There’s signs that that the impressive growth for the PC segment is starting to slow, however: both IDC and Gartner noted that growth of PC sales has slowed down considerably in Q2, which could indicate that the boost in sales there will diminish in the coming months. The past year has been a tumultuous one for Intel. Last summer, the company was forced to admit that it would be severely delaying its upcoming 7nm architecture for its next generation of processors. That news was followed by the departure of the company’s hardware chief, Dr. Venkata (Murthy) Renduchintala, and the replacement of CEO Bob Swan with Pat Gelsinger (a former chief technology office and hardware engineer at the company) in an attempt to right the ship. Gelsinger has wasted no time in trying to establish changes to get Intel back on track, announcing a new “IDM 2.0” initiative in March that aims to see Intel return as an industry leader in chip manufacturing. As part of that plan, the company will be outsourcing production for “products at the core of Intel’s computing offerings” to competitors like TSMC and Samsung starting in 2023. Intel is also working to launch a new branch of its business, Intel Foundry Services, which will see the company take on manufacturing projects for third-party companies, including a $20 billion investment in expanding its manufacturing facilities in Arizona. Given the overwhelming demand for more chip making companies in light of the global semiconductor shortage, Intel Foundry Services could be a big win for the company down the line. Intel announced today that it has over 100 potential customers interested in the service, and promised more news on Monday about the new initiative, but it’ll still be some time before that business ramps up. Intel teases plan to speed up chip advancements
  6. Intel's Alder Lake may not be arriving until next year, according to leaked roadmap Back in April, an alleged Intel roadmap had leaked, according to which the company appeared to be planning the upcoming 12th gen Alder Lake-S desktop launch for mid-Q3 or Q4 of this year. This may still be true, but a new roadmap has leaked today that's dated back to January, containing information on Alder Lake vPro parts. According to it, Intel's Alder Lake platforms - both the desktop-based Alder Lake-S as well as the mobile Alder Lake-P -, might not be arriving before Q1 of 2022. Unfortunately, we have no way of knowing which one of the leaked roadmaps is the latest. In general, companies delay product launches and rarely expedite them. In this time of global chip shortage, the former seems more likely. Then again, Intel has been struggling against AMD's Ryzen offerings in the desktop segment and would want to get its processors out as early as possible. There are hints that Alder Lake - at least on desktops - is probably not too far away, considering we already have compatible DDR5 memory out, as well as spares of socket LGA 1700 selling online. And vPro parts do normally tend to be launched close to the general SKUs. Moving on from there, we are also greeted today with purported new information regarding Alder Lake mobile platform. There is the mention of Alder Lake-M, as well as all-new H55 parts that now raise the TDP level of the chips beyond 45W. We were already aware of Alder Lake going up to 14 cores and 20 threads (14C/20T), comprising six large Golden Cove cores and eight Gracemont cores for a (6+8) layout. However, the apparent new H55 parts will rival that of desktop SKUs with a 16C/24T configuration. The integrated graphics in these chips appear to be cut down significantly compared to the 14C/20T Alder Lake-P parts. It is alleged that there will only be 32 graphics Executions Units (EUs) in H55 SKUs, compared to 96 EUs on Alder Lake-P. Lastly, there is a slide relating to the Windows support for Alder Lake platforms, according to which the 12th gen Intel processors are supported by Windows 10 version 20H2 and newer. Source and images: VideoCardz Intel's Alder Lake may not be arriving until next year, according to leaked roadmap
  7. Intel is reportedly in talks to buy the $30 billion foundry company AMD spun off a decade ago Intel isn’t saying either way In 2008, chipmakers Intel and AMD took two distinct paths: Intel kept manufacturing its own chips to maintain full control, while AMD decided to spin off its semiconductor business as GlobalFoundries, relying on it and other manufacturers to provide the actual silicon. Now, The Wall Street Journal is reporting that Intel is looking to snap up AMD’s former fabs as well, in a deal that could value them at $30 billion. It’s clear from the WSJ story that the deal isn’t a sure thing, and GlobalFoundries outright denied that it was in talks with Intel. But it’s possible Intel’s negotiating with the investment firm that owns GlobalFoundries instead, as the WSJ points out. It’s also intriguing that the Journal doesn’t have a “no comment” from Intel itself — that’s sometimes a canary to indicate a company did comment, just off the record or on deep background. (“We will decline to comment on rumor and speculation,” an Intel spokesperson told The Verge, though.) There’s an obvious reason why Intel might want GlobalFoundries — it’s actually ramping up its foundry business now. In an attempt to turn around the struggling company, new Intel CEO Pat Gelsinger announced in March that the company would no longer go it alone, outsourcing more of its chip production to third-party foundries, agreeing to produce more chips for other companies using its own foundries, and also investing in new fabs itself. That included a $20 billion investment in new facilities in Arizona, but it could take many years for new buildings to get constructed and ramp up. Meanwhile, it sounds like the #4 foundry in the world (according to TrendForce) may be up for grabs, one that accounts for 7 percent of all foundry business by revenue. That won’t put Intel on the same footing as a giant TSMC or Samsung (which together account for an estimated 74 percent), but it’d be a start. The Washington Post took a tour of GlobalFoundries’ facility in Malta, NY just last week, if you’d like to hear what it’s like. Intel is reportedly in talks to buy the $30 billion foundry company AMD spun off a decade ago
  8. Intel's latest graphics driver brings Windows 11 support, optimizes F1 2021, and more Intel quietly released its latest DCH graphics driver version 30.0.100.9684 yesterday. The new update is significant as it adds support for the shiny new Windows 11 OS, which is available now as an Insider Preview. Since this is a Windows 11 compatible driver, it is WDDM 3.0-compliant and also brings support for HLSL Shader Model 6.6. The driver also features DirectML enhancements and optimizations, and is compatible with Windows Subsystem for Linux (WSL). Alongside that, the driver brings game optimizations, this time for EA's racing sim F1 2021. The update also fixes problems with stuttering and reduces load times on MMORPG Moonlight Blade and popular shooter Call of Duty: Warzone. In terms of feature addition, the driver adds Microsoft's Auto HDR support on Iris Plus graphics on 10th gen processors. A detailed list of all the bug fixes has been provided below: Intel® Iris® Xe MAX graphics: Minor graphic anomalies seen in Fortnite*, Balan: Wonderworld*. Intel® Iris® Xe MAX graphics: Intermittent crash or hang seen in Assassin’s Creed Valhalla* (DX12), Marvel’s Avengers* (DX12). Blank Display observed with 5120x2160 resolution at 50Hz setting. Intermittent crash or hang seen in Shadowman Remastered*(Vulkan), Dark Souls III*, Gangstar New Orleans*, Wolfenstein II: The New Colossus* (Vulkan), World of Tanks* (DX12). Minor graphic anomalies seen in Dirt 5* (DX12), Watch Dogs: Legion* (DX12), Control* (DX12), Far Cry: New Dawn* (when starting from a saved file), 3DMark: FireStrike*. HDMI 2.0 monitor cannot light up after resume from sleep or standby. Display abnormal when 4K monitor connected and switched to duplicate displays. Visual anomalies seen on internal panel during .wmv movie playback in Movies & TV app under high CPU usage on 11th Generation Intel® Core™ H-Series mobile Processors. There are also several problems that remain unresolved: Intermittent crash or hang may be seen in Burnout Paradise Remastered*, Call of Duty: Black Ops Cold War* (DX12), Detroit: Become Human* (Vulkan), Doom Eternal* (Vulkan), Metro Exodus* (DX12) when changing graphics settings, Moonlight Blade* (DX12), Necromunda: Hired gun* (DX12) (when choosing Shadow option other than low), Need for Speed Payback*, NBA 2K21* (DX12) (when switching resolution from 1920 x 1080 to 1600 x 900 and 1280 x 720), Red Dead Redemption 2* (DX12) while running benchmark, Redout: Enhanced Edition*, Resident Evil Village* (DX12), Scarlet Nexus*, Shadow of the Tomb Raider* (after switching to DX12 and SMAA 4x and playing for 10 minutes), Spyro: Reignited Trilogy*, The Dark Pictures: Man of Medan* (in online mode), Tom Clancy’s Ghost Recon Breakpoint*, War Thunder*. Minor graphic anomalies may be observed in Adobe Premiere Pro 2020* while playing video, Assassin’s Creed Valhalla* (DX12), Crysis Remastered, Cyberpunk 2077* (DX12), Dark Souls 3, Death Stranding* (DX12), Deus Ex Mankind Divided* (DX12), Doom Eternal* (Vulkan) (in-game menu), Elex*, Forza Horizon 4* (DX12), Gears of War Ultimate Edition* (DX12), Hitman 2* (DX12), Horizon Zero Dawn* (DX12), Just Cause 4*, Microsoft Flight Simulator*, Minecraft VR* (DX12 when launched with audio enabled), Monster Jam Steel Titans 2*, Red Dead Redemption 2* (DX12), Shadow of the Tomb Raider* (DX12), Starcraft 2*, Tom Clancy’s Rainbow Six Siege* (Vulkan), 3DMark Fire Strike*. Intel® Iris® Xe MAX graphics: Intermittent crash or hang may be seen in Rage 2* (Vulkan) (when entering main menu), Sid Meier’s Civilization VI* (during ALT + ENTER), SMITE*, The Witcher 3*, Warframe* (DX12). Intel® Iris® Xe MAX graphics: Minor graphic anomalies may be observed in Call of Duty: Modern Warfare* (DX12), Forza Motorsport 6* (DX12), GRID 2019* (DX12), Marvel’s Avengers (DX12), Metro Exodus* (DX12), Rocket League* (when CMAA Enabled), Serious Sam 4* (Vulkan). As usual, the new driver is compatible with all Intel integrated as well as dedicated graphics starting from the 6th gen Core processors onwards. The 500 series Pentium and Celeron processors are also supported. In terms of OS support, all Windows versions starting from version 1809 and newer are supported. To download the new 30.0.100.9684 driver, head over to Intel's official support page here where you can opt for either the .exe or the .zip version of the driver package. Intel's latest graphics driver brings Windows 11 support, optimizes F1 2021, and more
  9. 16C/24T Intel Core i9-12900K Alder Lake-S reportedly batters the 16C/32T Ryzen 9 5950X Intel's 12th gen 'Alder Lake-S' desktop processor lineup is expected to launch later this year in Q3 or Q4. The market is already bustling with activity in anticipation of the launch with the first compatible DDR5 RAM kit already being available and spare parts of the LGA 1700 socket also selling online. LGA 1700 spares Of course, it is likely that Alder Lake-S parts are currently being tested internally and if rumors are to be believed, then one such performance score has leaked which shows the upcoming flagship Alder Lake-S CPU, allegedly named Core i9-12900K, outperforming the Ryzen 9 5950X in Cinebench R20. The Core i9-12900K is thought to be a 16 core, 24 thread (16C/24T) part where eight of the cores are based on the bigger Sunny Cove architecture while the remaining eight cores are smaller Gracemont cores (8+8). Only the Sunny Cove cores are hyper-threaded which leads to the bizarre 16C/24T layout. The processor tested here is apparently a qualification sample (QS) part which means the final retail part won't be too different. The bigger Sunny Cove core was purportedly able to turbo up to 5.3GHz on a single thread while the smaller Gracemont cores were able to reach 3.9GHz. The i9-12900K allegedly has scored ~11,300 points in the Cinebench R20 multi-core test while we know the 16C/32T Ryzen 9 5950X generally gets in the ballpark of 10,000 points in this rendering benchmark. It has also been added that in the same test, the Core i7-12700K with an (8+4) configuration - an alleged 12C/20T processor - reportedly scores 9,500+ points. The Core i5 part, a 12600K with a (6+4) configuration or 10C/16T, has purportedly achieved 7,400+ points. Do bear in mind though that the information comes from an unofficial source and it's advised to take these with a small pinch of salt. Source: NGA forum 16C/24T Intel Core i9-12900K Alder Lake-S reportedly batters the 16C/32T Ryzen 9 5950X
  10. Detailed specifications of Alder Lake-S Core i9-12900K and more SKUs reportedly leak The alleged specifications of the upcoming Intel 12th gen desktop processors dubbed Alder Lake-S have leaked today, courtesy of '我用第三人称', a user on the Chinese Q&A website Zhihu. The new leak expands on some of the details we came to know earlier where the upcoming Alder Lake-S flagship 16-core, 24-thread (16C/24T) Core i9-12900K was outscoring the current AMD mainstream flagship Ryzen 9 5950X in the Cinebench R20 multi-core test. For example, in the earlier report, it was mentioned that the i9-12900K is able to turbo up to 5.3GHz on a single thread on the larger Golden Cove cores. This has been slightly altered in today's leak which now mentions this speed is applicable to a couple of cores/threads. So while we are only speculating, it might be possible that the single-core turbo goes even higher. The all-core turbo has been stated to be 5GHz. For those unaware, the Core i9-12900K is rumored to feature eight "Bigger" Golden Cove cores and eight "Big" Gracemont cores for an (8+8) configuration. Note here that the larger Golden Cove cores have been indicated by "P-Core" likely standing for 'performance core'. On the other hand, the "E-core" probably means 'efficiency core' and that's indicating the smaller Gracemont cores. Specifications of some of the other purported Alder Lake-S SKUs, namely the 12C/20T Core i7-12700K (8+4) and the 10C/16T Core i5-12600K (6+4), have also been provided. Thanks to the addition of the smaller Gracemont cores, it seems Intel has been able to reduce the boost TDP (PL2) of the Alder Lake-S parts from 250W in Rocket Lake-S down to 228W. Source and image: 我用第三人称 (Zhihu) Detailed specifications of Alder Lake-S Core i9-12900K and more SKUs reportedly leak
  11. Intel discontinues Lakefield processors which featured 3D packaging technology Back in 2019, Intel first revealed Lakefield mobile processor which combines a hybrid CPU with Intel’s Foveros 3D packaging technology allowing OEMs like Microsoft to design new thin-and-light form factors. In fact, Microsoft announced Surface Neo based on this processor. This new processor is built on latest 10nm process and Foveros advanced packaging technology, so it achieves a significant reduction in standby power, core area (12x12x1 mm) and package height when compared to previous generations of technology. Samsung Galaxy Book S was the first device that came to market with this new hybrid processor from Intel. Later, Lenovo released ThinkPad X1 Fold, the world’s first foldable PC, based on this processor. Intel has now announced that it is discontinuing Intel Core processors with Intel Hybrid Technology (official name of Lakefield processors). Here’s why Intel is discontinuing Lakefield processors: Market demand for the products have shifted to other Intel products. If Microsoft decides to bring back Surface Neo in the future, it must look for an equivalent processor in the ARM ecosystem. Source: Intel Intel discontinues Lakefield processors which featured 3D packaging technology
  12. The Intel® Extreme Tuning Utility (Intel® XTU) is a software application that allows you to fine-tune the settings of your K- or X-SKU processor. Using its various frequency, voltage, and other controls, you can fully customize your configuration in terms of power consumption and computing performance. Intel XTU is available for download at the Intel® Download Center and can be loaded on any Intel® system with a 2nd generation or newer Intel® Core™ processor and a chipset that supports overclocking. In a joint effort between Intel and HWBOT, we present version 5.1, a fully integrated overclocking software application that allows you to analyze your own configuration, share and find overclock settings from users around the world, and hype your own achievements through social media. Intel XTU and the HWBOT integration aim to facilitate overclocking for beginners and novice users as well as give the advanced overclocking community and its power users a platform to show their overclocking skills and knowledge. Features System Information – Inspect processor, memory, graphics, BIOS, operating system, and motherboard information. Basic Tuning – Simple three-step process: benchmark your starting performance, overclock your processor, and measure your new performance and witness the performance unleashed! Advanced Tuning – If you are an experienced overclocker, we give you all the controls to maximize the untapped performance of your processor, memory, and graphics hardware. Stress Test – Interested in how stable your overclock is? The included stress tests help you test your system to be sure. Benchmarking – Would you like to see how your setup compares? With Intel® XTU, you can benchmark your system and then compare your scores online with HWBOT.org. Application and Profile Pairing – Have you optimized your overclock for a specific application? Use the app-profile pairing feature to apply different overclocking settings to separate applications. Supported OS: Windows 7*, Windows 8*, Windows 8.1*, Windows® 10, 32-bit, Windows® 10, 64-bit Homepage: https://downloadcenter.intel.com/download/29183/Intel-Extreme-Tuning-Utility-Intel-XTU- Release Notes: https://downloadmirror.intel.com/29183/eng/XTU-7.4.1.3-ReleaseNotes.pdf Download[With EULA]: https://downloadcenter.intel.com/downloads/eula/29183/Intel-Extreme-Tuning-Utility-Intel-XTU-?httpDown=https%3A%2F%2Fdownloadmirror.intel.com%2F29183%2Feng%2FXTUSetup.exe Download[Without EULA]: https://downloadmirror.intel.com/29183/eng/XTUSetup.exe MD5: 1cbc6c2084ba8ab1d8d4e401e62c684a This download is valid for the product(s) listed below:
  13. Intel's Speed Select Technology ironically hurting performance, but a fix is coming Intel's Speed Select Technology (SST) is a power management solution from the company that allows users to manage core prioritization and frequency regulation depending on the workloads in order to improve performance and efficiency. However, as an Intel engineer has observed, there is performance regression by more than 10% in benchmarks with the mode enabled. And while it isn't stated, the impact in a real workload might be lower but it's still a cause for concern. The engineer further explains that the standard Linux PCI interface which is used here is causing the delay as it searches through hundreds of PCI devices, during mapping, that are attached to the system. For those wondering why the need to mention hundreds of devices here, that's because Intel SST is a complex solution and is only available in Xeons and not in the mainstream Core lineup. Since the root cause of the problem has been identified, the good news is that a patch that promises to fix this should be available soon via a future firmware if it isn't already out. The fix is a fairly simple one and will use the cached data that will speed up the search process. Here's what the full LKML message says: It was observed that some of the high performance benchmarks are spending more time in kernel depending on which CPU package they are executing. The difference is significant and benchmark scores varies more than 10%. These benchmarks adjust class of service to improve thread performance which run in parallel. This class of service change causes access to MMIO region of Intel Speed Select PCI devices depending on the CPU package they are executing. This mapping from CPU to PCI device instance uses a standard Linux PCI interface "pci_get_domain_bus_and_slot()". This function does a linear search to get to a PCI device. Since these platforms have 100+ PCI devices, this search can be expensive in fast path for benchmarks. Since the device and function of PCI device is fixed for Intel Speed Select PCI devices, the CPU to PCI device information can be cached at the same time when bus number for the CPU is read. In this way during runtime the cached information can be used. This improves performance of these benchmarks significantly. Intel launched SST back in 2019 inside Cascade Lake Xeon CPUs. The technology is quite versatile as it enables several options like setting core prioritization, base clock tweaking, and more. As stated above, SST is implemented in the firmware and carried out by the processor's Power Control Unit (PCU). For more information on SST, visit Intel's official site here. Intel's Speed Select Technology ironically hurting performance, but a fix is coming
  14. Intel announces its first 5G M.2 modem for laptops Ahead of this year's virtual Computex event, Intel has announced the first 5G product to come from its partnership with MediaTek, which it announced in late 2019. The Intel 5G Solution 5000 is an M.2 5G system for laptops, which allows OEMs to more easily come up with 5G designs, using a standardized interface. The Intel 5G Solution 5000 comes with support for sub-6GHz 5G, and there's no mmWave support. It can also connect to 4G LTE and 3G WCDMA. The product has been carrier certified in most major regions around the world, so laptops that adopt this solution can be sold in most markets. It's also supported by Windows, Chrome OS, and Linux. MediaTek had begun sampling the first Intel 5G solution, based on the T700 modem, last summer, and the two companies also worked with Fibocom, which helped with carrier certification and regulatory support. Fibocom also handles manufacturing, sales, and distribution of the 5G M.2 modules. Of course, while using the M.2 format reduces some of the complexity of implementing 5G in a laptop, it's not as simple as inserting this solution in an M.2 slot on any laptop. The devices still need antennas for cellular reception. Despite its early announcement of the collaboration with MediaTek all the way back in 2019, Intel ended up being sucker-punched by Qualcomm, which announced its own 5G M.2 reference designs about a week ago, based on the Snapdragon X62 and X65 modems. The first designs with Intel's 5G Solution 5000 will be available this year with manufacturers such as Acer, ASUS, and HP among the first to use in their designs. Next year, we should see over 30 designs that include the solution. Intel announces its first 5G M.2 modem for laptops
  15. Intel launches the first U-series processor capable of 5GHz speeds This year's Computex virtual event officially starts tomorrow, but Intel is getting the ball rolling with a couple of major announcements today. The company is adding two new processors to its Tiger lake family, specifically in the U-series range, meant for thin-and-light laptops. First and foremost, there's the new Intel Core i7-1195G7, which is Intel's first U-series processor capable of boosting all the way up to 5GHz. In fact, it's the industry's first 5GHz CPU for thin-and-light laptops, according to Intel. We've seen Intel gradually push more of its processors to 5GHz, starting with its first 5GHz desktop CPU in 2018, and laptops got their first 5GHz CPU in 2019 with the Core i9-9980HK. Naturally, this is a single-core boost clock with Intel Turbo Boost Max technology, but the maximum all-core turbo is 4.6GHz, which is still impressive. Meanwhile, the integrated Iris Xe GPU can also boost slightly higher, at up to 1.4GHz. Gallery: Core i7-1195G7 vs Ryzen 7 5800U As you can see above, Intel compared the Core i7-1195G7 to AMD's Ryzen 7 5800U in both gaming and content creation, showing off higher performance across the board. The other new CPU is the Core i5-1155G7, which is now the fastest U-series Core i5 model. It can boost up to 4.5GHz on a single CPU core or 4.3GHz on all cores, and the GPU can boost up to 1.35GHz. You can see what Intel's lineup looks like with these new additions in the table below: In addition to the higher performance of the CPUs themselves, Intel says it aims to accelerate the adoption of designs with Wi-Fi 6/6E with these additional options. We should see over 60 new consumer PC designs based on these two processors by this holiday season, and the first laptops with them should be coming from Acer, ASUS, Lenovo, and MSI this summer. Intel launches the first U-series processor capable of 5GHz speeds
  16. Intel announces new SSD that combines Optane Memory and NAND flash Intel has announced the latest iteration of its Optane Memory sticks for laptops, the Optane Memory H20 with Solid State Storage. If the name doesn't give it away, it's exactly what it sounds like - a storage drive that combines Intel's Optane Memory technology with a traditional QLC SSD, offering higher capacities and speeds in a more compact form factor. Optane Memory is a proprietary Intel technology that's designed to improve performance in applications, specifically when running them from slower storage devices, and it sits somewhere between RAM and traditional storage in terms of speed. However, Optane Memory sticks are typically sold in an M.2 form factor by themselves, and they only come in small sizes such as 16GB or 32GB, meaning you'll almost always need two M.2 slots on your machine. The Optane Memory H20 with Solid State Storage includes both the Optane Memory chip and NAND flash on a single M.2 2280 card, meaning you get both the benefits of Optane and the higher capacity of a typical SSD while only using one M.2 slot. It comes with 32GB of Intel Optane Memory and either 512GB or 1TB of QLC SSD 3D NAND storage, and it promises read and write speeds up to 3,300MB/s and 2,100MB/s, respectively. It's still using the older PCIe 3.0 interface, so its maximum speeds aren't quite as high as they could be, but that's not to say they're slow either. They also promise latency of just 6.75µs on average for reads, and 12µs for writes. As for durability, Intel touts 1.6 million hours of mean time between failures, and up to 185TB written for the 512GB SSD model and 370TB written for the 1TB version. If you're hoping to buy one of these, you can't, at least not directly. Intel will be making these available to OEMs to use in laptops, all-in-ones, and mini PCs starting June 20. This makes sense since those are the devices where saving space is usually more important to achieve thinner or lighter designs. Source: Intel announces new SSD that combines Optane Memory and NAND flash
  17. Intel wants ATX12VO standard to be more popular with cheap Alder Lake-S motherboards Some Alder Lake-S motherboards with ATX12VO standard? Intel expects broader support of a new power-efficient ATX12VO standard with Alder Lake-S, but neither motherboard nor power supply manufacturers are eager to participate. ATX12VO connector vs 24pin on ASRock Z490 Phantom Gaming 4SR motherboard, Source: Linus Tech Tips The “Single Rail Power Supply Desktop Platform Form Factor ATX12VO” power standard is meant to increase the power efficiency of regular desktop power supplies. Some independent tests have shown that it can be so power-efficient that it reduces the power by half, but only when the system is idle. The ATX12VO standard does not quite offer the same power efficiency gains with the system under heavy load. The new standard requires a motherboard with a new 10-pin power connector as well as a compatible power supply. The latter is not to feature any other power rails than 12V, which means voltages lower or higher than 12V would have to be directly converted by the motherboard itself, rather than the power supply. This increases the complexity of the motherboard. We received an anonymous tip with a short overview of the status of the ATX12VO standard on Alder Lake-S motherboards. It outlines the process of ATX12VO adoption by motherboard and power supply makers. It confirms that if any entity is to offer ATX12VO compatible devices in time Alder Lake-S arrives, they would have to be working OEM and ODMs by the end of this month. This implies that September might indeed be the very last moment that such devices should be fully ready for the market. ATX12VO standard on 600-series motherboard, Source: VideoCardz We have reached out to our sources at motherboard vendors who have confirmed that Intel is indeed interested in ATX12VO becoming a more popular standard, but right now there is strong opposition from motherboard makers as well as power supply manufacturers. Most high-end gaming boards for Alder Lake are unlikely to feature ATX12VO standards. We might however see a lot more entry-level motherboards for system integrators and pre-built system suppliers who are interested in offering the best power efficiency to meet strict government power regulations. ATX12VO motherboards, Source: VideoCardz Source and further reading: Linus Tech Tips, HardwareLuxx Source: Intel wants ATX12VO standard to be more popular with cheap Alder Lake-S motherboards
  18. The Intel® Extreme Tuning Utility (Intel® XTU) is a software application that allows you to fine-tune the settings of your K- or X-SKU processor. Using its various frequency, voltage, and other controls, you can fully customize your configuration in terms of power consumption and computing performance. Intel XTU is available for download at the Intel® Download Center and can be loaded on any Intel® system with a 2nd generation or newer Intel® Core™ processor and a chipset that supports overclocking. In a joint effort between Intel and HWBOT, we present version 5.1, a fully integrated overclocking software application that allows you to analyze your own configuration, share and find overclock settings from users around the world, and hype your own achievements through social media. Intel XTU and the HWBOT integration aim to facilitate overclocking for beginners and novice users as well as give the advanced overclocking community and its power users a platform to show their overclocking skills and knowledge. Features System Information – Inspect processor, memory, graphics, BIOS, operating system, and motherboard information. Basic Tuning – Simple three-step process: benchmark your starting performance, overclock your processor, and measure your new performance and witness the performance unleashed! Advanced Tuning – If you are an experienced overclocker, we give you all the controls to maximize the untapped performance of your processor, memory, and graphics hardware. Stress Test – Interested in how stable your overclock is? The included stress tests help you test your system to be sure. Benchmarking – Would you like to see how your setup compares? With Intel® XTU, you can benchmark your system and then compare your scores online with HWBOT.org. Application and Profile Pairing – Have you optimized your overclock for a specific application? Use the app-profile pairing feature to apply different overclocking settings to separate applications. Supported OS: Windows 7*, Windows 8*, Windows 8.1*, Windows® 10, 32-bit, Windows® 10, 64-bit Homepage: https://downloadcenter.intel.com/download/29183/Intel-Extreme-Tuning-Utility-Intel-XTU- Release Notes: https://downloadmirror.intel.com/29183/eng/XTU-7.4.0.26-ReleaseNotes.pdf Download[With EULA]: https://downloadcenter.intel.com/downloads/eula/29183/Intel-Extreme-Tuning-Utility-Intel-XTU-?httpDown=https%3A%2F%2Fdownloadmirror.intel.com%2F29183%2Feng%2FXTUSetup.exe Download[Without EULA]: https://downloadmirror.intel.com/29183/eng/XTUSetup.exe MD5: dde34dedd380fabe4104527ab37fc23e This download is valid for the product(s) listed below:
  19. Intel is using machine learning to make GTA V look incredibly, unsettlingly realistic Imagine playing the game inside a photo One of the more impressive aspects of Grand Theft Auto V is how closely the game’s San Andreas approximates real-life Los Angeles and Southern California, but a new machine learning project from Intel Labs called “Enhancing Photorealism Enhancement” might take that realism in a unsettlingly photorealistic direction (via Gizmodo). Putting the game through the processes researchers Stephan R. Richter, Hassan Abu Alhaija, and Vladlen Kolten created produces a surprising result: a visual look that has unmistakable similarities to the kinds of photos you might casually take through the smudged front window of your car. You have to see it in motion to really appreciate it, but the combination of slightly washed-out lighting, smoother pavement, and believably reflective cars just sells the fact you’re looking out at the real street from a real dashboard, even if it’s all virtual. The Intel researchers suggest some of that photorealism comes from the datasets they fed their neural network. The group offers a more in-depth and thorough explanation for how image enhancement actually works in their paper (PDF), but as I understand it, the Cityscapes Dataset that was used — built largely from photographs of German streets — filled in a lot of the detail. It’s dimmer and from a different angle, but it almost captures what I imagine a smoother, more interactive version of scrolling through Google Maps’ Street View could be like. It doesn’t entirely behave like it’s real, but it looks very much like it’s built from real things. The researchers say their enhancements go beyond what other photorealistic conversion processes are capable of by also integrating geometric information from GTA V itself. Those “G-buffers,” as the researchers call them, can include data like the distance between objects in the game and the camera, and the quality of textures, like the glossiness of cars. While you might not see an official “photorealism update” roll out to GTA V tomorrow, you may have already played a game or watched a video that’s benefited from another kind of machine learning — AI upscaling. The process of using machine learning smarts to blow up graphics to higher resolutions doesn’t show up everywhere, but has been featured in Nvidia’s Shield TV and in several different mod projects focused on upgrading the graphics of older games. In those cases a neural network is making predictions to fill in missing pixels of detail from a lower resolution game, movie, or TV show to reach those higher resolutions. Photorealism probably shouldn’t be the only graphical goal for video games to have (artistry aside, it looks kind of creepy), but this Intel Labs project does show there’s probably as much room to grow on the software side of things as there is in the raw GPU power of new consoles and gaming PCs. Source: Intel is using machine learning to make GTA V look incredibly, unsettlingly realistic
  20. Intel says it has solved a key bottleneck in quantum computing The breakthrough could lead to tightly integrated quantum chips. Marieke de Lorijn Intel just took a significant step toward making quantum computing more practical. The company and QuTech say they've demonstrated the first instance of high-fidelity two-qubit control using its Horse Ridge cryogenic control processor. Quantum computers normally run into an interconnect bottleneck by using room-temperature electronics to steer a refrigerated quantum chip — the demo showed that Horse Ridge could achieve the same fidelity (99.99 percent) as those 'hotter' electronics. The two firms also showed that Horse Ridge could control multiple qubits on a single radio frequency line, also known as frequency multiplexing, by using an algorithm (Deutsch-Jonza) that's much more efficient on quantum computers than conventional machines. The breakthrough could lead to processors that integrate the electronics and the quantum chip on the same die. That, in turn, could make it much easier to scale quantum computers and have them tackle more of the calculations that would be difficult or impossible with traditional computing power. Source: Intel says it has solved a key bottleneck in quantum computing
  21. Alleged details on Intel's Xe HP "Arctic Sound" leaked, may fail to live up to the hype Back at Architecture Day 2020, Intel outlined its roadmap (image above) for its Xe (Gen 12) graphics architecture. Among the several variants of the Xe is Xe HP, which will be used to build next-gen Intel server and data center GPUs. Today a report has surfaced (via igor'sLAB) which claims it has the alleged details of those upcoming server GPUs that Intel is designing. It was first leaked in February 2020 (via Digital Trends) that going forward, Arctic Sound, as well as other such high-performance GPUs from Intel, will feature a tile-based design. We learn today from the new igorLAB's report that each such tile will pack up to 512 graphics execution units (EUs). For now, at least, we have the alleged details on two such Arctic Sound SKUs, the first being the Arctic Sound 1T (where the 'T' presumably indicates a tile) and Arctic Sound 2T. The 1T allegedly is a single-slot card and has 384 EUs out of the 512 EUs functioning properly, while the dual-slot 2T variant has 480 EUs in each tile working properly. So the 2T has 960 functioning EUs in total. In December last year, Raja Koduri, the GPU chief at Intel, had announced that his company was already sampling Xe HP to its potential customers. As such, it's possible that the information igorLAB's received today has leaked out from such a source. In his tweet, Koduri had shown the image of a disassembled Xe HP graphics card alongside its forerunner, a Xe LP-based H3C XG310 quad-GPU. Exciting to see these next to each other. Intel's first data center GPU that's in production, between Xe HP GPUs that are sampling to customers. We have ways to go, but an incredible journey so far. 🙏 the incredible team at Intel🙏 2020 is a memorable year for GPU technology pic.twitter.com/2fsJvVeDOK — Raja Koduri (@Rajaontheedge) December 8, 2020 Below is a table detailing the rumored specifications of Arctic Sound alongside 2020's H3C XG310: H3C XG310 Arctic Sound 1T Arctic Sound 2T Execution Units (EUs) 4x 96 EUs 384 EUs 2x 480 EUs Micro-architecture Xe LP Xe HP Xe HP Memory 4x 8GB LPDDR4-4266 16GB HBM2E (2.8G) 2x 16GB HBM2E (2.8G) PCIe bus width PCIe 3.0 x16 PCIe 4.0 x16 PCIe 4.0 x16 TDP 150W 150W 300W Interestingly, the Digital Trends report had actually mentioned up to four tiles but we are only looking at a maximum of two tiles here. In its report, igor'sLAB speculates that Intel may have given up on bigger designs as the current 2T Arctic Sound allegedly already is a 300W product. And for adding another couple of tiles, the TDP is estimated to reach close to 500W. So ultimately Arctic Sound may prove to be not much of an upgrade over the current Xe LP-based H3C XG310 offering unless Xe HP gains enormously per TFLOP and per watt over what Xe LP already offers. Source: Alleged details on Intel's Xe HP "Arctic Sound" leaked, may fail to live up to the hype
  22. Intel's 11th-gen H-series CPUs are finally ready for powerful gaming laptops They're up to 19 percent faster than 10th-gen chips. Intel When Intel announced its first batch of 11th-gen H-series mobile processors at CES, we were a bit surprised. Unlike the typical "H" processors, they weren't meant for the most powerful gaming laptops. Instead, those first CPUs were aimed at ultraportable gaming systems. You know, the sort of machines only meant for basic 1080p performance, which didn't really need more than four CPU cores. Now, Intel is finally ready to show off the 11th-gen H-series chips that could power your next dream gaming notebook. Intel These new CPUs promise up to a 19 percent speed improvement over last-gen hardware, according to Intel. And just like the less powerful H-series lineup (which are dubbed H35 by Intel, due to their lower thermal profile), the new chips are built on the company's 10nm Willow Cove architecture. That allows for faster and more efficient performance than Intel's aging 14nm platform, so the speed jump doesn't come as a huge surprise. Intel Intel claims these H-series processors offer the fastest single-threaded performance of any mobile chip (that's also what it said about the H35 hardware). The top of the heap is the Core i9-11980HK, an eight-core CPU that can reach up to 5GHz across two cores with Intel's Turbo Boost 3.0 technology. It's also capable of reaching 4.5GHz across all of its cores, which should be useful for demanding multithreaded applications like video editing and 3D rendering. The 11980HK is fully unlocked, so you'll be able to overclock it to your heart's content (within the limits of your laptop's case, of course). Compared to last year's Core i9-10980HK, the new chip is up to 21 percent faster in War Thunder. But of course, the improvements depend on the game you're actually playing. It's only five percent faster in Far Cry: New Dawn and six percent faster in Hitman 3. The latter is particularly surprising, since Hitman's intricate maps and physics usually demands more from CPUs. Intel Intel is trying to make a bigger splash with its AMD comparisons: The i9-11980HK is 26 percent faster than the Ryzen 5900HX in Grid 2019, and 21 percent faster in Rainbow Six Siege. Even the less powerful Core i5-11400H makes a strong showing, clocking in 12 percent faster than AMD's Ryzen 9 5900HS in Troy: A Total World Saga: Siege. That i5 occasionally gets overtaken by AMD's hardware — it's 3 percent slower in War Thunder — a sign that Intel may only have a performance lead with its faster i9 chips. Source: Intel's 11th-gen H-series CPUs are finally ready for powerful gaming laptops
  23. AMD is biting at Intel's server market share with its largest gains in over a decade Intel is still holding the fort in mobile and desktop, but Epyc chips are snapping at Xeon's dominance in the datacentre. (Image credit: AMD) The first few months of 2021 have been absolutely massive for AMD and Intel. According to the latest report from Mercury Research, the first three months of 2021 saw the largest yearly increase in shipments of CPUs in a quarter of a century, and second only to the final moments of 2020 in terms of raw volume. You'd be perhaps surprised to learn that Intel has gained a touch in overall x86 market share in Q1 2021, whereas AMD reportedly lost out. There's only a percentage point in it: a 1% gain for Intel and a 1% loss for AMD, though. Far from major gains in either direction. Mercury Research puts that down to an increase in budget chip shipments for Chipzilla, which tallies with other figures out of the tech giant as of late. But where Intel has gained in mobile processor market share, it loses out marginally in desktop. That's where AMD's Ryzen processors are seemingly crushing it, and despite some difficulty sourcing the top-tier chips, such as the Ryzen 9 5950X and Ryzen 9 5900X, AMD is still managing to make gains within the market predisposed to Intel processors for so long. AMD reported massive revenue in its last earnings call, and a shift to more high-end processors with higher average selling prices in Q1 certainly goes a long way to explaining that. But perhaps the biggest win in AMD's eyes is the 1.8% increase in server market share quarter to quarter, and 3.8 percent year on year. That means its Epyc processors are selling supremely well against Intel's Xeon chips, and the market that AMD will be most determined to get more of a footing in. Datacentres are not quite so fickle as us gaming lot, see. While 1.8% may appear marginal, it equates to a helluva lot of server chips. In fact, since Intel's server sales were down, AMD managed its highest single-quarter market share gain since 2006, back in the Opteron days. Clearly it's a good time to be in the business of chipmaking—what with demand soaring to space and showing few signs of slowing. Sadly, however, it's not been great for us gamers as demand sees stock depleted within moments of returning, and often sold on for profit. At least that's mainly graphics cards, and not all CPUs. It's still possible to pick up some of the best CPUs for gaming going. Source: AMD is biting at Intel's server market share with its largest gains in over a decade
  24. Intel's discrete DG2 graphics card is 'right around the corner' Is there room between AMD and Nvidia for another GPU manufacturer? (Image credit: Intel) Intel's discrete graphics card offering, its Xe HPG DG2, could arrive sooner than we all thought. According to a tweet from Pete Brubaker, Game Developer Relations engineer at Intel, the chip giant is looking for a Senior Game Developer Relations Engineer to support DG2, and in that tweet, Brubaker mentions, "DG2 is right around the corner!" Pete Brubaker @pbrubaker Come work with us at Intel! DG2 is right around the corner, it's about to get exciting. 2:55 AM · May 6, 2021 Intel hasn't promised much in the way of a release date for its discrete graphics card, beyond another Tweet from the official Intel Graphics account that its Xe HPG (High-Performance Gaming) can handle ray tracing and that we'll see it in 2021. Exactly how long 'right around the corner' is remains open to debate, but if we were to hazard a guess that would still be autumn 2021 at the earliest. We'd absolutely love to see another manufacturer in the gaming graphics cards arena competing against AMD and Nvidia, but we're well aware that this is not going to be an easy task. It's also not the first time Intel has tried doing so in semi-recent memory, with its ill-fated Larabee concept ultimately faltering. Hopefully, Intel learned a lot from that experience and wants to make sure everything is in place this time around. At the same time, right now seems like a perfect time to launch a new gaming GPU into a market that is so desperate for hardware. As long as DG2 is even vaguely competitive it should find there's an eager market awaiting it. Managing top gaming CPUs and GPUs will be a tough juggling act for Intel, but hopefully, it's in it for the long game, and not just out to make a quick buck. There are no juicy details in the job description itself, other than a preference for some form of graphics programming experience. Intel lays claim to a decent game developer relations team already, but the way Brubaker's initial tweet frames it as relating to DG2 indicates a desire for expansion going forward into this brave new world of discrete Intel graphics cards. Source: Intel's discrete DG2 graphics card is 'right around the corner'
  25. Alleged slides containing all details of Intel's upcoming Tiger Lake-H leak Intel announced its 11th-gen mobile chips from the Tiger Lake family earlier this year at CES. However, back then, the company only unveiled a portion of the full Tiger Lake lineup, an overview of which can be seen in one of today's leaked slides (above) from a new report by HD Tecnologia. The report allegedly has all the leaked slides which are seemingly from the launch presentation of Intel's entire Tiger Lake-H lineup unveil next week. At CES, Intel announced the quad-core Tiger Lake H35 chips that are built for the ultraportable gaming segment and if the image above is to be believed, upcoming Tiger Lake-H chips will further cover a few more device segments, which include: Halo enthusiast, Thin enthusiast, and Essential A slide providing a general overview of the improvements and features in Tiger Lake-H outlines features such as the new Willow Cove microarchitecture, support for PCIe Gen 4, and more: Outside of the quad-core H35 chips previously released, the new report today says that more H-series processors with up to 8 cores are also coming. The biggest difference between these and the previously-announced chips is that they all have more than four cores, so you can probably expect more cooling to be required, thus making for larger devices. The H35 lineup is meant for "ultraportable" gaming. Below is a leaked image that lists all the alleged upcoming Tiger Lake-H SKUs: Interestingly, while the previous-gen flagship Rocket Lake-H CPU, the Core i9-10980HK, was a 45W part, the new Core i9-11980HK Tiger Lake-H chip might offer a TDP of 65W.Intel also mentions a 35W cTDP for the remaining processors, but it's worth keeping in mind that the frequencies listed alongside that TDP are below the base frequencies that are also listed on the table. It's likely that the chips can be configured down to 35W - like how H35 chips can be configured down to 28W - but their default TDP will still be 45W. There is another slide outlining the various features of the Core i9-11980HK in detail: Lastly, a gaming performance comparison has also been provided. Curiously, Intel has seemingly compared its upcoming 6 core Tiger Lake-H Core i5-11400H against the flagship 35W octa-core Ryzen 9 5900HS instead of using the higher end, 35W 8-core i9-11900H. This is probably Intel touting its gaming performance as it apparently matches or beats the Ryzen part with fewer cores. These leaked slides are all denoted with an embargo date of 11th May which is when we expect Tiger Lake-H to launch. Devices sporting these new chips like the Inspiron 16 Plus from Dell or the Galaxy Book Odyssey from Samsung have already been announced. Source and images: HD Tecnologia Source: Alleged slides containing all details of Intel's upcoming Tiger Lake-H leak
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