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  1. Back at its Architecture Day 2021 event, when Intel shared the core design details of its Alder Lake CPU architecture, the firm stated that Windows 11 was optimized in a way to best take advantage of the Alder Lake's Performance Hybrid architecture and the new Thread Director technology that helps Windows 11 task scheduling. Early testing confirmed this was indeed the case, and even first-gen hybrid products like Lakefield benefitted as well. Since then, however, Linux too has taken up the mantle to optimize the hybrid architecture and in August earlier this year, the first major patch was sent in related to asymmetric packing. And it is not just on paper that Linux sounds to be doing a better job since benchmarks sort of confirm that Windows 11 has lost its performance lead over time as more and more optimizations land in the Linux kernel. Not only that, but several gaming performance-related issues had also been bringing down Windows 11 22H2. Microsoft claims it was able to fix these with the latest Windows update. Moving on, a new set of patches has been submitted as RFC (request for comment) by Intel Linux engineer Ricardo Neri is the extension of a previous patchwork sent back in August. These ones too aim to improve the performance of hybrid CPUs like Alder Lake, Raptor Lake, and also upcoming 14th Gen Meteor Lake when running Linux. This time, IPC classes for balancing workloads are being added alongside optimizations to Intel's Thread Director, which should result in overall better task scheduling and performance improvement. Neri has explained: On hybrid processors, the microarchitectural properties of the different types of CPUs cause them to have different instruction-per-cycle (IPC) capabilities. IPC can be higher on some CPUs for advanced instructions [..] The load balancer can discover the use of advanced instructions and prefer CPUs with higher IPC for tasks running those instructions. This patchset introduces the concept of classes of tasks, proposes the interfaces that hardware needs to implement and proposes changes to the load balancer to leverage this extra information in combination with asymmetric packing. The V2 of the above patch, that was released yesterday, brings more additions and further optimizations to to IPCC classing and implements cleanups and reworks. Via: Phoronix Linux gets more Intel hybrid optimization as Microsoft struggles with Windows 11 22H2
  2. Mozilla released another Firefox 106 point release. Firefox 106.0.5 addresses a crash that is affecting devices with Intel Gemini Lake processors. The new update is available already. Firefox should pick it up automatically on most systems. Users who run affected devices may want to install the update immediately to resolve the issue. This can be done by downloading the latest version of the Firefox web browser from the Mozilla website or, if Firefox starts on the device, via Menu > Help > About Firefox. The official release notes list a single issue that is fixed in Firefox 106.0.5: Addresses a crash experienced by users with Intel Gemini Lake CPUs. Mozilla does not provide any details on the crash. Intel Gemini Lake processors were released in 2017. They are considered low-powered chips that are primarily found in entry level devices such as low-cost laptops or desktop PCs. Intel Gemini Lake CPUs were sold as Celeron and Pentium Silver processors in 2017. They feature Intel UHD Graphics. Firefox 106.0.5 is the fifth point release of Firefox 106. Mozilla fixed crashes and freezes on some devices in Firefox 106.0.4, which it released just a day earlier. Firefox 106.0.3 fixed a crash and hangs on Windows, and Firefox 106.0.2 fixed a freeze and opening issues on some devices. The majority of these issues affected a small number of Firefox installations only and most were addressed by Mozilla quickly. Still, the release of five point releases resulted in increased update activity of the browser. Mozilla plans to release the next major version of Firefox, Firefox 107.0, on November 15, 2022.Firefox 108 follows in December, and it will be the last major Firefox release of the year. As to point releases, users should expect some for each of the major Firefox releases. Looking back, it is clear that most Firefox releases come with at least one point release. The last Firefox release without one was Firefox 93, released more than a year ago. Now You: what is your preference regarding updates? Firefox 106.0.5 fixes a crash on certain Intel systems Frontpaged: Mozilla Firefox Browser 106.0.5
  3. Last month, Microsoft published an advisory regarding boosting performance on Windows 11. In that, the company recommended disabling certain security features to gain gaming performance. So it was an option, a trade-off for those gamers who were willing to compromise a more secure device in lieu of raw horsepower. While Microsoft did not detail the kind of boost users could expect from the change, early reports from last year claimed that Memory Integrity or Virtualization-based Security (VBS) was leading to nearly 30% loss in certain scenarios, even on systems that were officially Windows 11 ready. It is generally considered that these features eat up CPU cycles and disk usage, among other things, which is why disabling them improves performance. And with memory integrity off, Intel's Arc discrete GPUs are seeing a decent uptick in performance. According to Twitter user Löschzwerg, the Arc A380 graphics card gained around two to three thousand points in 3DMark03, which is a DirectX 9 benchmark. To put the score into context, the card originally got around 58,000 points which is a 5.2% uptick in performance. Meanwhile, using DXVK, a Vulkan-based translation layer for Direct3D 9/10/11, the performance went up by three times in total as you can see in the images below. This is because Intel does not run DX9 natively on Arc and employs the D3D9On12 mapping layer. DXVK though is far more efficient at extracting the performance and it seems to help a lot for the driver overhead Intel discrete cards are currently having. After all, Arc is new and making efficient software takes time. Since the Arc A380, which is an entry-level card, was tested here, it is possible to a degree that the higher-end SKUs like the Arc A750 or A770 end up getting a bigger boost than the 5.2% noted here with the disabled Windows features. However, we must remember that synthetic 3D benchmarks like 3DMark are already quite light on CPU usage and there may be less headroom left for further gains. Source and images: Löschzwerg (Twitter) Microsoft's Windows 11 performance tips are helping Intel in a bit unexpected way
  4. With Intel Raptor Lake release, reviews are also out everywhere. While most reviews show best in the world performance, there’s a huge power usage issue. After a long wait, Intel finally released its Raptor Lake series of processors. Based on the same LGA1700 platform like its predecessor Alder Lake, Intel promised unparalleled performance in Raptor Lake. Initially, three main processors are now released in the market. The Core i9-13900K, the Core i7-13700K and the Core i5-13600K. Along with them, Intel also releases the KF version of these same processors, which do not come with any basic built-in graphics chip. While i9-13900K is priced at $589, i7-13700K comes at $409 and i5-13600K costs $319. The difference between these processors is that i9 13900K comes with 8 performance and 16 efficient cores. The i7-13700K on the other hand has the same 8 performance cores but cuts out the efficient cores to 8. The i5-13600K processor cuts out the performance cores to 6 but maintains the same efficient cores at 8. Intel Raptor Lake Desktop Processors. Credit: Intel. Many sites have not mentioned one important upgrade in these processors. The Intel Core i9-13900K not only comes with a 36MB L3 Cache, but it also comes with a massive 32MB L2 cache divided between cores. It was something which we had mentioned earlier as a possibility. A big L2 cache can give a big boost to the performance. Unlike AMD Ryzen 7000, Intel Raptor Lake series supports both DDR4 and DDR5 RAM. With their release, Intel has removed the restriction on the release of their reviews. Hence, many sites have already made their reviews public. The reviews are great to say the least. We will look at three of them in relation to gaming performance. Tom’s Hardware Review of Intel Raptor Lake Intel Raptor Lake Gaming Performance Average FPS at 1440p. Credit: Tom’s Hardware. Tom’s Hardware reviewed all three processors. The winner was outright visible. As far as gaming performance benchmarks are concerned, Intel i9-13900K completely defeats its opposition, including the likes of AMD Ryzen 7 5800X3D and AMD Ryzen 9 7950X processors. Not to forget it being significantly faster than previous gen Intel Alder Lake processors like Core i9 12900K. But the more interesting CPU is the $319 processor that is Intel Core i5-13600K. The i5-13600K manages to defeat all AMD Ryzen 7000 series processors, including the significantly higher priced AMD Ryzen 9 7950X. The only AMD Ryzen processor faster than the i5-13600K is the gaming oriented Ryzen 5800X3D, which comes with a huge L3 cache. Tom’s Hardware however found big issue in the power usage and temperatures. Core i9-13900K Power Usage. Credit: Tom’s Hardware. When tested without any limits, they found that Intel i9 13900K could hit a huge 308W power consumption and it hits the 100 C limit regularly. It must be mentioned here that the 308W power usage is of the CPU alone, that too at stock settings. This is a massive problem. However, might not be a big issue when gaming. Igor’sLab Review of Intel Raptor Lake Intel Raptor Lake Gaming Performance Average FPS at 1440p. Credit: Igor’sLab. igor’sLAB tested two Intel Raptor Lake Processors. Intel Core i9-13900K and i5-13600K. Here too, both i9-13900K and i5-13600K defeats the competition. In average FPS, Intel Core i9-13900K and i5-13600K are faster than all AMD Ryzen 7000 processors and also Intel Alder Lake processors. Three things to notice here. In their benchmarks, unlike Tom’s Hardware, Ryzen 7 5800X3D is slower than Ryzen 7950X, which is ideally how it should be – depends on the games tested. Second, a $319 Intel Core i5-13600K again beats AMD’s top of the line $699 Ryzen 9 7950X processor in gaming as far as average FPS is concerned. Third important thing is, while average FPS is higher in i5-13600K, it’s 1% FPS is lower than many others like AMD’s Ryzen 9 7950X, Ryzen 7 7700X, Ryzen 7 5800X3D and also Intel’s Core i9-12900K. Lower 1% FPS means games might hit higher FPS on average, but might cause slight jitters or might lag a bit. Overall, for smoother gameplay, low 1% FPS is quite important. So 1% FPS performance should also be considered before deciding upon things. Coming to power consumption, Igor’sLab gives some fascinating numbers. Intel Raptor Lake Power Draw. Credit: Igor’sLab. When tested to the max, Intel Core i9-13900K reached a huge 280W in power consumption, peaking at 286W. Intel Core i5-13600K on the hand reaches 154W. But there’s more to it. These are power usage at max loads. They are not maxed out by common users, including gamers. Intel Raptor Lake Gaming Max Power Draw In A Total War Saga TROY. While gaming, the average power consumption of Intel Core i9-13900K is 110W. In most games it is around 100W. Which is lower than what AMD Ryzen 9 7950X consumes. The Core i5-13600K too consumes 98W. This means the CPU is not consuming too much power while gaming and the huge power usage figures we see above is for highly specialized workloads that too at max performance. TechPowerUp’s Review of Intel Raptor Lake Intel Raptor Lake Relative Performance in Gaming At 1440. Credit: TechPowerUp. TechPowerUP reviewed both Intel Core i9-13900K and Intel Core i5-13600K individually. However, we are showing only the i5-13600K performance image as it contains the information for both the processors. TechPowerUP tested both the processors on 12 different games. The results were on the expected lines. Both i9-13900K and i5-13600K defeated them all. Now, the power consumption is something which takes the cake. Intel Raptor Lake i9-13900K Power Consumption. Credit: TechPowerUp At max load, here too, Core i9-13900K hits 283W. However, once all the restrictions are removed, Intel’s Core 13900K manages to hit a massive 388W in power usage. With further increase till 399W when overclocked. Intel Core i5-13600K too is not far behind. It reaches 186W at stock, 200W without power limits and 277W when overclocked. Again, this is CPU only power usage, that too at max load. It’s the not same in gaming. Intel Raptor Lake i9-13900K Power Consumption While Gaming. Credit: TechPowerUp. When gaming, Intel Core i9-13900K hits an average of 118W and 139W when overclocked. Intel Core i5-13600K, on the other hand, has an average of 73W power usage while gaming and reached 116W when overclocked. This again shows the same thing. Intel Raptor Lake processors can use a lot of power when required, but they are not doing so in gaming. TechPowerUP reviews mentioned some things which are really important. The Core i9-13900K could hit 5.8 GHz boost speeds on only two cores, at least on the CPU they got to test. Additionally, Core i5-13600K has no Turbo Boost 3.0 in it. What’s worse that they mention that in both the processors, when a PCIe 5.0 M.2 slot is in use, the graphics card PCIe slot limits itself to just x8 instead of x16. This can be a major issue depending on the graphics card. Conclusion We aren’t quite sure where to start. Out of many reviews, we chose 3 which we felt would summaries everything easily. There are many others which we did not cover, like the AnandTech one, which many might find too detailed and complex. We suggest everyone to go through all the above ones and see it for themselves what’s best for them. It’s never ideal to decide by seeing just one. As far as the CPUs are concerned. There’s no doubt that Intel Raptor Lake processors are above all in performance. At least as far as gaming is concerned, that is. When one takes Tom’s Hardware’s performance numbers into accounts, both the processors are about 10-15% faster than their previous generation Alder Lake counterparts. However, the power draw is a huge concern, even if we take just gaming power usage into the account. If performance has increased 10-15%, power usage has increased similarly too. Let us not forget there’s a huge energy problem happening in the world due to the war. There are going to be major power cuts happening in many parts of the world. Additional power usage is something people cannot afford. Especially during these times. Compared to AMD Ryzen 7000 series, Intel Raptor Lake absolutely takes the cake in gaming performance. It’s not only faster, it’s cheaper both as a processor and a platform. Also remember, Intel Raptor Lake technically is still on the 10nm process which Intel calls Intel 7 process as its comparable to the 7nm process of it’s rivals. Whereas, AMD Ryzen 7000 is on the latest gen 5nm process. So Intel consuming more power is expected, but Intel easily beating AMD is not. Some important points need to be made about AMD Ryzen 7000. It supports only DDR5 RAM and has a new AM5 CPU slot where the pins are on the motherboard and not on the CPU, unlike previous-gen AMD processors, making them extremely expensive. This has meant that when someone goes to make an AMD Ryzen 7000 PC, they will need to buy not only an expensive motherboard, but expensive DDR5 RAM too. So big is the price issue that, if reports are to be believed, AMD has decided to massively cut the production of its Ryzen 7000 processors due to a big lack of demand. Compare that to Intel Raptor Lake processors, which also run on Alder Lake supporting previous-gen Intel 600 series motherboards. They also don’t require relatively expensive DDR5 RAM to run. So both expensive motherboard and RAM sticks are not necessarily required if price is a concern. It means Ryzen 7000 as a platform is really expensive when compared to Intel currently. If we were to recommend a processor, Intel Core i5-13600K is an ideal choice. It’s great for gaming and does not use tremendous amount of power that i9-13900K does. The Intel Core i9-13900K, however, is on another level. If we ignore the claims that Intel has made about its processor, we are not sure how much the silicon inside it can take with so much max power usage. Still, benchmark reviews show that if power usage is not an issue, it’s the new king in the processor market. Unless AMD manages to outperform Intel with it’s next-gen 3D V-Cache 7950X3D, 7900X3D or 7800X3D processors, which it possibly might, Intel is expected to not only be the best but also be the fastest one around in gaming processors. Intel Raptor Lake Releases With Excellent Reviews
  5. Intel has prepared two new graphics drivers for its customers with supported processors featuring integrated GPUs. After recently shipping a massive 1.2 GB driver update for its ARC dGPU, the company applied the same treatment to its regular drivers, making customers download drivers that "weigh" more than one gigabyte. Customers with Intel CPUs who missed the previous driver update should note that Intel has split its graphics driver in two. One version is available for the latest 11th, 12th and 13th Gen processors, while another provides legacy software support for 6th-10th Gen CPUs. What is new in Intel Graphics Driver 31.0.101.3729? This update is available for customers with 11th, 12th and 13th Gen Intel processors. The changelog includes the following: Release highlights: Support for 13th Generation Intel® Core™ Processors with Intel® UHD Graphics. There are no fixes listed for this driver release. Known issues: Counter-Strike: Global Offensive* (DX9) may experience a game crash when changing shadow quality settings in game. Destiny 2* may exhibit display signal loss or display flashing during gameplay when HDR is enabled. Stranger of Paradise: Final Fantasy Origin* may experience an application crash during gameplay. An “Update driver” pop-up error message may be observed when launching Battlefield 1* after upgrading from30.0.100.9955 or older drivers. [12th Generation Intel Core Processors]: Lighting corruption may be observed in the Halo Infinite* (DX12) multiplayer menus. Grid Legends* (DX12) may experience lighting corruption when lighting quality is set to high in the games settings. CrossFire HD* (DX9) may experience an application crash when task switching during gameplay. Chorus* may experience an application crash in some interior areas of the game such as the ship hangar. Minor graphical anomalies may be seen in Destiny 2* (DX11), CrossFire HD* (DX9), GRID Legends* (DX12) (on changing lighting quality to high) and F1 2020* (DX12) when HDR is enabled. Sniper Elite 5* (DX12) may experience a game crash or TDR with an error dialog pop-up message. Red Dead Redemption 2* (DX12) may experience lower than expected performance when the game API is set to DirectX®12 with VSync enabled. [11th and 12th Generation Intel Core Processors]: Minor graphical anomalies may be seen in Gears 5* (DX12). A game crash or hang may occur when changing resolution in NBA 2K21* (DX12). [11th Generation Intel Core Processors with Intel Iris Xe graphics]: Minor graphical anomalies may be seen in Elex* (DX11), MechWarrior 5: Mercenaries* (DX12), Strange Brigade* (DX12) and The Ascent* (DX12). What is new in Intel Graphics Driver 31.0.101.2114? This driver is applicable to systems with 6th-10th Gen Intel Processors and with integrated graphics. Release highlights: Intel will be moving 6th - 10th Gen Intel Processor Graphics and related Intel Atom®, Pentium®, and Celeron® processor graphics to a legacy software support model. For more information on this support update and additional changes to the driver package, see Graphics Driver Support Update for 10th Generation and Older Intel Processor Graphics. Fixed Issues: An application crash may occur in Watch Dogs: Legion* (DX11) when starting the game And finally, here are the known issues affecting 6th to 10th gen CPUs: An intermittent crash or hang may occur during gameplay in Ghostwire: Tokyo* (DX12). An error message pop-up may be observed when launching Call of Duty: Vanguard* (DX12). Counter-Strike: Global Offensive* (DX9) may experience a game crash when changing shadow quality settings in game. Destiny 2* may exhibit display signal loss or display flashing during gameplay when HDR is enabled. Stranger of Paradise: Final Fantasy Origin* may experience an application crash during gameplay. Tom Clancy’s Ghost Recon Breakpoint* may experience minor shadow corruption in some areas of the game. CrossFire* (DX9) may experience an application crash and or security alert when joining a game. Minor graphical anomalies may be observed in Call of Duty: Warzone* (DX12), Diablo II: Resurrected* (DX12), Euro Truck Simulator* (DX11), Farming Simulator 22* (DX12), Grand Theft Auto V* (DX11), Halo Infinite* (DX12), Hitman 2* (DX12), Marvel’s Guardians of the Galaxy* (DX12) and Microsoft Flight Simulator*(DX11). An “Update driver” pop-up error message may be observed when launching Battlefield 1* after upgrading from 30.0.100.9955 or older drivers You can download the latest Intel Drivers from the official website. Intel Graphics v31.0.101.3729 driver includes support for 13th gen Raptor Lake
  6. You can build a smaller PC yourself, though the NUC will take out the guesswork. Intel's "Raptor Canyon" NUC brings Intel's mini PCs much closer in size to some mini ITX desktops that use standard components. Intel, via VideoCardz Intel's NUC Extreme series of mini PCs have always tried to straddle the line between keeping the NUC's traditional tininess and providing the power of a full-size desktop. The NUC 11 and NUC 12 Extreme models both included enough room inside for a dual-slot GPU up to around 300 mm in length, but the company is apparently going even further with the NUC 13 Extreme, codenamed "Raptor Canyon." Intel showed off a new version of the box at TwitchCon (via VideoCardz) that is large enough to fit a triple-slot GPU alongside new 13th-generation Intel Core CPUs. The Raptor Canyon box is apparently 13.9 L in volume, not quite double the 8 L volume of the NUC 12 Extreme. And that's still plenty small, but given the non-standard motherboard size and the amount these NUC Extreme boxes usually cost, we are drifting much closer to volumes you can achieve in some of the smaller mini ITX PC cases. Cases like the Sliger SM560 (11 L) or Sliger Conswole (10.9 L) can fit a triple-slot GPU in a smaller space, and the Cooler Master NR200P (18.5 L) or SSUPD Meshlicious (14.7 L) (geez, these names) are only a little larger and cost a bit less. The new NUC's non-standard motherboard, also called a "Compute Element," is a nonstandard part that will be hard or impossible to upgrade a few years from now. Intel, via VideoCardz The problem with compact-but-powerful ITX gaming builds—and the opening for the NUC 13 Extreme box—is that these cases are often tricky to build in and require careful measuring, planning, and cable management to ensure that all the components fit and that they're adequately cooled (I say this from sometimes-painful experience). Tiny cases and small-form-factor SFX power supplies also command their own price premium over full-size components. The benefit of building with standard parts is that you'll have more options for upgrading a few years down the road. But the simplicity of the NUC might be worth it for someone who wants something small and fast without all the hassle. It's sort of funny that we're hearing about this case on the same day as GeForce RTX 4090 reviews are going live—other cards in the 4000-series will surely be small enough to fit in a "mere" triple-slot case, and Nvidia's partners may even figure out how to do it with a 4090. But the trend has been toward ever-larger GPUs, and owners of this new NUC (or many other GPU-compatible ITX cases) may find triple-slot compatibility more limiting in the future than it has been in the past. The NUC 13 Extreme boasts triple-slot GPU compatibility, though graphics cards are already getting thicker than that. Intel, via VideoCardz Intel is also continuing to make smaller, more tightly integrated NUCs, like the recently announced NUC 12 Enthusiast box that combines a 12th-gen Intel Core CPU with a discrete Intel Arc GPU. Arc has its problems, but it's still surprisingly competitive with midrange Nvidia and AMD GPUs in many games. Intel is making a NUC desktop that’s big enough for a triple-slot GPU
  7. Intel has confirmed that a source code leak for the UEFI BIOS of Alder Lake CPUs is authentic, raising cybersecurity concerns with researchers. Alder Lake is the name of Intel's 12th generation Intel Core processors, released in November 2021. On Friday, a Twitter user named 'freak' posted links to what was said to be the source code for Intel Alder Lake's UEFI firmware, which they claim was released by 4chan. The link led to a GitHub repository named 'ICE_TEA_BIOS' that was uploaded by a user named 'LCFCASD.' This repository contained what was described as the 'BIOS Code from project C970.' Leaked Alder Lake BIOS source codeSource: BleepingComputer The leak contains 5.97 GB of files, source code, private keys, change logs, and compilation tools, with the latest timestamp on the files being 9/30/22, likely when a hacker or insider copied the data. BleepingComputer has been told that all the source code was developed by Insyde Software Corp, a UEFI system firmware development company. The leaked source code also contains numerous references to Lenovo, including code for integrations with 'Lenovo String Service', 'Lenovo Secure Suite', and 'Lenovo Cloud Service.' At this time, it is unclear whether the source code was stolen during a cyberattack or leaked by an insider. However, Intel has confirmed to Tom's Hardware that the source code is authentic and is its "proprietary UEFI code." "Our proprietary UEFI code appears to have been leaked by a third party. We do not believe this exposes any new security vulnerabilities as we do not rely on obfuscation of information as a security measure. This code is covered under our bug bounty program within the Project Circuit Breaker campaign, and we encourage any researchers who may identify potential vulnerabilities to bring them our attention through this program. We are reaching out to both customers and the security research community to keep them informed of this situation." - Intel spokesperson. Security researchers concerned While Intel has downplayed the security risks of the source code leak, security researchers warn that the contents could make it easier to find vulnerabilities in the code. "The attacker/bug hunter can hugely benefit from the leaks even if leaked OEM implementation is only partially used in the production," explains hardware security firm Hardened Vault. "The Insyde’s solution can help the security researchers, bug hunters (and the attackers) find the vulnerablity and understand the result of reverse engineering easily, which adds up to the long-term high risk to the users." Positive Technologies hardware researcher Mark Ermolov also warned that the leak included a KeyManifest private encryption key, a private key used to secure Intel's Boot Guard platform. While it is not clear if the leaked private key is used in production, if it is, hackers could potentially use it to modify the boot policy in Intel firmware and bypass hardware security. BleepingComputer has contacted Intel, Insyde, and Lenovo with questions about the leak and whether the private keys were used in production. We will update this article with any responses as we learn more. Intel confirms leaked Alder Lake BIOS Source Code is authentic
  8. A770 comes in two tiers; Intel claims "perf-per-dollar" wins over Nvidia RTX 3060. Intel arrives at a crucial sub-$300 price for its medium-end GPU option. But will that bear out as a worthwhile price compared to its performance? Intel Intel's highest-end graphics card lineup is approaching its retail launch, and that means we're getting more answers to crucial market questions of prices, launch dates, performance, and availability. Today, Intel answered more of those A700-series GPU questions, and they're paired with claims that every card in the Arc A700 series punches back at Nvidia's 18-month-old RTX 3060. After announcing a $329 price for its A770 GPU earlier this week, Intel clarified it would launch three A700 series products on October 12: The aforementioned Arc A770 for $329, which sports 8GB of GDDR6 memory; an additional Arc A770 Limited Edition for $349, which jumps up to 16GB of GDDR6 at slightly higher memory bandwidth and sports otherwise identical specs; and the slightly weaker A750 Limited Edition for $289. A770 (16GB model) and A750 specs breakdown. Intel If you missed the memo on that sub-$300 GPU when it was announced, the A750 LE is essentially a binned version of the A770's chipset, with 87.5 percent of the shading units and ray tracing (RT) units turned on, along with an ever-so-slightly downclocked boost clock (2.05 GHz, compared to 2.1 GHz on both A770 models). Intel previously confirmed that new purchases of Arc A700 series GPUs made by January 2023 would come with a bundle of downloadable games and software, including this year's remake of Call of Duty: Modern Warfare II, Gotham Knights, and more. Ahead of independent benchmarks, GPUs have a confusing “performance-per-dollar” metric A refresher on Intel's first-gen Arc GPU variety. Intel In a conference call with the press, Intel representatives declined to clarify initial shipment counts for its first three A700-series GPUs other than to suggest low stock for the larger-memory A770 LE: "I suspect we're going to sell out of that one very quickly," Intel Graphics Fellow Tom Petersen told Ars. He was reluctant to clarify whether he expected early sellouts of Intel's A700 GPUs, "We don't know if we're going to have a supply problem or a demand problem. I hope we have a demand problem." He then confirmed that Intel plans to produce its own in-house GPU models over time instead of cutting off "LE" production while demand might still exist. Unfortunately, Intel compounded the GPUs' availability question by not confirming which add-in board (AIB) partners would be part of the A700 series' October rollout. Petersen kicked that can down the road by suggesting those third-party GPU manufacturers will make their own announcements, then mentioned an interest in expanding its list of Arc-powered AIBs. A750 vs. RTX 3060, in vague tests not independently verified by Ars Technica. Intel Intel's latest presentation includes game benchmark measurements that directly compare the 8GB A750 with an EVGA model of the RTX 3060, which sports 12GB of GDDR6 RAM. Intel's testing results have not yet been independently verified by Ars Technica. The above chart and a few others use a confusing "performance-per-dollar" metric to obfuscate raw comparisons in frame rates without listing raw frame rates or clear percentage differences. But Intel seems determined to make that performance-per-dollar metric quite loud in the A700 series' promotional effort, as it has advertised that the higher-end A770, priced at $349, nets "42 percent" more performance-per-dollar, on average, than an RTX 3060 that sells at retailers for an average of $418. The same fuzzy-math sales pitch suggests that the $289 A750 will net "53 percent" more average performance-per-dollar than the same RTX 3060 model. We look forward to someone in the Ars comments section breaking down that incomplete algebra formula to determine the actual performance gap between each product, at least according to their own internal testing methodology. Perhaps it will align with previous Intel comments that peg the A750 at roughly 3 to 5 percent faster than the RTX 3060. Intel continued conceding the Arc series' biggest teething issue in its first generation: A700 series' drivers and hardware are not so far doing a fantastic job besting the RTX 3060 in DirectX 11 performance. Although Intel claims that a few DX11 games have nearly identical performance or even superior performance on Arc A770 compared to the RTX 3060, its reps admit that Nvidia has a generally noticeable lead on those older games. When pressed about how each GPU compares to the better-reviewed RTX 3060 Ti, Petersen pushed back, again apparently stuck on the pricing gap between GPUs: "Pricing on the 3060 Ti is just crazy, so we didn't want to include that in our analysis," he said. As I've previously covered, the RTX 3060 emerged with a severe performance drop compared to the 3060 Ti—though, if Intel manages to push meaningful gains in general rasterization, specific ray tracing workloads, and XeSS-powered image reconstruction, its price-to-power metric may pan out for anyone eager to buy an Nvidia alternative (so long as it's in stock at your favorite retailer, anyway). We'll have more on the A700 series of GPUs soon at Ars Technica. The rest of Intel Arc’s A700-series GPU prices: A750 lands Oct. 12 below $300
  9. Alongside the Arc driver version 31.0.101.3430, Intel has simultaneously also released the drivers for its integrated graphics. While the Arc driver already supports the newer Xe LP-based integrated graphics found in the 11th and 12th Gen chips, Intel releases a separate package which bundles these alongside the legacy 31.0.101.2111 driver for older products from 6th Generation all the way up to the 10th Generation graphics. Hence all integrated graphics drivers are in one place. The new 31.0.101.3430 WHQL driver brings XeSS improvements as well as a crashfix for Red Dead Redemption 2. Find the full changelog below: NOTES: Intel® Xe Super Sampling (XeSS) stability improvements for Intel® Iris™ Xe Graphics. FIXED ISSUES: Red Dead Redemption 2* (Vulkan) may experience an application crash when performing an ALT+TAB to desktop. KNOWN ISSUES: Counter-Strike: Global Offensive* (DX9) may experience a game crash when changing shadow quality settings in game. Destiny 2* may exhibit display signal loss or display flashing during gameplay when HDR is enabled. Stranger of Paradise: Final Fantasy Origin* may experience an application crash during gameplay. An “Update driver” pop-up error message may be observed when launching Battlefield 1* after upgrading from 30.0.100.9955 or older drivers. [12th Generation Intel Core Processors]: Lighting corruption may be observed in the Halo Infinite* (DX12) multiplayer menus. Grid Legends* (DX12) may experience lighting corruption when lighting quality is set to high in the games settings. CrossFire HD* (DX9) may experience an application crash when task switching during gameplay. Chorus* may experience an application crash in some interior areas of the game such as the ship hangar. Minor graphical anomalies may be seen in Destiny 2* (DX11), CrossFire HD* (DX9), GRID Legends* (DX12) (on changing lighting quality to high) and F1 2020* (DX12) when HDR is enabled. Sniper Elite 5* (DX12) may experience a game crash or TDR with an error dialog pop-up message. Red Dead Redemption 2* (DX12) may experience lower than expected performance when the game API is set to DirectX®12 with VSync enabled. [11th and 12th Generation Intel Core Processors]: Minor graphical anomalies may be seen in Gears 5* (DX12). A game crash or hang may occur when changing resolution in NBA 2K21* (DX12). [11th Generation Intel Core Processors with Intel Iris Xe graphics]: Minor graphical anomalies may be seen in Elex* (DX11), MechWarrior 5: Mercenaries* (DX12), Strange Brigade* (DX12) and The Ascent* (DX12). To download this combined 31.0.101.2111 and 31.0.101.3430 driver package, head over to Intel's official website at this link. Like mentioned above, the release is compatible with all Intel integrated graphics from the 6th Gen all the way up to the latest 12th Gen. Intel 31.0.101.3430 driver brings XeSS improvements, RDR 2 crashfix Frontpaged: Intel Graphics Driver 31.0.101.3430 | 101.2111
  10. Intel held its Innovation 2022 event last night where the company announced its Raptor Lake-S lineup that out-competes AMD price-wise. The company also launched its Arc A770 limited edition GPU which is the flagship Arc Alchemist graphics card. Intel claims performance parity with Nvidia's RTX 3060 Ti and AMD's RX 6700 XT at a cheaper price point. Alongside these, the firm also revealed several other interesting technologies like Unison, pluggable co-package photonics, and more. Sadly however, Intel's latest 31.0.101.3430 Arc WHQL driver does not support the new A770. The card is set to be available on a later date so we will probably see a driver supporting it closer to that. In terms of what the driver brings, there is a new Arc Control with version 4765, XeSS improvements, and a ton of bug fixes. Find the full changelog below: NOTES: The Intel® Arc™ 101.3430 BETA [sic] driver is bundled with the latest version of Intel® Arc™ Control 4765 to streamline installation experience, resulting in a larger driver package file size. Intel® Xe Super Sampling (XeSS) stability improvements for Intel® Arc™ A-Series Graphics and Intel® Iris™ Xe Graphics. FIXED ISSUES: Total War: Warhammer III* (DX11) may exhibit color corruption on certain regions of the overworld map. Call of Duty: Vanguard* (DX12) may exhibit lower than expected performance in the main menu. Marvel’s Guardian of the Galaxy* (DX12) may exhibit flickering texture corruption in certain areas Horizon Zero Dawn* (DX12) may exhibit texture and color corruption on some terrain and skyboxes. Overwatch* (DX11) may experience lower than expected performance within certain map environments Metro Exodus* (DX11) may exhibit a CTD or application hang during gameplay. Conqueror’s Blade* (DX11) may exhibit an application crash during game launch. League of Legends* (DX11) may experience lower than expected performance when using the DX11 option in on some Intel® Arc™ A730M series graphics products. Sniper Elite 5* (DX12) may experience an application crash on some Hybrid Graphics system configurations when Windows® “Graphics Performance Preference” option for the application is not set to “High Performance”. Movies and TV* Application may experience a hang during HDR video playback and changing video to Fullscreen. Blender* may exhibit OpenGL rendering errors with certain Intel® system configurations. Some Intel® Arc™ A380 series graphics cards may intermittently reboot the system when resuming from S3 sleep. INTEL® ARC™ CONTROL FIXED ISSUES: Recording with Arc Control Studio Capture and “In Stream” mode enabled may not save the output video file at the desired length. Streaming with Arc Control Studio Capture and “In Stream” mode enabled may cause unexpected connection instability to the desired platform. Some image types may not load when using Arc Control Camera “Background Replacement” option. Arc Control may incorrectly be invoked during the login screen. Arc Control may incorrectly close automatically when Arc Control is invoked, and system is left idle. KNOWN ISSUES: Marvel’s Spider-Man* (DX12) may exhibit an application crash when loading into the game with Ray-Traced Reflections enabled. Marvel’s Spider-Man* (DX12) may experience shadow corruption when using FSR 2.0 upscaling. Marvels’ Spider-Man* (DX12) may exhibit scene corruption when Ambient Occlusion is disabled or set to HBAO+ Battlefield 2042* (DX12) may exhibit an application crash when entering a multiplayer match. Some Intel® Arc™ A380 series graphics product fans may continue running when the graphics card or system is idle. INTEL® ARC™ CONTROL KNOWN ISSUES: Windows UAC Admin is required to install and launch Arc Control. Arc Control may fail to correctly update. A workaround is to uninstall Arc Control from Add or Remove programs before updating. Some applications may exhibit a transparent or blank window when CMAA is set to “Force ON” globally. Some applications may exhibit pixel corruption when Sharpening Filter is enabled globally. Opening Arc Control in some game titles with ALT+I during gameplay may not correctly appear. Using Arc Control Studio Capture with “In Stream” mode enabled may not correctly record entire clip when under a 1080p resolution setting. A 1440p resolution selection in Arc Control Studio Capture may be unavailable when the display native resolution is 4K. Arc Control Studio Camera overlay position may not retain desired position and size after a system restart. Hot-plugging peripheral devices such as cameras, microphones, or displays while Arc Control is open may cause Arc Control to become unresponsive. Arc Control may not scale automatically when changing from a 1080p resolution to a 4K resolution. Some Arc Control Telemetry metrics may not align with 3 rd party applications or built-in OS functions. The Arc Control Studio Camera tab may take longer than expected responsiveness upon the first navigation. Hot-plugging a secondary display with Arc Control invoked may cause Arc Control to be unresponsive. Hot-plugging a display with Arc Control Studio Capture audio device set to display audio may cause an error when attempting to capture or broadcast. Intel® Arc™ Control Performance Tuning (BETA): Intel® Arc™ Control Performance Tuning is currently in Beta. As such, performance and features may behave unexpectedly. Intel® will continue to refine the Performance Tuning software in future releases. The new Arc 31.0.101.3430 driver is compatible with all Xe architecture graphics. This includes Arc GPUs (except the A770, for now), Intel 11th Gen, 12th Gen and Iris Xe discrete graphics (DG1). To download the driver, head over to Intel's official website here. Intel's latest 31.0.101.3430 Arc driver does not support the new A770 Frontpaged: Intel Graphics Driver 31.0.101.3430 | 101.2111
  11. At the Intel Innovations event today, Intel introduced advanced graphic cards, processors, and software in pursuit of helping developers with their challenges. Intel CEO Pat Gelsinger shared some of the solutions the company came up with to tackle the difficulties faced by software and hardware developers. Gelsinger showcased Intel’s Developer Cloud, which works like any beta program for partners and developers by giving them early access to Intel’s projects. These beta testers will try out Intel’s processors, such as the 4th Gen Intel Xeon processors, Intel Xeon D processors, 4th Gen Intel Xeon Scalable processors, Intel’s Data Center GPUs, and a few others initially. Intel is also launching the Intel Geti platform with built-in optimizations for OpenVINO – Intel’s open-source toolkit that helps boost computer vision AI that enables enterprise members like developers and data scientists to create AI mode. Additionally, Intel announced new products like the 13th Gen Intel Core desktop processors, which the company claims to provide “41% better multi-threaded performance gen-over-gen” while giving a better gaming experience and “up to 15% better single-threaded performance.” Moreover, it introduced the Intel Unison Solution which allows PC connectivity with other devices across different operating systems to ensure a universal experience. It will let iOS and Android users transfer files, make calls, send and receive messages and see phone notifications from their PCs. It with be available on Intel Evo laptops with 12th Gen Intel Core processors from Lenovo, HP, and Acer this year while 13th Gen core-based models will receive it next year. Intel also disclosed the shipment of Intel Data Center GPU, otherwise known as Ponte Vecchio, which to be used in the Aurora supercomputer at the Argonne National Laboratory. As for the Flex Series GPUs, they will support deep learning platforms like OpenVINO, PyTorch, and TensorFlow. The company is also launching the A770 Intel Arc GPU on October 12th, enabling 1440p gaming performance as well as the Xe Super Sampling (XeSS) image upscaling algorithm, which will be available on 20-plus titles and existing games gradually. It is also adding the Intel On Demand activation model enabling customers to activate additional accelerators for AI analytics, networking, and more. Furthermore, Intel mentioned serving as a system foundry incorporating components and stated: “Intel and Intel Foundry Services will usher in the era of the systems foundry with four major components: wafer manufacturing, packaging, software and an open chiplet ecosystem.” Intel is also developing pluggable co-package photonics solution which it claims reduces costs and creates possibilities for development in the chip packaging industry. The company explains: a breakthrough pluggable co-package photonics solution. Optical connections hold promise to enable new levels of chip-to-chip bandwidth, particularly in the data center, but manufacturing difficulties make them untenably expensive. To overcome this, Intel researchers devised a robust, high-yielding, glass-based solution with a pluggable connector that simplifies manufacturing and lowers costs, opening possibilities for new system and chip package architectures in the future. Lastly, Intel disclosed three startups: Astera, Movellus, and SiFive, for having received the first round of the IFS Innovation fund announced in February. The $1 billion fund is Intel’s effort to develop the semiconductor industry and foundry ecosystem. Source: Intel Everything at Intel Innovation 2022: Raptor Lake, Arc, XeSS, Unison Technology, and more
  12. AMD launched its Ryzen 7000 series desktop processor lineup recently. While the performance of the new chips is in line with what AMD made us believe, the pricing is definitely on the higher side. The 16 core 32 thread (16C/32T) Ryzen 9 7950X, the 12C/24T Ryzen 9 7900X, the 8C/16T Ryzen 7 7700X and the 6C/12T Ryzen 5 7600X, are priced at $699, $549, $399 and $299 respectively. While at a first glance, the prices don't seem too bad compared to last gen products, the total platform cost is actually pretty steep. This is because Zen 4 CPUs are only compatible with DDR5, which is still quite expensive compared to DDR4. Meanwhile, Intel's 13th Gen Raptor Lake-S desktop CPUs will support DDR4 as well as DDR5 just like its predecessor Alder Lake did. Speaking of Raptor Lake, Intel, as expected, released the new lineup today at the Innovation 2022 event. While the spec details had already leaked earlier, the pricing was still a mystery. A few hours ago, Newegg posted the retail prices of the SKUs and they appeared very competitive. While those could certainly have been placeholder values, Intel itself has now confirmed that Raptor Lake is indeed more affordable overall. The 24 core 32 thread (24C/32T) Core i9-13900K, the 16C/24T i7-13700K, and the 14C/20T i5-13600K are priced at $589, $409, and $319 respectively. The F-series without the on-board graphics are slightly cheaper. Adding in the platform costs to the processor prices, we could have a situation where Intel CPUs could end up being the more affordable option, something which was incomprehensible a decade ago. You can view the full specifications and pricing details in the image below: Here's a performance demo of Raptor Lake put together by Intel: The chips are slated to be available next month starting on October 20. Source: Intel Intel has just killed AMD's Ryzen 7000 with very competitive Raptor Lake pricing
  13. High-end chips have more cache and cores; laptop and mid-range CPUs come later. An overview of the improvements coming to Intel's 13th-gen desktop chips. Intel If there's one thing Intel has gotten good at in the last few years, it's refining a CPU architecture. Between 2015 and 2020, manufacturing troubles pushed Intel to release not one, not two, but five processor generations based on iterations of the sixth-gen Skylake core, while still managing to increase clock speeds and core counts enough to stay competitive through most of that timespan. It's an approach Intel is returning to for its 13th-generation Core CPUs, the first of which are being officially announced today. Codenamed Raptor Lake, Intel says it has made some improvements to the CPU architecture and the Intel 7 manufacturing process, but the strategy for improving their performance is both time-tested and easy to understand: add more cores, and make them run at higher clock speeds. Intel is announcing three new CPUs today, each with and without integrated graphics (per usual, the models with no GPUs have an "F" at the end): the Core i9-13900K, Core i7-13700K, and Core i5-13600K will launch on October 20 alongside new Z790 chipsets and motherboards. They will also work in all current-generation 600-series motherboards as long as your motherboard maker has provided a BIOS update, and will continue to support both DDR4 and DDR5 memory. Raptor Lake uses the hybrid architecture that Intel introduced in its 12th-generation Alder Lake chips last year—a combination of large performance cores (P-cores) that keep games and other performance-sensitive applications running quickly, plus clusters of smaller efficiency cores (E-cores) that use less power—though in our testing across laptops and desktops, it's clear that "efficiency" is more about the number of cores can be fit into a given area on a CPU die, and less about lower overall system power consumption. There have been a handful of other additions as well. The amount of L2 cache per core has been nearly doubled, going from 1.25MB to 2MB per P-core and from 2MB to 4MB per E-core cluster (E-cores always come in clusters of four). The CPUs will officially support DDR5-5600 RAM, up from a current maximum of DDR5-4800, though that DDR5-4800 maximum can easily be surpassed with XMP memory kits in 12th-generation motherboards. The maximum officially supported DDR4 RAM speed remains DDR4-3200, though the caveat about XMP applies there as well. Extra cache, faster memory speeds, and boosted clock speed are responsible for the single-threaded performance gains for the i9-13900K. Additional E-cores make the multi-core improvements much more significant. Intel As far as core counts and frequencies go, the Core i5 and Core i7 CPUs each pick up one extra E-core cluster, going from four E-cores to eight. The Core i9 gets two new E-core clusters, boosting the core count from eight all the way up to 16. All E-cores have maximum boost clocks that are 400MHz higher than they were before. P-core count stays the same across the lineup, but the maximum boost clock has been increased by 600MHz, 400MHz, and 200MHz for the Core i9, i7, and i5, respectively. As K-series chips, these are all unlocked for overclocking when used with Z690 or Z790 motherboards. Launch pricing is going up by $30 for the Core i5 models, but staying level for the other two. As usual, Intel doesn't include any CPU coolers with K- or KF-series chips. Here's how each CPU stacks up to its predecessor: CPU Launch MSRP P/E-cores Clocks (Base/Boost) Total cache (L2+L3) Base/Max Power Core i9-13900K $589 $564 (F) 8P/16E 3.0/5.8 GHz (P) 2.2/4.3 GHz (E) 68MB (32 + 36) 125/253 W Core i9-12900K $589 $564 (F) 8P/8E 3.2/5.2 GHz (P) 2.4/3.9 GHz (E) 34MB (14 + 30) 125/241 W Core i7-13700K $409 $384 (F) 8P/8E 3.4/5.4 GHz (P) 2.5/4.2 GHz (E) 54 MB (24 + 30) 125/253 W Core i7-12700K $490 $384 (F) 8P/4E 3.6/5.0 GHz (P) 2.7/3.8 GHz (E) 37 MB (12 + 25) 125/190 W Core i5-13600K $319 $294 (F) 6P/8E 3.5/5.1 GHz (P) 2.6/3.9 GHz (E) 44 MB (24 + 20) 125/181 W Core i5-12600K $289 $264 (F) 6P/4E 3.7/4.9 GHz (P) 2.8/3.6 GHz (E) 29.5 MB (9.5 + 20) 125/150 W According to Intel, all of the changes together will boost the i9-13900K's single-threaded performance by around 15 percent, with most of the improvement attributable to P-core clock speed increases. That's short of the 29 percent AMD accomplished across the lineup with its Zen 4 chips, and it will be lower for the i7 and the i5. But it's reasonably respectable for a year-over-year increase. Multi-threaded performance is where you'll see the biggest gains, with the added cache, boosted clock speeds, and increased E-core counts all coming together to improve the i9-13900K's performance by 41 percent compared to the i9-12900K (though, again, that number may be less impressive for the i7 and i5). Since the manufacturing process is, at best, only improving modestly, the price you’ll pay for the extra clock speed and core counts is higher power usage. Intel is keeping the base power of these 13th-gen CPUs unchanged at 125 W, but the Maximum Turbo Power numbers have gone up quite a bit—the Core i9-13900K’s 253 W maximum is the maximum amount of power officially supported by the LGA1700 socket, though it’s possible that some high-end motherboards could let it go even higher. The i9-13900K can be quite power-efficient compared to the i9-12900K, though its default configuration allows for higher power use overall. Intel But that doesn't mean Intel is throwing power efficiency entirely out the window, either. When restricted to a 65 W base power, Intel says that the improvements to Raptor Lake will allow the chips to run multi-threaded workloads just as quickly as a Core i9-12900K running at 241 W. As has become the norm for these kinds of high-end parts, they will default to fast performance with high power usage, but users can rein them in if they want. As for the accompanying Z790 chipset, it has a few improvements over the previous-generation Z690, but is likely nothing worth upgrading for if you're already using a 600-series motherboard you like. The chipset now sports a total of 20 PCIe 4.0 lanes for SSDs and other accessories, plus eight PCIe 8.0 lanes—Z690 has 12 PCIe 4.0 lanes and 16 PCIe 3.0 lanes, so clearly Intel is just shifting the balance in the direction of the faster interconnect. Z790 also supports one additional 20Gbps USB 3.2 Gen 2x2 port, for a total of five, and removes support for basic USB 2.0 ports entirely. The platform's PCIe 5.0 lanes for GPUs and next-gen SSDs are still built into the processor, not the chipset itself. The Z790 chipset has more PCIe 4.0 lanes and 20Gbps USB ports than Z690. But if you have a 600-series motherboard you already like, it will probably get a BIOS update allowing it to support 13th-gen CPUs, and none of the improvements to Z790 are worth an additional purchase. Intel Intel didn't announce any other 13th-generation CPU models today, but it teased that the standard range of chips would be following in the coming months—lower-wattage, lower-cost desktop parts, as well as laptop CPUs designed for everything from thin-and-light ultrabooks to bulky LED-festooned gaming laptops. Intel says that we can expect other desktop CPUs in the lineup to get more E-cores, too, something that previous rumors had already suggested. We'd expect to learn more about these chips at CES in January. Intel’s 13th-gen “Raptor Lake” CPUs are official, launch October 20
  14. Foldable is out, slidable is in Samsung Display and Intel are working on “slidable” PCs. During Intel’s Innovation keynote today, Samsung Display CEO JS Choi appeared onstage to show off a prototype PC that slides from a 13-inch tablet into a 17-inch display. “We’re announcing the world’s first 17-inch slidable display for PCs,” said Choi. “This device will satisfy various needs for a larger screen and portability as well.” Samsung Display has chosen to implement a sliding (rather than foldable) technology for its flexible PC displays, and Choi appeared to indicate that “foldable is gone” on PCs for now. Intel has been experimenting with new PC form factors for years and was initially preparing for a dual-screen and foldable future before Microsoft dropped its plans for Windows 10X on foldables. These types of new form factors desperately need the software and apps to make them shine, and it’s not clear yet how Intel will make slidable PCs a reality. The prototype device that Samsung Display and Intel have shown off today essentially turns a 13-inch tablet into a 17-inch monitor with a flexible display and a sliding mechanism. Intel was quick to demonstrate its new Unison software on this display, which aims to connect Intel-powered computers to smartphones — including iPhones. The slidable PC itself is just a concept for now, and there’s no word from Intel or Samsung Display on when it will become a reality. Intel and Samsung are getting ready for ‘slidable’ PCs
  15. The Italian government and Intel have selected Vigasio, Veneto, as the location of a planned chip factory, according to two sources who spoke to Reuters. The two entities were interested in settling where the factory would be built before today’s general election, in which the Brothers of Italy party is polling in first place. It’s reported that aides to the current leader, Mario Draghi, will negotiate with the new government to avoid disruption to the factory plans. The selection of Veneto was made in early September, where both parties thrashed out a “comprehensive agreement”. Neither will be making any public statements on the matter until after the election today. Vigasio is well-connected with Germany through Austria, which will allow Intel to move resources between this site and two factories it’s planning to build in Magdeburg, Germany. The factory will be used for advanced semiconductor packaging and the assembly of chips. The whole arrangement is expected to cost $5 billion, but the government is stumping up some of this money. This will be one of the issues that will have to be approved by the incoming government. The country has also been talking with STMicroelectronics, MEMC Electronic Materials, TSMC, and Israeli Tower Semiconductor to establish factories in the country. The cost of this factory will partly come from the $88 billion that Intel has earmarked for boosting European chip capacity. Following the COVID-19 pandemic, it became evident that there was too large a dependence on Asian chip producers, which were heavily affected by strict lockdowns to control the virus. Italy and Intel choose Veneto for the location of a new chip factory
  16. Intel has released its latest Windows DCH beta driver version 31.0.101.3430 for Arc graphics cards as well as for its Xe LP based integrated graphics. The biggest highlight of the new release is support for Windows 11 version 22H2 feature update. Aside from that, it also brings support for a couple of games including Call of Duty: Modern Warfare II Beta, which is currently in early access. Find the full changelog below: GAMING HIGHLIGHTS: Intel® Game On Driver support on Intel® Arc™ A-series Graphics for: The DioField Chronicle* (DX12) Call of Duty: Modern Warfare II* (DX12) Beta Early Access NOTES: The Intel® Arc™ 101.3430 BETA driver is bundled with the latest version of Intel® Arc™ Control 4765 to streamline installation experience, resulting in a larger driver package file size. FIXED ISSUES: Marvel’s Spider-Man* (DX12) may exhibit an application crash when loading into the game with Ray-Traced Reflections enabled. Total War: Warhammer III* (DX11) may exhibit color corruption on certain regions of the overworld map. Call of Duty: Vanguard* (DX12) may exhibit lower than expected performance in the main menu. Marvel’s Guardian of the Galaxy* (DX12) may exhibit flickering texture corruption game certain areas Horizon Zero Dawn* (DX12) may exhibit texture and color corruption on some terrain and skyboxes. Overwatch* (DX11) may experience lower than expected performance may be observed within certain map environments Metro Exodus* (DX11) may exhibit a CTD or application hang during gameplay. Conqueror’s Blade* (DX11) may exhibit an application crash during game launch. League of Legends* (DX11) may experience lower than expected performance when using the DX11 option in on some Intel® Arc™ A730M series graphics products. Movies and TV* Application may experience a hang during HDR video playback and changing video to Fullscreen. Blender* may exhibit OpenGL rendering errors with certain Intel® system configurations. Some Intel® Arc™ A380 series graphics cards may intermittently reboot the system when resuming from S3 sleep. INTEL® ARC™ CONTROL FIXED ISSUES: Recording with Arc Control Studio Capture and “In Stream” mode enabled may not save the output video file at the desired length. Streaming with Arc Control Studio Capture and “In Stream” mode enabled may cause unexpected connection instability to the desired platform. Some image types may not load when using Arc Control Camera “Background Replacement” option. Arc Control may incorrectly be invoked during the login screen. Arc Control may incorrectly close automatically when Arc Control is invoked, and system is left idle. KNOWN ISSUES: Marvel’s Spider-Man* (DX12) may experience shadow corruption when using FSR 2.0 upscaling. Marvels’ Spider-Man* (DX12) may exhibit scene corruption when Ambient Occlusion is disabled or set to HBAO+ Sniper Elite 5* (DX12) may experience an application crash on some Hybrid Graphics system configurations when Windows® “Graphics Performance Preference” option for the application is not set to “High Performance”. Some Intel® Arc™ A380 series graphics product fans may continue running when the graphics card or system is idle. INTEL® ARC™ CONTROL KNOWN ISSUES: Windows UAC Admin is required to install and launch Arc Control. Arc Control may fail to correctly update. A workaround is to uninstall Arc Control from Add or Remove programs before updating. Some applications may exhibit a transparent or blank window when CMAA is set to “Force ON” globally. Some applications may exhibit pixel corruption when Sharpening Filter is enabled globally. Opening Arc Control in some game titles with ALT+I during gameplay may not correctly appear. Using Arc Control Studio Capture with “In Stream” mode enabled may not correctly record entire clip when under a 1080p resolution setting. A 1440p resolution selection in Arc Control Studio Capture may be unavailable when the display native resolution is 4K. Arc Control Studio Camera overlay position may not retain desired position and size after a system restart. Hot-plugging peripheral devices such as cameras, microphones, or displays while Arc Control is open may cause Arc Control to become unresponsive. Arc Control may not scale automatically when changing from a 1080p resolution to a 4K resolution. Some Arc Control Telemetry metrics may not align with 3 rd party applications or built-in OS functions. The Arc Control Studio Camera tab may take longer than expected responsiveness upon the first navigation. Hot-plugging a secondary display with Arc Control invoked may cause Arc Control to be unresponsive. Hot-plugging a display with Arc Control Studio Capture audio device set to display audio may cause an error when attempting to capture or broadcast. Intel® Arc™ Control Performance Tuning (BETA): Intel® Arc™ Control Performance Tuning is currently in Beta. As such, performance and features mmay behave unexpectedly. Intel® will continue to refine the Performance Tuning software in future releases. You can download the driver by heading over to Intel's official website at this link. The driver is compatible with Intel Arc discrete graphics cards alongside Intel 11th and 12th Gen processor graphics. Intel Arc, 11th Gen, 12th Gen now ready for Windows 11 22H2 with 31.0.101.3430 beta driver
  17. Intel has announced today that it is killing the well known "Pentium" and "Celeron" branding for its mobile processors releasing in 2023 and beyond. They will be replaced by a simple "Intel Processor" branding instead. The company states that the reason for this is to simplify its lower end product stack. Josh Newman, Intel vice president and interim general manager of Mobile Client Platforms announced the change stating: Whether for work or play, the importance of the PC has only become more apparent as the torrid pace of technological development continues to shape the world. Intel is committed to driving innovation to benefit users, and our entry-level processor families have been crucial for raising the PC standard across all price points. The new Intel Processor branding will simplify our offerings so users can focus on choosing the right processor for their needs. Intel did not speak of desktop CPUs, so it is unclear if the branding will continue to be used for desktop SKUs or not. The Pentium branding was introduced back in 1993 and Celeron followed five years later in 1998. While both of these are associated with entry level basic products today, the Pentium, especially, denoted mainstream and high performance parts at least until the Intel Core CPUs debuted in 2006. Intel to kill Pentium and Celeron brands come 2023 for mobile chips
  18. Earlier today, Intel began its Technology Tour 2022 event where the company discussed about the upcoming 13th Generation Raptor Lake Core CPUs. During the discussion, it seemingly confirmed the clock frequency specifications of the binned Core i9-13900KS part which will have a base clock of a whopping 6GHz. Alongside that, other specs like DDR5 speed support as well as an 8GHz overclocking world record news were also shared. Following that, Intel, on its official website today has also published a gaming guide and in the article, the firm has confirmed the core and frequency specifications of the Core i9-13900K, the i7-13700K, and the i5-13600K. A screenshot of that portion of the webpage is given below: The information here matches with leaked purported official slides which contain more details about the Raptor Lake-S SKUs. The slides also feature details about the accompanying flagship Z790 chipset that will succeed Z690 LGA1700 motherboards. Like the previously leaked Intel slides, there is no mention of any Core i3 Raptor Lake which implies that such a chip is unlikely to launch alongside the top-end unlocked (overclockable) i5, i7 and i9 parts. However, earlier reports have hinted at the possible specifications one could expect from a Raptor Lake-S i3. Aside from the i3, some more i5 models have are also rumored. Source: Intel via momomo_us (Twitter) Intel officially confirms Raptor Lake Core i9-13900K, i7-13700K, i5-13600K specs
  19. Intel's 13th Gen Raptor Lake launch is fast approaching according to leaked reports, and as such, plenty of information is trickling out here and there. Alleged details regarding the SKUs have surfaced, initially in the form of just basic specifications, followed later with more in-depth details. A few days ago, the accompanying Z790 chipset details as well as purported official Intel Raptor Lake slides were also leaked. At the Intel Technology Tour 2022 event today, Intel officially shared some more information about its upcoming Raptor Lake processors. The Tech Tour is for its Israel development center and the company spoke about all that it has achieved over the years at the Israel dev center, starting all the way back from the 8088 in 1979 to the latest upcoming 13th Generation Raptor Lake (RPL) Core. The exciting part about today's announcement is the clock speed confirmation on RPL. While Intel has been consistently pushing up clocks over its last few CPU generations, this time, the company has gone almost all the way with Raptor Lake as it is now confirmed to feature an insane 6GHz base clock. Previously leaked information regarding the Core i9-13900K and 13900KF does not come anywhere close to this level of speed. Hence, it's likely Intel is hinting at the base speed of the Core i9-13900KS SKU where the KS samples are basically pre-binned chips that pack very high clock speeds right out of the box. Intel has also revealed that an 8GHz world record clock frequency has been attained on Raptor Lake. The image above shows a 13900KF engineering sample (ES) running at 8.1GHz. The above image also confirms the 13900KF's Thermal Velocity boost frequency of 5.8GHz which had leaked earlier in slides. Images via Jim McGregor (Twitter), Daniel Rubino (Twitter), @wxnod (Twitter) Intel seemingly confirms Raptor Lake i9-13900KS 6GHz base clock, and 8GHz overclock
  20. Raptor Lake boosts clocks, cache, and core counts on the same Intel 7 process. Intel is gearing up to release the first products in its 13th-generation Core processor family, codenamed Raptor Lake. Among the topline facts that the company announced at its Intel Technology Tour is that at least one member of the Raptor Lake family will be capable of hitting 6 GHz out of the box (via Tom's Hardware). Core counts and architectural improvements are generally more important than clock speed when it comes to increasing a CPU's performance these days, but after many years hanging out in the 5 GHz range, it's neat to hit the next digit. As for what this means for performance, Intel is saying that Raptor Lake will perform roughly 15 percent better in single-threaded tasks and 41 percent better in multi-threaded workloads than the current 12th-generation Alder Lake chips. Clock speed is more important for boosting single-threaded performance, while adding more cores is usually the best way to improve multi-threaded speeds. It's not clear which of the CPUs will be capable of hitting 6 GHz or under what circumstances or for how long. An Intel SKU chart published by Igor's Lab suggests that the Core i9-13900K will top out at 5.8 GHz, though it's possible that it's capable of further boosting beyond that. A purported SKU chart for the 13th-gen chips doesn't mention the 6 GHz limit, but boosting works in mysterious ways. Igor's Lab The SKU chart also confirms what we've heard from other leaks—despite an architectural similarity to current Alder Lake CPUs, Intel is boosting performance by doubling the maximum number of E-cores in its top-tier CPUs, from eight to 16. The i5-12600K, which included four E-cores, will also be replaced by a Core i5-13600K that includes eight. And if the rest of that leaked desktop CPU lineup holds true, some lower-end Core i5 processors that shipped with no E-cores in the 12th generation will get four or eight in the 13th generation. This SKU chart also indicates that these top-end Raptor Lake CPUs will include other changes, including increased amounts of L2 and L3 cache available. It also looks like the Maximum Turbo Power consumption of all the chips is going up by between 12 W and 63 W—from 241 W to 253 W for the Core i9, from 190 W to 253 W for the Core i7, and from 150 W to 181 W for the Core i5. The base power for all the chips stays level, at 125 W. Those maximum power consumption numbers don't necessarily mean that all Raptor Lake CPUs will consume more power than their Alder Lake counterparts—that will depend on the specific power settings that your motherboard or PC manufacturer chooses to use. It does mean that a Raptor Lake CPU with high power limits and adequate cooling will need more power and better cooling than a similarly configured Alder Lake CPU when running sustained workloads, though. People old enough to remember installing Windows 98 will recall that clock speed bragging rights were a big deal in the early 2000s. Intel planned to boost its Pentium 4 CPUs from the mid-1 GHz range all the way up to 10 GHz by 2005, but the architecture was just barely able to hit 4 GHz before heat and power consumption both became so high that further increases became untenable (the company's first attempt at a 4 GHz CPU never saw the light of day). The clock speed wars are back as Intel brags about hitting 6 GHz with 13th-gen CPUs
  21. Intel has released its first-ever WDDM 3.1 driver for its 11th Gen and 12th Gen processors with version 31.0.101.3616. Alongside WDDM 3.1, the new Windows DCH driver also fixes several bugs in some of the most popular titles currently which include Marvel's Spider-Man Remastered and Stray. Though plenty of open issues still remain. The full changelog is given below: FIXED ISSUES: Stray* (DX12) may experience an application crash or error message during gameplay. Vampire The Masquerade Blood Hunt* (DX12) may exhibit an application crash during game launch. Marvel’s Spider-Man* (DX12) may exhibit lighting corruption when looking towards the Sun. Marvel’s Spider-Man* (DX12) may exhibit a soft lock when attempting to take a picture of the Empire State Building. Marvel’s Spider-Man* (DX12) may exhibit missing lens flare effects with certain light sources. KNOWN ISSUES: Counter-Strike: Global Offensive* (DX9) may experience a game crash when changing shadow quality settings in game. Destiny 2* may exhibit display signal loss or display flashing during gameplay when HDR is enabled. Stranger of Paradise: Final Fantasy Origin* may experience an application crash during gameplay An “Update driver” pop-up error message may be observed when launching Battlefield 1* after upgrading from 30.0.100.9955 or older drivers. [12th Generation Intel Core Processors]: Red Dead Redemption 2* (Vulkan) may experience an application crash when performing an ALT+TAB to desktop. Color corruption may be observed in Total War: Warhammer III within the “realm of chaos” environment. Lighting corruption may be observed in the Halo Infinite* (DX12) multiplayer menus. Grid Legends* (DX12) may experience lighting corruption when lighting quality is set to high in the games settings. CrossFire HD* (DX9) may experience an application crash when task switching during gameplay. Chorus* may experience an application crash in some interior areas of the game such as the ship hangar. Sniper Elite 5* (DX12) may experience a game crash or TDR with an error dialog pop-up message. Red Dead Redemption 2* (DX12) may experience lower than expected performance when the game API is set to DirectX®12 with VSync enabled. [11th and 12th Generation Intel Core Processors]: Minor graphical anomalies may be seen in Gears 5* (DX12). A game crash or hang may occur when changing resolution in NBA 2K21* (DX12). [11th Generation Intel Core Processors with Intel Iris Xe graphics]: Minor graphical anomalies may be seen in Elex* (DX11), MechWarrior 5: Mercenaries* (DX12), Strange Brigade* (DX12) and The Ascent* (DX12) The new 31.0.101.3616 beta driver is compatible with all products based on Xe LP, ie, Intel 11th Gen and newer processors as well as Iris Xe desktop card (DG1). To download the driver, head over to Intel's official website via this link. Intel issues first WDDM 3.1 beta driver 31.0.101.3616 for 11th and 12th Gen chips
  22. Intel CEO Pat Gelsinger praised the CHIPS and Science Act President Joe Biden traveled to Ohio on Friday to celebrate the groundbreaking of Intel’s new $20 billion semiconductor plant, one of the first domestic chip-making facilities to come out of the recently passed CHIPS and Science Act. Intel’s Friday groundbreaking ceremony kicked off construction of what the company has called the “largest silicon manufacturing location on the planet.” It’s part of Intel’s plans to invest $100 billion in Ohio over the next 10 years. The company has said that the project could take more than 7,000 workers to build the facility that is expected to house two separate factories and, once finished, employ 3,000 workers. Intel had previously delayed the plant’s July groundbreaking ceremony because its plans largely relied “on funding from the CHIPS Act,” which Congress had yet to pass. But after a summer of negotiations, Biden signed the $280 billion tech and science bill last month, calling it “a once in a generation investment in America itself.” The bipartisan deal to boost American innovation in opposition to growing Chinese competition in the tech industry hopes to protect US economic and national security interests following a global semiconductor shortage. The start of the coronavirus pandemic in 2020 fractured global chip supply chains, making it more difficult for device makers to source semiconductors for their products. At the same time, demand for these goods surged as offices closed and people started working from home. “As we saw during the pandemic, when the factories that make these chips shut down, chips shut down. The global economy comes to a halt,” Biden said at the Intel site Friday. “We need to make these chips right here in America to bring down everyday costs and create good jobs.” Intel CEO Pat Gelsinger joined Biden for the ceremony he said marked the end of the Rust Belt and the beginnings of a “Silicon Heartland.” Other major chip manufacturers have announced plans for new domestic semiconductor facilities following the bill’s passage. Earlier this month, Micron said that it would invest $15 billion to build a new plant in Idaho. On Friday, Wolfspeed announced a $5 billion investment to build a new semiconductor facility in North Carolina. “Today we broke ground on a future that every Ohioan can be proud of,” Rep. Tim Ryan (D-OH), Ohio candidate for US Senate, said in a statement on Friday. “This multi-billion-dollar investment is a culmination of an unprecedented collaboration between federal, state, and private sector leaders that will transform Ohio’s economy and provide future generations an opportunity to build a stable middle-class life right here at home.” President Joe Biden speaks after groundbreaking for Intel’s $20 billion semiconductor plant
  23. Over the past few weeks, the Intel Arc marketing team has been sharing performance numbers for its Arc A750 graphics card. So far, these numbers have mainly consisted of rasterization and the card is shown to be somewhat comparable to the NVIDIA GeForce RTX 3060. Hence, it is fair to assume that Arc A750 will also be similar to the AMD Radeon RX 6600 and 6600 XT. Initially, Intel showed a five-game sample comparison but later, it published a 50-game sample covering several titles based on modern DirectX 12 and Vulkan APIs. In terms of ray tracing (DXR) performance, however, the more powerful A770 was pitted against the RTX 3060. In case you are wondering about the differences in specifications between the various Arc models, Intel today has shared the specs of the Arc desktop GPU line-up. A separate image detailing the specifications of the A750 and A770 Limited Edition cards has also been provided. Bizarrely, however, Intel has listed the entry level Arc A380 as featuring 4 GB memory instead of the 6 GB it actually has. You can see Intel's own Arc website lists the SKU as a 6 GB model: It is unlikely that the A380 model has undergone a memory configuration change, given how the card still features 186 GB/s memory (as you can see in the Arc website image above). For the card to suddenly become a 4 GB SKU, the memory interface must either be decreased or increased to 64-bit or 128-bit width, respectively. Either of these will also consecutively affect the memory bandwidth. Source: Intel Intel puts up video to clean up Arc confusion, ends up creating some more with wrong specs
  24. With Intel's 13th Gen Raptor Lake launch fast approaching according to leaked reports, there are plenty of other leaks trickling out here and there. Alleged details regarding the SKUs have also surfaced, initially in the form of just basic specifications, followed later with more in-depth details. Today, courtesy of igor'sLAB, the entire purported official presentation slide deck for the Raptor Lake-S launch has leaked. First up, we have a slide (left below) showing the basic comparison between the previous 12th Gen Alder Lake-S and the new 13th Gen Raptor Lake-S CPUs. The image on the right shows the SKU chart. Interestingly, although the slide only lists the a couple of SKUs each from the i9, i7 and i5 series, previous reports have indicated more lower power T SKUs are also in the works. The spec list also says that 253W will be the Maximum Turbo power for the i9 and i7 chips. However, rumors have suggested that Intel may go even higher with an alleged 350W Extreme performance mode. What's mostly new in today's leak are details regarding the upcoming Z790 chipset succeeding the previous Z690 chipset on the same socket LGA1700 platform. From the slide, it looks like Intel will be lowering the PCIe 3.0 lanes in 700-series boards. On Z790, there will be eight PCIe Gen3 lanes instead of 16 on Z690. Meanwhile, PCIe 4.0 lanes go up from 12 to 20. USB 3.2 Gen 2x2 is also apparently going to get a slight upgrade from four ports on Z690 up to five in the upcoming Z790. Source and images: igor'sLAB Purported Intel Raptor Lake official launch slides leak revealing specs, Z790 details
  25. AMD recently unveiled its Ryzen 7000 desktop CPU lineup based on Zen 4. To combat the new Zen chips, Intel will be releasing its 13th Gen Raptor Lake-S CPUs at the end of the month according to leaked information. It's going to be still competition between the two rival CPU lineups suggests leaked Geekbench performance numbers. As usual though, Intel's Raptor Lake-S lineup is expected to be a long one with several SKUs belonging to the i9, i7, i5 and i3 series. While an earlier leak gave us a pretty fair idea of that, a new report today from fellow site Wccftech alleges to have got in-depth specification details of the full Raptor Lake-S lineup including per core clock speed details, DDR4 and DDR5 supported speeds, among many other things. First up, we have the specs of the i9, i7 and i5 chips - both K (unlocked) and non-k (locked) - which will feature an Intel Xe LP integrated graphics. You can view the lineup in the image below. Interestingly it looks like DDR5 ECC support may be present on Raptor Lake right from the start. The 12th Gen Alder Lake CPUs had the feature enabled long after it had launched. Up next, we have the F-series SKUs which lack or have the integrated graphics disabled: Finally, we hae the T-series lineup that are low TDP variants. The T series apparently consists of only two variants, the i9-13900T and i7-13700T: With the expected launch of the Raptor Lake looming not too far away from now, we could receive even more details about the chips as we inch closer. Source and images: Wccftech More purported details on upcoming Intel Raptor Lake leaks: 13900K, 13700K and more
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