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  1. Surface your VIPs’ content to the top of your feed. You’re on Instagram looking for your best friend’s daily dog update, but you have to scroll endlessly through a sea of posts you care little about, and probably forget what you’re looking for in the first place. After a few extra annoyed scrolls, you close the app in frustration. It seems Instagram is well aware of your plight, because it is quietly testing out a solution for your messy feed called “Favorites.” According to Alessandro Paluzzi, a mobile developer who first posted about the new feature on Twitter, Favorites lets you categorize your most important Instagram accounts (friends and creators) as your priorities, so that their posts will land “higher” in your feed. If this feature sounds familiar, it’s because Instagram was testing a different Favorites feature back in 2017, which you let you limit the exact audience for each post. For example, you could share your wedding photo with just your designated favorites, rather than with your entire following. The 2021 iteration of Favorites, however, is about giving you more control over your feed — by telling Instagram which accounts are most important to you. After all, you may follow a bunch of different brands and creators on your account, but you don’t necessarily prioritize their content on the same level as your closest friends and families. Currently, Instagram ranks the order of your feed by the most recent and shared posts from the people you follow, plus other “signals” like how likely you’ll engage with a post, according to the company’s June 2021 blog post about its algorithm. While you may “like” many posts you see, those may not be the content you’re actually looking for, but might be sending Instagram all the wrong signals on what you actually want to see in your feed. It’s not clear whether this Favorites feature will become an official feature at all or if it will change before it’s rolled out more broadly. In the meantime, you just might see this feature in your account menu, just below “Close Friends” — a feature that lets you control who you share your Stories. We’ve reached out to Instagram for more information on this new feature and will update this article should the company respond. Instagram is testing new ‘Favorites’ to bring order to your chaotic feed
  2. Instagram really, really wants to know your birthday If you haven’t given Instagram your birthday, it’s about to start asking for it a whole lot more — and it’ll eventually be required for you to use the app. Instagram started requiring that new users add their birthdates in 2019, but if you had an older account, it was possible to skate by without providing that info. Now it seems that’ll become increasingly more difficult. According to the press release, Instagram will ask you for your birthday when you open the app, if you haven't already added it to your profile. You’ll be able to ignore it, but only up to a certain point — eventually, Instagram says, you’ll have to add your birthday if you want to keep using the app. Instagram also says that if it doesn’t have your birthday, it’ll ask for it before showing you posts that are marked as sensitive. It’s been blurring sensitive content for years, but now if you want to see it, your birthday will have to be on file with Instagram. Instagram will also ask your age before showing you sensitive content. Image: Instagram The company says these efforts are part of its work to make the platform safer for young people. In May, the company formally announced that it’s working on a version of Instagram for people younger than 13 — a feature that would obviously require the platform to know people’s ages. It’s also been working on other age protections, like making it so adults couldn’t DM minors who weren’t following them or by making accounts for people younger than 16 private by default. Instagram’s birthday support page also says it uses it to moderate ads. (For instance, people under 21 won’t get ads for alcohol.) The company says, in the future, it’ll use its age detection AI to sniff out people who are lying about their ages. In July, Facebook had a blog post about this tech, saying it was analyzing comments on your birthday posts, such as “happy 21st” or “happy Quinceañera.” According to its press release, if someone says they’re above a certain age like 13 or 18, but the AI says otherwise, Instagram will have them verify their age using a variety of methods (though it doesn’t say exactly what this will look like). Social networks have long asked you for your birthday, but having them required speaks to the growing need to make sure that kids are safe online and the feeling of invasiveness that can come with that. Snapchat users recently got a taste of the strangeness that can come when social networks have information you might not remember handing over: they discovered that the app knew the time and location they were born because they had given the info to Snapchat’s astrological profile feature — and then seemingly forgot that they’d done so. For Instagram users, though, this likely won’t be an issue. It’s going to be hard to miss the birthday information requests. You’ll have to tell Instagram your birthday to keep using the app
  3. Ads everywhere If you thought Instagram had run out of ad real estate, think again. The company confirmed to TechCrunch today that it’s starting a new test that’ll involve putting ads on its Shop tab. Ads will involve either a single image or carousel of them, and of course, will be shoppable. Only certain advertisers will have access at first, but there are plans to expand the product in the future. (Initial US-based partners include Away, Fenty Beauty, and Clare paint.) Of course, it’s no surprise Instagram is trying more ads in more places — that’s Instagram and its parent company Facebook’s main revenue driver. Earlier this year, Instagram officially rolled out ads in Reels, another new format that debuted only last year. The company also began testing sticker ads, which would allow people to include stickers in their stories advertising a product. Users will receive a cut of any revenue made through people tapping on the sticker and buying a product. Basically, if there’s unused space on Instagram, you should expect ads to show up there soon enough. It’s unclear how successful these ads are in driving purchases, but brands presumably will want to try it out regardless, if only to ensure their products are seen by Instagram’s billion users. Instagram is now testing ads in the Shop tab
  4. Instagram chief explains how the service decides what you see Adam Mosseri published the first in a new series of blogs Instagram chief Adam Mosseri shed some light on how the social network decides what you see in a new blog post published on Tuesday. The explanation seems to be meant at least in part to combat persistent rumors that Instagram intentionally hides or disfavors certain posts, which Instagram says isn’t exactly true. The short answer to how Instagram works is that it’s complicated. Instagram uses “thousands” of signals to determine what you see in your feed, according to Mosseri, and there isn’t just one algorithm that decides what shows up for you. But the company is also committed to better explaining why content is taken down and how the service surfaces posts, he writes. One of the more surprising revelations: most Instagram followers won’t see your posts anyway because “most people look at less than half of their Feed.” Tuesday’s blog is just the first of a series that “will shed more light on how Instagram’s technology works and how it impacts the experiences that people have across the app,” for example, so it seems we can expect more detailed breakdowns in the future. In this first blog, Mosseri explained that Instagram uses “a variety of algorithms, classifiers, and processes, each with its own purpose” to determine what to show you. He then broke down the “signals” Instagram uses to surface something in your feed or in stories. Here are the “most important” signals, “roughly in order of importance:” Information about the post. These are signals both about how popular a post is – think how many people have liked it – and more mundane information about the content itself, like when it was posted, how long it is if it’s a video, and what location, if any, was attached to it. Information about the person who posted. This helps us get a sense for how interesting the person might be to you, and includes signals like how many times people have interacted with that person in the past few weeks. Your activity. This helps us understand what you might be interested in and includes signals such as how many posts you’ve liked. Your history of interacting with someone. This gives us a sense of how interested you are generally in seeing posts from a particular person. An example is whether or not you comment on each other’s posts. Instagram will then predict how you might interact with a post, such as commenting or liking it. “The more likely you are to take an action, and the more heavily we weigh that action, the higher up you’ll see the post,” Mosseri said. Mosseri also addressed how people accuse the service of silencing or “shadowbanning” users and said the company will do a better job of explaining why content is removed. “We’re developing better in-app notifications so people know in the moment why, for instance, their post was taken down, and exploring ways to let people know when what they post goes against our Recommendations Guidelines,” Mosseri said. Instagram will have “more to share soon” on those updates. The blog post also details the signals the company uses to show you content in the Explore tab and on Reels (Instagram’s TikTok-like video service) — which, notably, primarily show you content from accounts you don’t follow. Mosseri’s explanation hits as Instagram is kicking off its Creator Week event, designed to help creators build their brands on the platform. Instagram chief explains how the service decides what you see
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  6. Instagram Lite reboot squeezes the app into a 2MB package It's being released to Android devices in 170 countries from today. Facebook / Instagram Facebook is today relaunching Instagram Lite, a stripped-down version of the image-sharing app designed for users in emerging markets. Developed by Facebook’s team in Tel Aviv, the birthplace of Facebook Lite and Messenger Lite, the app’s package size is just 2MB. The team said that the focus, like with the other launches, was on users whose smartphones lack storage capacity, processing power and reliable data. In order to reach that size, the app focuses on images, video and messaging, ditching other features and flourishes that fade into the background on the full-fat version of the app. Instagram Lite still has the main feed, as well as Stories — the ephemeral messaging feature cribbed from Snapchat — but not IG Live or Shopping. Engineering manager Gal Zellermayer said that, as well as live filters and other AR effects that wouldn’t work on low-power devices, animations have been edited down. He cited the example of the cube animation seen when swiping between different users’ Stories, a very processor and data-intensive transition that didn’t work well on older devices, which has been removed. Zellermayer added that a lot of extra compression work is handled on the server side to relieve the burden off the device itself. Michelle Lourie, product manager, explained that there were a number of additional UI tweaks to better suit “new digital users.” This included ditching a trash can to represent a delete icon, in favor of an X, which testers found made more sense. In addition, Lourie said that GIFs and Stickers remain part of the app since, unlike AR filters, they were space efficient while remaining fun. Lourie added that the team is currently working on Dark Mode, a feature that users were requesting long before the app was released. The first version of Instagram Lite was little more than a wrapper around a web app. Facebook shut it down that version in May 2020, and at the time said that it was working on a new version with better on-device support. This new edition has been in testing in several territories already, but is today rolling out to Google Play in 170 countries around the world. Source: Instagram Lite reboot squeezes the app into a 2MB package
  7. Instagram just threw users of its embedding API under the bus People may need to get permission before embedding someone else's Instagram photo. Enlarge Aurich Lawson 36 with 29 posters participating, including story author Instagram does not provide users of its embedding API a copyright license to display embedded images on other websites, the company said in a Thursday email to Ars Technica. The announcement could come as an unwelcome surprise to users who believed that embedding images, rather than hosting them directly, provides insulation against copyright claims. "While our terms allow us to grant a sub-license, we do not grant one for our embeds API," a Facebook company spokesperson told Ars in a Thursday email. "Our platform policies require third parties to have the necessary rights from applicable rights holders. This includes ensuring they have a license to share this content, if a license is required by law." In plain English, before you embed someone's Instagram post on your website, you may need to ask the poster for a separate license to the images in the post. If you don't, you could be subject to a copyright lawsuit. Professional photographers are likely to cheer the decision, since it will strengthen their hand in negotiations with publishers. But it could also significantly change the culture of the Web. Until now, people have generally felt free to embed Instagram posts on their own sites without worrying about copyright concerns. That might be about to change. Two lawsuits, different results Newsweek recently found this out the hard way. Photographer Elliot McGucken took a rare photo (perhaps this one) of an ephemeral lake in Death Valley. Ordinarily, Death Valley is bone dry, but occasionally a heavy rain will create a sizable body of water. Newsweek asked to license the image, but McGucken turned down their offer. So instead Newsweek embedded a post from McGucken's Instagram feed containing the image. McGucken sued for copyright infringement, arguing that he hadn't given Newsweek permission to use the photo. Newsweek countered that it didn't need McGucken's permission because it could get rights indirectly via Instagram. Instagram's terms of service require anyone uploading photos to provide a copyright license to Instagram—including the right to sublicense the same rights to other users. Newsweek argued that that license extends to users of Instagram's embedding technology, like Newsweek. Newsweek had reason to be optimistic about this argument because Mashable won a very similar case in April. The judge in the Mashable case ruled that photographer Stephanie Sinclair "granted Instagram the right to sublicense the photograph, and Instagram validly exercised that right by granting Mashable a sublicense to display the photograph." But in a surprise ruling on Monday, Judge Katherine Failla refused to dismiss McGucken's lawsuit at a preliminary stage. She held that there wasn't enough evidence in the record to decide whether Instagram's terms of service provided a copyright license for embedded photos. Instagram’s bombshell Now Instagram has dropped another bombshell that throws the entire premise of Newsweek's defense into doubt. "Wow. That is going to blow up the Sinclair case," Cornell copyright scholar James Grimmelmann wrote after I shared Instagram's comment with him. By stating outright that users of its embedding feature don't get licenses from Instagram to display photos, Instagram is preventing future defendants from using Mashable's argument. It will be hard for Newsweek to convince a judge that it had a sublicense from Instagram when Instagram has explicitly claimed the opposite. Instagram tells Ars that it's exploring the possibility of giving users more control over photograph embedding. Right now, Instagram users can block embedding of their posts by switching their Instagram account to private. But that will also prevent users on the Instagram platform from seeing their content, too, which can be a career liability for professional photographers. Right now, Instagram offers no option to make content public inside the Instagram app while disabling embedding on external websites. Kim Almazan, a copyright litigator at the law firm of Withers Worldwide, argues that the safest route is for media companies to ask photographers for permission before embedding their work in news articles—and to use another photo if the photographer says no. The “server test” is more important than ever Newsweek has a couple of other legal options. Newsweek claimed fair use, but Judge Failla seemed skeptical of this argument in Monday's ruling. Grimmelmann pointed to another argument Newsweek might raise: that Instagram—not Newsweek—was the distributor of the photograph. An embedded Instagram post is actually a bit of code that instructs the user's browser to fetch the contents of a post—such as McGucken's photograph—directly from Instagram's servers. In the past, courts have ruled against plaintiffs in embedding cases based on the "server test," which holds that liability goes to whomever runs the server that actually delivers infringing content to the user—in this case, Instagram. This argument is binding law in the 9th Circuit, which includes California (and therefore covers a lot of technology companies). Appeals courts in most other circuits haven't ruled on the question one way or the other. A federal trial judge in New York rejected the server test 2018, creating a worrying precedent for defendants. But because it was only a trial court ruling, it wasn't binding on other judges. Instagram's decision to throw users of its embedding API under the bus makes the server test crucial for cases like this. If the server test is adopted outside the 9th Circuit, it could provide a legal basis for the continued use of embedded Instagram posts. On the other hand, if the 2nd Circuit—which covers New York—ultimately rejects the server test, then it would become legally hazardous to use Instagram embeds without a separate copyright license. Grimmelmann notes that Facebook's statement is "studiously noncommittal" about whether the server test is the law. At this point, Newsweek's best chance is likely to be to raise a server test defense. Eventually, the case may make its way to the 2nd Circuit Appeals Court, which will have to decide whether it wants to follow 9th Circuit precedent—which could make it a de facto national standard—or reject the server test and throw the legality of embedding into doubt nationwide. Instagram just threw users of its embedding API under the bus
  8. Instagram may be planning to charge a fee to put links in captions, patent suggests The patent application shows a pop-up that asks for a payment when a link is added to a caption Illustration by Alex Castro / The Verge Influencers, brace yourselves: Instagram may be considering charging a fee to add links to photo captions, a patent application suggests. Mike Murphy discovered it as part of his (fascinating!) weekly roundup of tech patents over at Protocol. The patent application, which Instagram parent company Facebook first submitted back in 2016, shows a pop-up appearing when the user adds a URL to a caption, asking if the user wants to pay $2 to make the link live. The patent application (titled “adding paid links to media captions in a social networking system”) describes how the system would work: “If the online system detects the text content of the caption includes a string of link text identifying an address, the online system prompts the posting user to pay a fee in exchange for generating a link.” This, of course, has long been one of the biggest complaints about Instagram: that if you want to include a link to a story, product, or anything else in your post you can’t add URLs to captions of photos. Most people go the “link in bio” route, and verified Insta users can add links to Stories. The question here will be whether Instagram influencers, brands, and other users will be willing to pay a per-link fee. But it seems like a no-brainer to generate revenue for Instagram if this goes into effect. However, as with any patent, it’s important to note that companies apply for patents all the time for products and services that never come to fruition, so there’s no telling if or when this feature might actually happen. Maybe don’t splurge on that new selfie stick just yet. Instagram may be planning to charge a fee to put links in captions, patent suggests
  9. Facebook is being sued by an Instagram user who claims the social media giant spied on users through their iPhone cameras. Brittany Conditi, who filed the lawsuit, said Facebook accessed Instagram users’ cameras even when they weren’t taking pictures or videos. Users first noticed a green FaceTime symbol appear on their phones when they were scrolling through their Instagram news feeds in July. Facebook has denied spying, and blamed a bug. Facebook is being sued over claims it spied on Instagram users through their iPhone cameras. The social-media giant has denied the claims, and blamed a bug that it said triggered false notifications that Instagram was accessing iPhone cameras. In July, users noticed that a green FaceTime symbol was showing up when they scrolled through their Instagram feed, per the Independent. The symbol appears on iPhones when the camera is on. The lawsuit, filed on Thursday by Instagram user Brittany Conditi, claims that Facebook's intentional access of the camera allows the app to collect "lucrative and valuable data on its users that it would not otherwise have access to," Bloomberg reported. Instagram and Facebook can collect "valuable insights and market research" by "obtaining extremely private and intimate personal data on their users, including in the privacy of their own homes," the complaint says. Conditi filed the lawsuit in a San Francisco federal court. Facebook did not immediately respond for a comment when contacted by Business Insider. The accusation follows allegations that Facebook illegally holds more than 100 million Instagram users' biometric data. The social media company offered to pay $650 million in July to settle a lawsuit that accused it of collecting data through the photo-tagging tool available on the app. In November, users accused Facebook of accessing iPhone cameras through the Facebook app. A Facebook spokesperson told CNN that the bug was "inadvertently introduced" and promised to fix the issue. Source
  10. NinjaGram v7.6.4.2 NinjaGram (Instagram bot) What makes NinjaGram so special? Auto-follow: Mass follow targeted Instagram users, from any location in Instagram (search results, your feed, another user’s followers, or pictures taken at a particular location (NEW)!) Auto-unfollow: Mass unfollow users with various settings, such as only those who don’t follow you back or only users followed more than X days ago. Auto-like: Mass like thousands of other finely targeted and filtered images on Instagram with the click of a button. Auto-like your own feed, monitor a tag, or images from anywhere in Instagram. Auto-comment: Automatically leave comments from a preset list on your targeted photos. Spintax allowed! Superlike feature: Target users and like their recent photos (you can specify how many). Extremely effective method to gain more followers. Much more effective than just liking a single photo! Auto-view stories: Automatically view the stories of other targeted accounts or monitor for new stories to view. Run this regularly! Targeting filters: Filter users by number of followers, followings, posts, bio keywords, active stories, businesses, verified accounts and more. Filter pictures by number of likes, age and keywords. Monitoring: Monitor a tag or location search and automatically like new pictures or follow users immediately. This ensures you are targeting only active users! Auto-accept requests: If your account is set to private, then your follow requests can accumulate drastically. With NinjaGram you can automatically accept all your pending follower requests in one go! Track usage and growth: All usage data is tracked and charted. See which of your stategies are the most effective over time. Targeting options: Target another user’s followers or follows, tag search, users who liked or commented on a particular post, a specified location, your feed and users found on a Google search, Multiple simultaneous actions: Follow, like, comment and view stories simultaneously, each with their own time delay settings. Location search: Automatically like pictures taken at a certain location, or follow users posting from a location. Image resizer: NinjaGram includes a general purpose image resizer. Resize any image(s) to custom dimensions for posting on Instagram or anywhere else! Account protection: Use a random time delay setting as well as “breaks” at intervals to stay under the radar and avoid getting flagged for spamming. Proxy support: Although not strictly necessary, you can hide your IP if you feel the need. Private proxies are also supported. Blacklist/whitelist: Avoid unfollowing your own known friends, or following, commenting, etc. certain people you would like to avoid. Import/Export ID's: Have a third-party list of users you want to follow? No problem! You can also export the usernames or photo ID’s to a text file to process elsewhere. Top notch support: We strive to answer all messages within 24 hours (weekdays) and deliver regular updates to keep the software running bug-free. Multiple accounts: Perform all these actions on one account, or use multiple accounts simultaneously. >HomePage< >More Info< Trial Version: http://ninjapinner.com/download/setup_ng.exe Re-Packed Full Version by yaschir:
  11. NinjaGram v7.6.4.9 NinjaGram (Instagram bot) What makes NinjaGram so special? Auto-follow: Mass follow targeted Instagram users, from any location in Instagram (search results, your feed, another user’s followers, or pictures taken at a particular location (NEW)!) Auto-unfollow: Mass unfollow users with various settings, such as only those who don’t follow you back or only users followed more than X days ago. Auto-like: Mass like thousands of other finely targeted and filtered images on Instagram with the click of a button. Auto-like your own feed, monitor a tag, or images from anywhere in Instagram. Auto-comment: Automatically leave comments from a preset list on your targeted photos. Spintax allowed! Superlike feature: Target users and like their recent photos (you can specify how many). Extremely effective method to gain more followers. Much more effective than just liking a single photo! Auto-view stories: Automatically view the stories of other targeted accounts or monitor for new stories to view. Run this regularly! Targeting filters: Filter users by number of followers, followings, posts, bio keywords, active stories, businesses, verified accounts and more. Filter pictures by number of likes, age and keywords. Monitoring: Monitor a tag or location search and automatically like new pictures or follow users immediately. This ensures you are targeting only active users! Auto-accept requests: If your account is set to private, then your follow requests can accumulate drastically. With NinjaGram you can automatically accept all your pending follower requests in one go! Track usage and growth: All usage data is tracked and charted. See which of your stategies are the most effective over time. Targeting options: Target another user’s followers or follows, tag search, users who liked or commented on a particular post, a specified location, your feed and users found on a Google search, Multiple simultaneous actions: Follow, like, comment and view stories simultaneously, each with their own time delay settings. Location search: Automatically like pictures taken at a certain location, or follow users posting from a location. Image resizer: NinjaGram includes a general purpose image resizer. Resize any image(s) to custom dimensions for posting on Instagram or anywhere else! Account protection: Use a random time delay setting as well as “breaks” at intervals to stay under the radar and avoid getting flagged for spamming. Proxy support: Although not strictly necessary, you can hide your IP if you feel the need. Private proxies are also supported. Blacklist/whitelist: Avoid unfollowing your own known friends, or following, commenting, etc. certain people you would like to avoid. Import/Export ID's: Have a third-party list of users you want to follow? No problem! You can also export the usernames or photo ID’s to a text file to process elsewhere. Top notch support: We strive to answer all messages within 24 hours (weekdays) and deliver regular updates to keep the software running bug-free. Multiple accounts: Perform all these actions on one account, or use multiple accounts simultaneously. >HomePage< >More Info< Trial Version: http://ninjapinner.com/download/setup_ng.exe Re-Packed Full Version by yaschir:
  12. Facebook Merges DMs for Instagram and Messenger A new update allows for cross-platform messaging for the first time within the Facebook family of apps. Courtesy of Instagram One of the last major firewalls standing between Facebook’s family of apps is no more: Starting today, Instagram users can message people on Facebook, and vice versa. How? Messenger, the Facebook-owned messaging app, has slid into Instagram’s DMs. An update replaces direct messages on Instagram with Messenger, which will be embedded inside the app. No need to download the Messenger app separately, as the Facebook app still requires; no need to link your Facebook account, or even have a Facebook account at all. The update is a significant step toward a vision laid out by Mark Zuckerberg last year of knitting together the messaging systems on Facebook, Instagram, and WhatsApp, which between them have over 2.6 billion users. “We want to give people a choice so they can reach their friends across these networks from whichever app they prefer,” the CEO wrote at the time. In addition to convenience, he touted the security and privacy advantages—namely, end-to-end encryption, which has been the default on WhatsApp since 2016. End-to-end encryption is also part of what makes merging the platforms so tricky. Facebook engineers told WIRED earlier this year that making encryption the default on Messenger will take years—and so, by extension, will a full integration of all three apps. Adam Mosseri, the head of Instagram, confirmed that full end-to-end encryption remains on the company’s map, but did not say when it will get there. Wednesday’s update introduces some other privacy features in the meantime. A new “Vanish mode” lets you make messages disappear, modeled after ephemeral messaging platforms like Snapchat. The “vanishing” messages are not encrypted; Instagram says it will retain them for reporting purposes. Facebook Messenger also has a disappearing messages option, called Secret conversations, but that feature allows individual messages to be encrypted. There are at least a few new features designed to keep Instagram and Facebook friends separate: You can choose not to receive messages from people on Facebook, for example, and can choose not to link the accounts at all. Nor does the update combine inboxes—messages on Instagram will remain in the Instagram app, while messages on the stand-alone Messenger app will stay there. Threads, Instagram’s stand-alone messaging app for close friends and family, remains unchanged. Facebook, for its part, sees this consolidation as a way to maintain standards across all of its platforms. Its work on “integrity,” which involves managing the risk of election interference and misinformation, will carry over from Facebook’s Messenger to the new Messenger on Instagram. Message forwarding, one of the new updates on Instagram, will have the same limits that Facebook introduced for Messenger earlier this month. And the same tools to report suspicious activity or block unwanted messages will now be available on both apps. Other new messaging features—there are 10 total—are designed to make it easier to talk to people, whether they’re connected to you on Instagram or on Facebook. There’s a way to send “selfie stickers,” similar to the messaging app Line. You can send emoji reactions and reply to specific messages, as on iMessage. “There are a lot of basic features that have been missing for a long time,” says Mosseri. Mosseri says the upgrades should make Instagram more of a destination for chatting with friends. Right now, people think of the app as a place to share photos, follow influencers, or shop for clothes, rather than a messaging space. By injecting Messenger’s features into the app, Mosseri says, “we can give people a more compelling experience to help us compete, particularly in the US, where we feel like we're behind.” Advertisement I asked Mosseri who Instagram sees as its main competition. The answers were numerous: iMessage in the United States, Kakao Talk in Korea, Line in Japan. Among the privacy-conscious it’s Signal. Among teenagers it’s Snapchat. That Instagram wants to overtake almost every popular messaging app around the world makes sense: Instagram, like Facebook, makes money from time spent on its apps, and the ads it can show to people during that time. If it can siphon all the time spent texting on iMessage over to the Instagram app, it stands to profit hugely. And the company’s enormous ambitions show no sign of letting up in the face of multiple investigations—by the Federal Trade Commission, by the House of Representatives—into potential antitrust concerns. Earlier this year, Congress grilled Zuckerberg on Facebook’s acquisition of Instagram, with one representative calling it “exactly the type of anticompetitive acquisition the antitrust laws were designed to prevent.” Ever since that deal, in 2012, the two apps have looked more and more alike. When Instagram introduced Stories, Facebook followed suit. Instagram adopted an algorithmic feed to look more like Facebook. The trend has accelerated since Instagram’s founders left and were replaced by Mosseri, a longtime Facebooker, who has overseen the rebranding of the app as, literally, “Instagram by Facebook.” As lawmakers, critics, and even former executives call for the two to divorce, Instagram and Facebook seem more happily married than ever. Facebook Merges DMs for Instagram and Messenger
  13. NinjaGram v7.6.4.0 NinjaGram (Instagram bot) What makes NinjaGram so special? Auto-follow: Mass follow targeted Instagram users, from any location in Instagram (search results, your feed, another user’s followers, or pictures taken at a particular location (NEW)!) Auto-unfollow: Mass unfollow users with various settings, such as only those who don’t follow you back or only users followed more than X days ago. Auto-like: Mass like thousands of other finely targeted and filtered images on Instagram with the click of a button. Auto-like your own feed, monitor a tag, or images from anywhere in Instagram. Auto-comment: Automatically leave comments from a preset list on your targeted photos. Spintax allowed! Superlike feature: Target users and like their recent photos (you can specify how many). Extremely effective method to gain more followers. Much more effective than just liking a single photo! Auto-view stories: Automatically view the stories of other targeted accounts or monitor for new stories to view. Run this regularly! Targeting filters: Filter users by number of followers, followings, posts, bio keywords, active stories, businesses, verified accounts and more. Filter pictures by number of likes, age and keywords. Monitoring: Monitor a tag or location search and automatically like new pictures or follow users immediately. This ensures you are targeting only active users! Auto-accept requests: If your account is set to private, then your follow requests can accumulate drastically. With NinjaGram you can automatically accept all your pending follower requests in one go! Track usage and growth: All usage data is tracked and charted. See which of your stategies are the most effective over time. Targeting options: Target another user’s followers or follows, tag search, users who liked or commented on a particular post, a specified location, your feed and users found on a Google search, Multiple simultaneous actions: Follow, like, comment and view stories simultaneously, each with their own time delay settings. Location search: Automatically like pictures taken at a certain location, or follow users posting from a location. Image resizer: NinjaGram includes a general purpose image resizer. Resize any image(s) to custom dimensions for posting on Instagram or anywhere else! Account protection: Use a random time delay setting as well as “breaks” at intervals to stay under the radar and avoid getting flagged for spamming. Proxy support: Although not strictly necessary, you can hide your IP if you feel the need. Private proxies are also supported. Blacklist/whitelist: Avoid unfollowing your own known friends, or following, commenting, etc. certain people you would like to avoid. Import/Export ID's: Have a third-party list of users you want to follow? No problem! You can also export the usernames or photo ID’s to a text file to process elsewhere. Top notch support: We strive to answer all messages within 24 hours (weekdays) and deliver regular updates to keep the software running bug-free. Multiple accounts: Perform all these actions on one account, or use multiple accounts simultaneously. >HomePage< >More Info< Trial Version: http://ninjapinner.com/download/setup_ng.exe Re-Packed Full Version by yaschir:
  14. Instagram launches Reels, its attempt to keep you off TikTok ‘No two products are exactly alike, and ours are not either’ WithWith TikTok’s future uncertain, Instagram is hoping to lure some creators away with the rollout of a direct competitor, Reels, which is launching in more than 50 countries today, including the US, UK, Japan, and Australia, on both iOS and Android. Similar to TikTok, Reels lets people create short-form videos set to music that can be shared with friends and followers and discovered while browsing the app. It’s the newest opportunity for Instagram to bring in users, increase the amount of time people spend in the app every day, and establish itself as a video entertainment platform. Reels allows people to record videos up to 15 seconds long and add popular music, as well as an array of filters and effects, over top of them. For creators looking to use Instagram Reels as a new way to build a following, Instagram has revamped its Explore page to create a specific landing spot for Reels at the top of the screen that people can vertically scroll through — similar to TikTok’s “For You Page.” Both private and public options are available. If you want to become the next Charli D’Amelio, having a public profile will allow your Reels to be widely discovered. For people who want to share with friends, Reels created under private accounts will only post to a person’s Feed and Stories. The feature lives entirely inside of Instagram; it’s not a new app. The launch of Reels comes as TikTok faces a potential ban in the United States by President Donald Trump or a possible partial acquisition by Microsoft. ByteDance also said Sunday that Facebook was among the troubles in its path, accusing the company of plagiarizing its product with Instagram Reels. Robby Stein, Instagram’s product director, said that while TikTok popularized the short video format, the two products are different. “I think TikTok deserves a ton of credit for popularizing formats in this space, and it’s just great work,” Stein told The Verge. “But at the end of the day, no two products are exactly alike, and ours are not either.” That’s a familiar line to people who remember when Instagram first launched Stories in 2016, and the company was accused of creating a Snapchat clone. Stein said that his team received “very similar feedback when we launched Stories.” But Instagram Stories quickly surpassed Snapchat in daily users and has continued to be a massively successful product. That history of success is one of the strongest reasons for Instagram’s team to think it can pull Reels off. TikTok did it first, but maybe Instagram can do it better. Part of that strategy is focusing on what Stein believes Instagram does best: creating easy-to-use technology for whoever wants to make a video. When opening Instagram to make a Reel, people will be able to slide to a new section of the camera that comes with an assortment of tools. Reels can be recorded either all at once or as a series of clips, or people can upload videos from their photo gallery. The camera’s new features are similar to TikTok’s, with options to mess with the speed, apply special effects, set a timer, and add audio. Instagram’s product team is “really positioning Instagram camera around a few core formats,” according to Stein. Stories is designed as more of a social feature — quick little snippets people want to share with their followers. Reels is designed with entertainment in mind, an area that Instagram wants to really focus on. Part of that focus includes the redesign of Instagram’s Explore page. More than 50 percent of people use Instagram’s Explore page in a month, Stein said, and now there’ll be a dedicated hub for Reels. This is essentially Reels’ equivalent of the “For You Page” on TikTok, a place for creators to possibly go viral or find new followers. “We’re going big with entertainment and [making Explore] the permanent place for you to go lean back, relax, and be inspired every day,” Stein said. “It’s our hope that with this format we have a new chapter of entertainment on Instagram.” Reels’ biggest difference from TikTok is its tie-ins to the overarching Instagram ecosystem, Stein says. People can send Reels to their friends directly on Instagram and they can use Instagram-specific AR filters and tools — everything that people want to do is part of an existing network. TikTok and Instagram are more than camera products, though. They’re communities for established and burgeoning creators. Stein said the company’s main goal is to “support the entire creator ecosystem,” including giving creators the ability to scale their reach on the platform and adding new tools to make their videos pop. For now, though, Instagram won’t be paying popular creators for their videos, as TikTok has started to offer. Instagram already allows for influencers and creators to earn revenue through brand deals and sponsored posts, but Instagram doesn’t directly pay people for content. TikTok didn’t either until very recently. The company announced last month that it’s starting a $200 million fund in the US to pay top creators for their videos. TikTok is hoping to expand that fund north of $1 billion. The message is simple: we want you to stay on TikTok and create for TikTok, and we’re going to pay you to do it. Stein had “nothing to share” for now about direct payments to creators, but he stressed that allowing people to monetize is important. There are a few other features that Reels will not have at launch. People won’t be able to “duet” with each other — a core TikTok feature that lets people interact with, build upon, and remix videos. Instagram also won’t allow people to upload songs directly into the app’s system. Musicians looking to use the app as a place to make a song go viral “can add original audio by just recording and that can live on later,” Stein said, adding that “other people could use it and remix it,” but the actual song can’t be uploaded directly. Reels isn’t its own world like TikTok is or Vine was. It’s another thing to do on Instagram and another way to find entertainment beyond scrolling through Stories and our Feeds. That lack of focus might seem like a weakness, but Stein sees it differently. “I think one of the really fun parts of this,” he says, “is it’s just another format on Instagram.” Instagram launches Reels, its attempt to keep you off TikTo
  15. Facebook begins merging Instagram and Messenger chats in new update You might see this pop-up when you open Instagram Facebook appears to flipping the switch on integrating the chat systems for Instagram and Messenger. On Friday evening, several editors at The Verge across the country — on both iOS and Android devices — noticed an update screen popped up in Instagram’s mobile app with the message “There’s a New Way to Message on Instagram” with a list of features including a “new colorful look for your chats,” more emoji reactions, swipe-to-reply, and the big one: “chat with friends who use Facebook.” Once you hit update, the regular DM icon in the top right of Instagram is replaced by the Facebook Messenger logo. Chats on Instagram are indeed more colorful than before, with the sender’s messages shifting between blue and purple as you scroll. However, at least for right now, it’s still not possible to message Facebook users from Instagram. But Facebook has made clear its plans to unify the messaging platforms of its hugely popular apps to allow cross-messaging among Messenger, Instagram, and WhatsApp. Facebook was said to be rebuilding the underlying infrastructure so users who were on only one of its apps could connect to others using different Facebook apps. Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg has also said he wants the system to be end-to-end encrypted. By integrating its most popular apps, Facebook may be able to compete more directly with Apple’s iMessage. Facebook acquired Instagram for $1 billion in 2012, and bought WhatsApp in 2014 for $19 billion. The company did not immediately reply to a request for comment Friday evening. Facebook begins merging Instagram and Messenger chats in new update
  16. yaschir

    NinjaGram v7.6.3.3

    NinjaGram v7.6.3.3 (Instagram bot) What makes NinjaGram so special? Auto-follow Mass follow targeted Instagram users, from any location in Instagram (search results, your feed, another user’s followers, or pictures taken at a particular location (NEW)!) Auto-unfollow Mass unfollow users with various settings, such as only those who don’t follow you back or only users followed more than X days ago. Auto-like Mass like thousands of other finely targeted and filtered images on Instagram with the click of a button. Auto-like your own feed, monitor a tag, or images from anywhere in Instagram. Auto-comment Automatically leave comments from a preset list on your targeted photos. Spintax allowed! Superlike feature Target users and like their recent photos (you can specify how many). Extremely effective method to gain more followers.Much more effective than just liking a single photo! Auto-accept requests If your account is set to private, then your follow requests can accumulate drastically. With NinjaGram you can automatically accept all your pending follower requests in one go! Targeting filters Filter users by number of followers, followings or posts. Filter pictures by number of likes and age (NEW!). Monitoring Monitor a tag or location search and automatically like new pictures or follow users immediately. This ensures you are targeting only active users! Location search Automatically like pictures taken at a certain location, or follow users posting from a location. Image resizer NinjaGram includes a general purpose image resizer. Resize any image(s) to custom dimensions for posting on Instagram or anywhere else! Account protection Use a random time delay setting as well as “breaks” at intervals to stay under the radar and avoid getting flagged for spamming. Proxy support Although not strictly necessary, you can hide your IP if you feel the need. Private proxies are also supported. Blacklist/whitelist Avoid unfollowing your own known friends, or following, commenting, etc. certain people you would like to avoid. Import/Export ID's Have a third-party list of users you want to follow? No problem! You can also export the usernames or photo ID’s to a text file to process elsewhere. Top notch support We strive to answer all messages within 24 hours (weekdays) and deliver regular updates to keep the software running bug-free. Multiple accounts Perform all these actions on one account, or use multiple accounts simultaneously. >More Info< Trial Version: RePacked Full Version (by yaschir):
  17. Keyword search is coming to Instagram No hashtag required Instagram Instagram users’ ability to search is getting an upgrade. Today, the company announced that English-speaking users in six countries, including the UK, US, Ireland, and Canada, will be able to search the platform using keywords. Before today, they could only search for hashtags or accounts. So, for example, if you previously wanted to find “healthy recipes,” you’d only be able to search for posts that tagged #healthyrecipes or accounts with variations on “healthy recipes” in their name or bio. Now, however, Instagram will let people search the keywords themselves, meaning posts that feature healthy recipes should surface, even if the specific tag is missing. It’s unclear how the service determines what a post is about, though. My search for healthy recipes yielded gluten-free and paleo cookie recipes, for example, which likely isn’t what someone is trying to find when they search for healthy recipes. A company spokesperson says the team considers “a number of factors,” including the “type of content, captions, when it was posted,” and more to surface relevant results. It also uses machine learning to “find the highest quality content that’s relevant to you.” For now, only grid posts will show up. This is a relatively big change for surfacing content. Instagram has always been frustratingly limited in giving people the ability to find the posts they really want. Instagram says only certain terms will be searchable, though. “The search is limited to general interest topics and keywords that are within Instagram’s community guidelines,” the spokesperson says. My keyword search is already live, and I’m unable to search for “vaccines,” “QAnon,” or even “Trump” or “Biden.” I can search “puppies,” “pasta,” or “flowers,” however. The search is definitely limited. Still, for the seemingly few benign things people can search for, the keywords are useful and will likely help users find new content that better fits what they want. Keyword search is coming to Instagram
  18. Facebook filed a lawsuit on Thursday against a website owner who allegedly operated a network of Instagram clone sites using information from more than 100,000 public profiles. This complaint marks the social media giant’s latest crackdown on organizations both large and small for violating its terms of service. According to Facebook, Ensar Sahinturk, who is a Turkish national, used automation software to scrape profiles, photos, and videos from over 100,000 Instagram accounts without permission. He then reportedly published this data on his network of clone websites, many of which had similar names to Instagram. Facebook said it became aware of the network in November 2019, and at least one of Sahinturk’s websites began operating as far back as August 2017. In a statement to TechCrunch, a company spokesperson said the network had “voluminous traffic” but did not disclose specific metrics concerning the extent of its reach. In a company blog post announcing the suit, Jessica Romero, Facebook’s director of platform enforcement and litigation, said that Facebook had previously issued Sahinturk cease and desist letters and disabled his accounts on Facebook and Instagram. Now the company seeks to “obtain a permanent injunction” against him. “Data scraping undermines people’s privacy and ability to control their information, and is prohibited by our Terms,” Romero said. “This case is the latest example of our actions to disrupt those who scrape user data as part of our ongoing commitment to protect our community, enforce our policies and hold people accountable for abusing our services.” Facebook has been steadily churning out lawsuits in an aggressive campaign against developers and organizations that misuse its platform. Last month, Facebook filed two lawsuits targeting companies caught selling likes and followers on Instagram. A Russia-based developer was hit with a suit in August for purportedly running a network of businesses similarly dealing in fake engagement on the platform. It’s apparently a lucrative line of work, which explains why so many fraudulent campaigns keep cropping up. A ring in New Zealand allegedly made more than $9 million peddling artificial engagement services before Facebook came down with a lawsuit last year. Source
  19. State and federal officials are reportedly preparing to bring antitrust charges against the social network. A group of state attorneys general, led by New York Attorney General Letitia James, is on track to file antitrust charges against Facebook in early December, according to a report Thursday from the Washington Post. The move comes as the US Federal Trade Commission is also reportedly finalizing its antitrust probe into the social media giant. State and federal investigators plan to bring antitrust charges against Facebook over its acquisitions of Instagram and WhatsApp, alleging that the deals "helped create an anti-competitive social networking juggernaut," according to the Post. Investigators may also reportedly argue that Facebook weaponized its vast trove of user data to help quash rivals. More than 40 attorneys general have joined the probe into Facebook. The investigation, which was announced in September, focuses on Facebook's dominance and potential anticompetitive conduct stemming from that position. The FTC is also reportedly entering the final phases of its investigation, which is separate from the states' probe, and could file charges by the end of the year. The FTC case is part of a larger US antitrust investigation into tech companies. Facebook and the office for NY AG Letitia James didn't immediately respond to requests for comment. Source
  20. yaschir

    NinjaGram v7.6.1.0

    NinjaGram v7.6.1.0 (Instagram bot) What makes NinjaGram so special? Auto-follow Mass follow targeted Instagram users, from any location in Instagram (search results, your feed, another user’s followers, or pictures taken at a particular location (NEW)!) Auto-unfollow Mass unfollow users with various settings, such as only those who don’t follow you back or only users followed more than X days ago. Auto-like Mass like thousands of other finely targeted and filtered images on Instagram with the click of a button. Auto-like your own feed, monitor a tag, or images from anywhere in Instagram. Auto-comment Automatically leave comments from a preset list on your targeted photos. Spintax allowed! Superlike feature Target users and like their recent photos (you can specify how many). Extremely effective method to gain more followers.Much more effective than just liking a single photo! Auto-accept requests If your account is set to private, then your follow requests can accumulate drastically. With NinjaGram you can automatically accept all your pending follower requests in one go! Targeting filters Filter users by number of followers, followings or posts. Filter pictures by number of likes and age (NEW!). Monitoring Monitor a tag or location search and automatically like new pictures or follow users immediately. This ensures you are targeting only active users! Location search Automatically like pictures taken at a certain location, or follow users posting from a location. Image resizer NinjaGram includes a general purpose image resizer. Resize any image(s) to custom dimensions for posting on Instagram or anywhere else! Account protection Use a random time delay setting as well as “breaks” at intervals to stay under the radar and avoid getting flagged for spamming. Proxy support Although not strictly necessary, you can hide your IP if you feel the need. Private proxies are also supported. Blacklist/whitelist Avoid unfollowing your own known friends, or following, commenting, etc. certain people you would like to avoid. Import/Export ID's Have a third-party list of users you want to follow? No problem! You can also export the usernames or photo ID’s to a text file to process elsewhere. Top notch support We strive to answer all messages within 24 hours (weekdays) and deliver regular updates to keep the software running bug-free. Multiple accounts Perform all these actions on one account, or use multiple accounts simultaneously. >More Info< Trial Version: RePacked Full Version (by yaschir):
  21. How To Stop Instagram From Tracking Everything You Do Though the Facebook-owned app doesn't give users complete control, there are ways to limit the data it collects and the types of ads you see. Photograph: Josh Westrich/Getty Images Instagram is a massive money-maker. Parent company Facebook doesn’t release figures on how much money the division makes but reports claim it generated $20 billion in advertising revenue in 2019 alone–that’s a quarter of Facebook’s entire yearly revenue. Or, to put it another way, more money than YouTube makes for parent company Alphabet. At the heart of Instagram’s financial success is two things: advertising, the Stories feature it nabbed from Snapchat is now filled with it, and the data that powers all that advertising. There’s a lot of it. Instagram, through its integrations with Facebook, uses your personal information to show you ads that it believes you’ll be mostly likely to click on. This information comes from what you do within the app and Facebook, your phone and your behavior as you move around parts of the web that Facebook doesn’t own. First off–everything you do on Instagram is tracked. Almost every online service you use collects information about your actions. Every thumb scroll made through your feed provides it with information about your behavior. Instagram knows that you spent 20 minutes scrolling to the depths of your high-school crush’s profile at 2am. The data that Instagram collects isn’t just for advertising. The company uses your information—for instance, what device you use to login—to detect suspicious login attempts. Crash reports from your phone can help it identify bugs in its code and identify parts of the app that nobody uses. In 2019 it ditched the Following tab, which showed everyone the public posts you had liked. Other than deleting the app completely there’s very little you can do to stop Instagram from tracking your behavior on its platform, but there are things you can do to limit some of the data that’s collected and the types of ads you see online. Delete (Some) of Your Data Want to see the information you’ve given Instagram? Head to the app’s settings page and tap the security option. Here there’s the choice to see the information Instagram has collected about you and download it. If you tap on ‘Access Data’ you’ll be able to see all your password changes, email addresses and phone numbers associated with the account, plus more about how you use the app. In total there are 25 different categories of information that are collected—these range from interactions with polls that you’ve completed in people’s stories to hashtags you follow and changes to the information in your bio. Instagram’s access tool can be found here. While it’s possible to see all of this data, there isn’t a lot you can do with it. Your search history can be deleted through the Security menu options, although when you do so you only delete it locally. Instagram and Facebook still know what—or who—you have searched for. “Keep in mind that clearing your search history is temporary, and that searches you clear may reappear in your history after you search for them again,” Instagram says. It is also possible to delete the contacts that you may have uploaded to Instagram from your phone—this includes names and phone numbers. Uploading your contacts allows Instagram and Facebook to provide friend suggestions but also builds out its knowledge of your social activity. This Instagram page shows whether you’ve uploaded any contacts and allows you to delete them. Deleting them will not stop new contacts being added to your phone from being uploaded. The setting can be turned on or off through the settings menu on iOS or Android. The option to download your data includes photos, comments, profile information and more. This has to be requested through the Security menu. Location You probably use Instagram on your phone. By default, Instagram’s location gathering abilities are turned-off by default but you’ve probably inadvertently turned the feature on while adding your location to a post or story. To change this—or at the very least check if you’ve given it permission—you need to visit the settings on your phone. It can’t be done through the Instagram app. On Android, navigate to settings then tap on apps and find Instagram. Here you can see whether you’ve given it permission to access your location, microphone, device storage, contacts and more. You can turn these settings on and off, allowing Instagram access to your location all the time, only while you’re using the app or to completely deny it. If you own an iPhone, the process is similar. Tap your way to the phone’s settings, go to privacy and then location services and find Instagram. Here you can choose whether location tracking is on all the time, when you’re using the app or off completely. Control Ads in Stories As Facebook has tried (successfully) to make more money from Instagram, it has filled it with adverts. What you see is all powered, technically, by the parent company. Facebook is the ads server for Instagram and the two are inseparable. Instagram shows you ads based on what it and Facebook think you like. This is based on what you do while on Instagram (e.g. liking posts from particular brands) but also what you do on websites and services not owned by Facebook. Facebook's Pixel is a tiny piece of code that’s on almost every website you visit and collects information saying you have visited it. The Pixel gathers data about your activity online and links it to an identifier and that helps decide what ads you’ll be shown. It’s just one way data is collected that feeds into the company’s bigger advertising machine. “Advertisers, app developers and publishers can send us information through Facebook Business Tools that they use, including our social plugins (such as the Like button), Facebook Login, our APIs and SDKs, or the Facebook pixel,” Facebook’s data policy says. This includes what you buy and the websites you visit. So what can you do about it on Instagram? The controls are limited. Within the app, though the settings tab, you can see your ad activity. This shows you the ads you have engaged with—such as commenting on posts, liking or watching the majority of. There’s also links out of the Instagram app that explain ads on the platform within the settings tab. If you don’t like an individual ad it is possible to hide it by tapping the three dots that appear next to the ad and tapping hide. It’s also possible to report an ad if it could break Instagram’s policies. To really attempt to control ads on Instagram, you need to go to Facebook. Here it’s possible to change preference settings, which will apply to Instagram as well as Facebook. There are no ad preference settings for people who only have an Instagram account and not a Facebook account. The company says it is working on building controls within the Instagram app. Facebook’s ad preferences page is a mine of information. It shows what Facebook thinks your interests are, companies that have uploaded information about you, how ads are targeted, ad settings, and ads you’ve hidden. To change the ads you see you need to spend a short amount of time on this page working through the settings. Some key choices that can be made are in ‘Your Information.’ Here you chose not to see ads that are based on your employer, job title, relationship status and education. The businesses section allows you to stop businesses who have uploaded information about you from showing you ads. And ‘Ad Settings’ stops Facebook products showing you ads based on information that’s collected from other websites and services you visit. For any of this to apply to Instagram, the company says your accounts need to be connected. “To make sure your ad preferences are applied, connect your Instagram account to your Facebook account,” it says. Delete Instagram If you’re just fed up with Instagram in general you can delete the app. You can’t delete your Instagram account from within the app – we’re not sure why – but instead you have to visit this page. From here it’s possible to delete your account. “When you delete your account, your profile, photos, videos, comments, likes and followers will be permanently removed,” the company says. Or you can temporarily disable your account. This can be done here. This story originally appeared on WIRED UK. How To Stop Instagram From Tracking Everything You Do
  22. Facebook is temporarily disabling some Messenger and Instagram features in Europe Features like stickers in Instagram and polls in Messenger won’t work right now Some Messenger and Instagram features aren’t available in Europe. Facebook is notifying Messenger and Instagram users in Europe that some features are temporarily unavailable. A small message has appeared in both the Facebook Messenger and Instagram apps for European users this week, noting that some features aren’t available to “respect new rules for messaging services in Europe.” Facebook doesn’t outline exactly what features will be missing, but the company does reveal on its support pages that polls on both Messenger and Instagram are currently unavailable in Europe, alongside a lack of stickers in Instagram and no personalized replies on Messenger. Other missing features may include a lack of certain file sends on Messenger, missing nicknames, or the ability to share AR effects in DMs on Instagram. Facebook’s warning in Instagram DMs. Facebook has temporarily disabled some of these features to comply with new rules on data usage in EU countries. It’s part of the national implementations that are taking place of the 2002 Privacy and Electronic Communications Directive (ePrivacy Directive). This directive imposes stricter rules on data use across communications services that operate in countries that are part of the European Union. It’s not clear when Facebook will reinstate these features for European users, but a spokesperson tells The Verge that most will return “very soon.” Facebook is temporarily disabling some Messenger and Instagram features in Europe
  23. Vishal Shah was promoted to assume Adam Mosseri’s old position When former vice president of product Adam Mosseri was promoted to head of Instagram at the beginning of October, no successor was named for his former role. That changed Monday when product management director Vishal Shah was tapped as head of product for all of Instagram. Previously, Shah had been overseeing the Facebook-owned photo- and video-sharing network’s shopping initiatives, advertising products and IGTV long-form video platform. Shah will report directly to Mosseri. Shah did not respond to a request for comment, but a spokesperson for Facebook confirmed the move, sharing this statement from Mosseri: “I am thrilled that Vishal Shah is Instagram’s new head of product. Vishal is an experienced manager with deep product knowledge who lives out Instagram’s values of people first, simplicity and craft. He is a great addition to our leadership team, and I look forward to working with him in this new role.” Shah joined Instagram in June 2015 after spending nearly 10 years with insights and analytics platform Turn. Promoting from within may bring some stability to Instagram, which saw co-founders Kevin Systrom and Mike Krieger abruptly leave the company in late September, just two weeks after chief operating officer Marne Levine returned to parent company Facebook to become its vp of global partnerships and business development. Shah’s former seat won’t get too cold, as Recode reported that it will be filled by product manager Ashley Yuki, who oversaw Instagram’s video products, including IGTV. Source
  24. Kevin Systrom hinted there were tensions between him and Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg. Instagram co-founder Kevin Systrom When Instagram co-founder and former CEO Kevin Systrom thinks back to the start of his social media company, he compares the process to launching a rocket. "Instagram didn't feel done by any stretch of the imagination, but it felt like it was in orbit. And if we let go and let others take it, it would continue to go on," Systrom said at the WIRED25 Summit in San Francisco on Monday. In September, Systrom and Instagram's chief technical officer Mike Krieger abruptly announced they were leaving the Facebook-owned photo sharing app after eight years at the helm to explore their "creativity and curiosity again." The 34-year-old tech mogul acknowledged that when he started Instagram, he never thought that he would be at the company for eight years. Systrom signaled there were tensions between him and Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg, but he also said that there were "no hard feelings at all." "No one ever leaves a job because everything is awesome," Systrom said. Popular among teens, Instagram gave Facebook a way to compete against newer social media apps such as Snapchat. But as Instagram played a bigger role in Facebook's future, the co-founder of the photo-sharing app reportedly clashed with its parent company over product changes. Facebook purchased Instagram for $1 billion in 2012 when it only had about 30 million users. Now a billion people use Instagram every month. On Oct. 1, Adam Mosseri, Instagram's vice preside of product and a longtime Facebook executive, became the head of Instagram. Systrom hasn't revealed his next project yet, but said that he's spending his free time now taking care of his daughter, working with entrepreneurs, writing and learning new things such as flying a plane. "You never know where inspiration is going to come from," he said. Source
  25. Former Facebook VP of News Feed and recently appointed Instagram VP of Product Adam Mosseri has been named the new head of Instagram. “We are thrilled to hand over the reins to a product leader with a strong design background and a focus on craft and simplicity — as well as a deep understanding of the importance of community” Instagram’s founders Kevin Systrom and Mike Krieger write. “These are the values and principles that have been essential to us at Instagram since the day we started, and we’re excited for Adam to carry them forward.” Instagram’s founders announced last week that they were resigning after sources told TechCrunch the pair had dealt with dwindling autonomy from Facebook and rising tensions with its CEO Mark Zuckerberg. The smiling photo above seems meant to show peace has been restored to Instaland, and counter the increasing perception that Facebook breaks its promises to acquired founders. Mosseri’s experience dealing with the unintended consequences of the News Feed such as fake news in the wake of the 2016 election could help him predict how Instagram’s growth will affect culture, politics, and user well-being. Over the years of interviewing him, Mosseri has always come across as sharp, serious, and empathetic. He comes across as a true believer that Facebook and its family of apps can make a positive impact in the world, but congniscent of the hard work and complex choices required to keep them from being misused. Born and raised in New York, Mosseri started his own design consultancy while attending NYU’s Gallatin School Of Interdisciplinary Study to learn about media and information design. Mosseri joined Facebook in 2008 after briefly working at a startup called TokBox. Tasked with helping Facebook embrace mobile as design director, he’s since become part of Zuckerberg’s inner circle of friends and lieutenants. Mosseri later moved into product management and oversaw Facebook’s News Feed, turn it into the world’s most popular social technology and the driver of billions in profit from advertising. After going on parental leave this year, he returned to take over the role of Instagram VP of Product Kevin Weil as he move to Facebook’s blockchain team. A source tells TechCrunch he was well-received and productive since joining Instagram, and has gotten along well with Systrom. Mosseri now lives in San Francisco, close enough to work from both Instagram’s city office and South Bay headquarters. “The impact of their work over the past eight years has been incredible. They built a product people love that brings joy and connection to so many lives” Mosseri wrote about Instagram’s founders in an…Instagram post. I’m humbled and excited about the opportunity to now lead the Instagram team. I want to thank them for trusting me to carry forward the values that they have established. I will do my best to make them, the team, and the Instagram community proud.” Mosseri will be tasked with balancing the needs of Instagram such as headcount, engineering resources, and growth with the priorities of its parent company Facebook, such as cross-promotion to Instagram’s younger audience and revenue to contribute to the corporation’s earnings reports. Some see Mosseri as more sympathetic to Facebook’s desire than Instagram’s founders, given his long-stint at the parent company and his close relationship with Zuckerberg. The question will be whether users will end up seeing more notifications and shortcuts linking back to Facebook, or more ads in the Stories and feed. Instagram hasn’t highlighted the ability to syndicate your Stories to Facebook, which could be boon for that parallel product. Instagram Stories now has 400 million daily users compared to Facebook Stories and Messenger Stories’ combined 150 million users. Tying them more closely could seem more content flow into Facebook, but it might also make users second guess whether what they’re sharing is appropriate for all of their Facebook friends, which might include family or professional colleagues. Mosseri’s most pressing responsibility will be reassurring users that the culture of Instagram and its app won’t be assimilated into Facebook now that he’s running things instead of the founders. He’ll also need to snap into action to protect Instagram from being used as a pawn for election interference in the run-up to the 2018 US mid-terms. Source
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