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  1. This photo combo taken on Aug. 20 ((left) and Monday (right) shows the geomorphic change of the Anak Krakatau volcano (at center of images) before and after the eruption off Indonesia's Java island and detected by the ALOS-2 raw data and observed by Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR). Indonesia on Thursday raised the danger alert level for the erupting volcano that sparked tsunami over the weekend killing over 400 people. JAKARTA - Radar data from satellites, converted into images, show Indonesia’s Anak Krakatau island volcano is dramatically smaller following a weekend eruption that triggered a deadly tsunami. Satellite photos aren’t available because of cloud cover but radar images from a Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency satellite taken before and after the eruption show the volcano’s southwestern flank has disappeared. Dave Petley, head of research and innovation at Sheffield University who analyzed similar images from a European Space Agency satellite, said they support the theory that a landslide, most of it undersea, caused the tsunami that killed at least 430 people on Saturday evening. “The challenge now is to interpret what might be happening on the volcano, and what might happen next,” he wrote in a blog. Indonesian authorities are warning people to stay away a kilometer (less than a mile) from the Sunda Strait coastline because of the risk of another tsunami. JAXA’s post-eruption image shows concentric waves radiating from the island, which experts say is caused by ongoing eruptions. Anak Krakatau, which means child of Krakatoa, is the offspring of the infamous Krakataoa volcano that affected global climate with a massive eruption in 1883. Anak Krakatau first rose above sea level in 1929, according to Indonesia’s volcanology agency, and has been increasing its land mass since then. Source
  2. PANDEGLANG, Indonesia (Reuters) - A tsunami killed at least 222 people and injured hundreds on the Indonesian islands of Java and Sumatra following an underwater landslide believed to have been caused by the erupting Anak Krakatau volcano, officials said on Sunday. Hundreds of homes and other buildings were “heavily damaged” when the tsunami struck, almost without warning, along the rim of the Sunda Strait late on Saturday, Sutopo Purwo Nugroho, spokesman for the disaster mitigation agency, said. Thousands of residents were forced to evacuate to higher ground. By 5:40 p.m. (1040 GMT), the disaster agency had raised the death toll to 222, with 843 injured and 28 missing. It has been a torrid year for the vast archipelago that sits on the Pacific Ring of Fire. Successive earthquakes flattened parts of the tourist island of Lombok in July and August, and a double quake-and-tsunami killed more than 2,000 people on Sulawesi island in September. As night fell on Sunday, rescue efforts continued but workers and ambulances were finding it difficult to reach affected areas because some roads were blocked by debris from damaged houses, overturned cars and fallen trees. TV images showed the seconds when the tsunami hit the beach and residential areas in Pandeglang on Java island, dragging with it victims, debris, and large chunks of wood and metal. Coastal residents reported not seeing or feeling any warning signs on Saturday night, such as receding water or an earthquake, before waves of 2-3 meters (6-10 feet) washed ashore, according to media. Authorities said a warning siren went off in some areas. The timing of the tsunami, over the Christmas holiday season, evoked memories of the Indian Ocean tsunami triggered by an earthquake on Dec. 26 in 2004, which killed 226,000 people in 14 countries, including more than 120,000 in Indonesia. Source
  3. The suspect, only identified by the initials B.B.A., second from left, is presented at a press conference at the headquarters of the National Police in South Jakarta on Friday. (Antara Photo/Reno Esnir) Police arrested a 21-year-old man in Sleman, Yogyakarta, on Friday for allegedly using malicious software to extort victims and steal financial data for personal gain. Yogyakarta Police spokesman Senior Comr. Yuliyanto said the suspect, only identified by the initials B.B.A., sent phishing emails to at least 500 randomly selected addresses to spread ransomware, or software designed to block access to computer systems until a ransom is paid. The suspect had reportedly been acting alone since 2014 and collected 300 Bitcoins, or equivalent to around Rp 31.5 billion ($2.25 million), Yuliyanto said. He said the investigation started after a tipoff that the suspect had hacked the computer system of a company based in San Antonio, Texas. The suspect allegedly also stole credit card data from internet users for personal gain. The National Police's cybercrime unit is investigating the case. Yuliyanto said the Yogyakarta Police are assisting in the investigation and will forward evidence to the National Police headquarters in Jakarta. "The evidence includes a Harley Davidson motorcycle and several computers. We will send these [to Jakarta]," he said. The suspect has been in custody in Jakarta since his arrest. The suspect lived in a boarding house in Sleman for the past two years, Yuliyanto said, without providing further detail. Senior Comr. Rickynaldo Chairul, head of the police's cybercrime investigation unit, said separately in Jakarta that the suspect had sent emails containing hyperlinks that directed unsuspecting recipients to his webmail server, which would then install ransomware on recipients' computer systems and prevent them from accessing their data. In the case involving the US company, the suspect threatened to delete its data if it failed to pay the ransom within three days. "The suspect demanded the ransom be paid in Bitcoin before restoring access to the victim's mail server," Rickynaldo said. The suspect reportedly used the email address, [email protected], in his communications with victims. He faces up to six years in prison under the Electronic Information and Transactions Law. Source: Police Arrest Yogyakarta Man Who Used Ransomware Attacks to Amass 300 Bitcoins (via Jakarta Globe) p/s: For those who can understand Indonesian language, there's a news reporting on that. https://cyberthreat.id/read/3532/Pertama-Kali-dalam-Sejarah-Polri-Tangkap-Hacker-Ransomware
  4. JAKARTA: Indonesia will meet social media companies to discuss its plans to impose fines of up to around US$36,000 (RM148,914) if they allow pornography, violence or other "negative" content on their platforms, a communications ministry official said. The South-East Asian country aims to push firms to better monitor and delete content the authorities deem obscene, Semuel Abrijani Pangerapan, the ministry's director of information applications, said late Nov 5. He told Reuters the ministry would issue a regulation governing the mechanism for fines following discussions with the companies. The fines could go into effect in 2021. "The point of this is that control of content will no longer be the job of the government," Pangerapan said by telephone, adding that he would invite companies including Google Facebook and Twitter. Representatives of Twitter and Facebook did not immediately respond to requests for comment. At an earlier press conference, he said "negative" content could include pornography or radicalism, and fines could range from 100mil rupiah (RM29,500) to 500mil rupiah (RM147,504). The move comes amid wider regional efforts by South-East Asian governments to demand action from global tech giants on content regulation and tax policy. The stakes are high for governments, which are counting on the digital economy to drive growth amid domestic political tensions, and Internet companies, which view South-East Asia's social-media-loving population of 641 million as a key growth market. Indonesia is a top-five market globally for US tech giants Facebook and Twitter. Authorities have succeeded in getting social media companies Telegram and TikTok to establish content monitoring teams in Indonesia after briefly banning them over "negative content". Communications ministry officials told Reuters in August they were working on a "three-letter system," meaning that if a platform fails to respond to three government requests to engage on an issue, then it would be banned from Indonesia. Indonesia has already blocked more than 70,000 websites displaying "negative content" such as pornography or extremist ideology in 2018 using a so-called "crawling system" that automatically searches internet content and issues alerts when inappropriate material is found. The country's Internet economy is the largest and fastest-growing in the region, on track to cross the US$130bil (RM537.74bil) mark by 2025, according to a report by Google, Singapore state investor Temasek Holdings and global business consultants Bain & Company. Source: Indonesia to meet social media firms as it eyes ‘negative content’ fines (via The Star Online)
  5. Nettox, a wristband device invented by Indonesian students to alert people about the time they spent being sedentary, on a table during a test at a university in Depok near Jakarta, Indonesia. JAKARTA: From browsing social media to watching videos and chatting with friends, Indonesian university student Tyas Sisianindita spends about eight hours a day on her phone. "I realise that I am addicted," the university student admitted, saying she checks her phone continuously from the time she wakes up, even when she is in classes. "At night, when I can't sleep, I can use my phone for up to five hours." A group of fellow students at the University of Indonesia, led by inventor Irfan Budi Satria, has spent three months developing a wearable device that can help internet users like Sisianindita cut down on the time they spend flicking at their phones. Called "Nettox", from "Internet detox", the device is worn on the wrist and contains a pulse oximeter sensor that measures haemoglobin oxygen levels and heart rate variability (HRV). Studies have found that prolonged mobile phone usage has a specific lowering effect on HRV levels. The Nettox device emits a sound when HRV and blood oxygen levels fall within this range, which reminds the wearer to stop using their phone. For people aged between 18 and 25, the HRV should ideally stay above 60, according to the American Psychological Association, Satria said. At a recent trial, Sisianindita's HRV reading was 44. Internet addiction is a growing social issue in Indonesia. In October, two teenagers were treated for their addiction to Internet gaming, media reported. "Children must be taught to be more active and take part in extracurricular activities," said psychologist Kasandra Putranto. Satria's team is working on personalising Nettox and improving its accuracy as HRV readings can vary depending on a person's body shape, gender and health conditions. They aim to apply for a patent for their invention with the university by next year. Satria says, though, that Nettox is targeted at those already invested in changing their behaviour. "Our goal is to help the health-conscious," he said. "To help people who want to free themselves from Internet addiction." Source: Put down that phone! Indonesians invent device to aid Internet-addicted (via The Star Online)
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