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  1. WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Hackers working for the Russian and North Korean governments have targeted more than half a dozen organizations involved in COVID-19 treatment and vaccine research around the globe, Microsoft said on Friday. FILE PHOTO: A hacker, who asked not to have his name revealed, works on his laptop in his office in Taipei The software company said a Russian hacking group commonly nicknamed “Fancy Bear” - along with a pair of North Korean actors dubbed “Zinc” and “Cerium” by Microsoft - were implicated in recent attempts to break into the networks of
  2. FBI blames intrusions on improperly configured SonarQube source code management tools. The Federal Bureau of Investigation has sent out a security alert warning that threat actors are abusing misconfigured SonarQube applications to access and steal source code repositories from US government agencies and private businesses. Intrusions have taken place since at least April 2020, the FBI said in an alert sent out last month and made public this week on its website. The alert specifically warns owners of SonarQube, a web-based application that comp
  3. Over 1,200 organisations have fallen victim to a campaign that uses known exploits to remotely gain access to VoIP accounts - and the attackers are selling access to the highest bidder. A hacking campaign has compromised VoIP (Voice over Internet Protocol) phone systems at over 1,000 companies around the world over the past year in a campaign designed to make profit from selling compromised accounts. While the main purpose appears to be dialling premium rate numbers owned by attackers or selling phone numbers and call plans that others can use for free, acc
  4. The COVID-19 pandemic provided a huge opening for bad actors this year, thanks to remote work. Security experts expect more advanced cybersecurity threats in the coming year. Hackers are always looking for an opportunity and the COVID-19 pandemic provided a big one this year: As remote work in unprecedented numbers took hold, they preyed upon vulnerable employees who were unfamiliar with how to navigate their tech environments. Threat actors found success infecting businesses with ransomware and stealing company data, turning those ransomware attacks into
  5. Hackers with access to the Signaling System 7 (SS7) used for connecting mobile networks across the world were able to gain access to Telegram messenger and email data of high-profile individuals in the cryptocurrency business. In what is believed to be a targeted attack, the hackers were after two-factor authentication (2FA) login codes delivered over the short messaging system of the victim’s mobile phone provider. Well-prepared hackers Hackers pulling an SS7 attack can intercept text messages and calls of a legitimate recipient by updating the location of th
  6. Hackers Could Use IoT Botnets to Manipulate Energy Markets With access to just 50,000 high-wattage smart devices, attackers could make a bundle off of causing minor fluctuations. Researchers calculated that by running an attack for three hours a day, 100 days a year, market manipulators could take home as much as $24 million per year.Photograph: George Rose/Getty Images On a Friday morning in the fall of 2016, the Mirai botnet wrecked havoc o
  7. Hackers Broke Into Real News Sites to Plant Fake Stories A disinfo operation broke into the content management systems of Eastern European media outlets in a campaign to spread misinformation about NATO. The propagandists have created and disseminated disinformation since at least March of 2017, with a focus on undermining NATO and the US troops in Poland and the Baltics.Photograph: PETRAS MALUKAS/Getty Images Over the last few years, online
  8. A hacker has targeted and released private data on German chancellor Angela Merkel and other senior German lawmakers and officials. The data was leaked from a Twitter account, since suspended, and included email addresses, phone numbers, photo IDs and other personal data on hundreds of senior political figures. According to a government spokesperson, there was no “sensitive” data from the chancellor’s office, but other lawmakers had more personal data stolen. Other portions of the leaked data included Facebook and Twitter passwords. Some had their credit card informa
  9. Imperva: Up to 77 percent of the sites we monitor were attacked by a Python-based tool. After breaking into the top three most popular programming languages for the first time this month, behind C and Java, Python has also won the hearts of hackers and web nasties, according to attack statistics published this week by web security biz Imperva. The company says more than a third of daily attacks against sites the company protects come from a malicious or legitimate tool coded in Python. Imperva says that around 77 percent of all the sites the comp
  10. Jobseekers' files follow internal records leaking online The United Nations has been hit with two damning data leak allegations in as many days. The global organization has seen researchers uncover a pair of flaws that had left a number of its records, and those of its employees, accessible to hackers online. Word of the first issue came out yesterday when security researcher Kushagra Pathak found that the UN had left an unsecured set of Trello, Jira and Google Docs projects exposed to the internet. Pathak, who has specialized in unco
  11. Late last month, Facebook disclosed a massive security vulnerability that it claimed affected some 50 million login tokens, but details were somewhat thin on its impact pending further investigation. In a blog post today, the results are in some ways better and worse. The company believes its initial estimate of 50 million compromised login tokens—it reset 90 million in total as a cautionary measure—was generous, and Facebook now believes the number of accounts impacted to be closer to 30 million. That’s the good news, if you can call it that. For 400,000 of
  12. As hacking and gaming communities continue to intersect, some hackers are selling access to botnets and likely stolen Fortnite, Spotify, and other online accounts on Instagram. Instagram isn’t only for exotic travel, pet, or food photos. Communities of hackers are also using the social network to sell stolen Spotify and Fortnite accounts, as well as access to botnets designed to launch distributed-denial-of-service (DDoS) attacks. The accounts highlight social media companies’ continuing issues with content moderation. In this case, Facebook, which owns Instagram,
  13. Hackers have hijacked the accounts of at least four high profile Instagrammers recently, locking them out and demanding a bitcoin ransom. But Instagram is silent. “Your Instagram has been hacked,” the message sent to various high profile Instagrammers reads. If the victim doesn’t pay up a Bitcoin ransom, “we will have to delete your account within 3 hours,” the hackers’ message continues. Kevin Kreider, a fitness-focused Instagrammer from Los Angeles, told Motherboard that paying $100 in cryptocurrency didn’t save his account. The hackers still deleted it, a
  14. “Oh, where’s that?” “2018. I live in 2018.” There are similar memes and jokes out there about fax machines because, outside of certain documents that are too time-sensitive for overnight delivery and require signatures, who sends faxes anymore? We might not be sending them, but if you have an all-in-one printer system, you probably have the fax option built in. You may have forgotten about it, but hackers haven’t. To them, your printer’s unused fax option is a new attack vector. The Forgotten Workstation Printers have long been an afterthought for securi
  15. LAS VEGAS — Ask any hacker who’s been around long enough, and there’s a good chance you’ll hear an archetypal story, tinged with regret, about the first time his or her real identity was publicly disclosed. After enjoying years of online anonymity, the hacker known as Grifter was unmasked by a less-than-scrupulous spouse. “Hey, Neil!” his wife called out at him, absent-mindedly, from across a crowded room, while accompanying him (for the very first time) at a hacking conference. “My beautiful wife, she outed me in front of the entir
  16. Further investigation into an exploit kit known as "Elderwood" shows the attackers using it are more numerous and possibly better funded than previously thought, according to new research from Symantec. Elderwood is a hacking platform that has attack code which abuses software vulnerabilities in programs such as Adobe Systems' Flash multimedia program and Microsoft's Internet Explorer browser in order to spy on computers. Symantec has been tracking Elderwood since 2012, noting that exploits contained in it have been used against defense-related companies, people involved in human rights campai
  17. Ukrainian Police have this week busted out two separate groups of hackers involved in carrying out DDoS attacks against news agencies and stealing money from Ukrainian citizens, respectively. According to the authorities, the four suspected hackers they arrested last week, all aged from 26 to 30 years, stole more than 5 million Hryvnia (around 178,380 USD) from the bank accounts of Ukrainian citizens by hacking into their computers. The suspects carried out their attacks by scanning vulnerable computers on the Internet and infecting them with a custom Trojan malware to t
  18. Government says hackers breached 30 computers and stole data from 10. Hackers have breached the computer systems of a South Korean government agency that oversees weapons and munitions acquisitions for the country's military forces. The hack took place in October 2018. Local press reported this week[1, 2, 3] that hackers breached 30 computers and stole internal documents from at least ten. The breached organization is South Korea's Defense Acquisition Program Administration (DAPA), an agency part of the Ministry of National Defense. I
  19. These are the top ten security vulnerabilities most exploited by hackers But one simple thing could help stop the vast majority of these attacks, say researchers. Security vulnerabilities in Microsoft software have become an even more popular means of attack by cyber criminals - but an Adobe Flash vulnerability still ranks as the second most used exploit by hacking groups.
  20. New 20,000 batch of payment card details found on the dark web and traced back to new Click2Gov hacks. Two years after hackers first started targeting local government payment portals, attacks are still going on, with eight cities having had their Click2Gov payment portals compromised in the last month alone, security researchers from Gemini Advisory have revealed in a report shared with ZDNet today. These new hacks have allowed hackers to get their hands on over 20,000 payment card details belonging to US citizens, which are now being traded on the dark we
  21. The unprecedented attack on Apple iPhones revealed by Google this week was broader than first thought. Multiple sources with knowledge of the situation said that Google’s own Android operating system and Microsoft Windows PCs were also targeted in a campaign that sought to infect the computers and smartphones of the Uighur ethnic group in China. That community has long been targeted by the Chinese government, in particular in the Xinjiang region, where surveillance is pervasive. Google’s and Microsoft’s operating systems were targeted via the same websites that launched the
  22. Microsoft Corp said it has tracked "significant" cyberattacks coming from a group it calls "Strontium" or "Fancy Bear", targeting anti-doping authorities and global sporting organisations. The group, also called APT28, has been linked to the Russian government, Microsoft said in a blog post. At least 16 national and international sporting and anti-doping organisations across three continents were targeted in the attacks which began on Sept 16, according to the company. The company said some of these attacks had been successful, but the majority had not. Micro
  23. But they didn’t cover their tracks Recently, The Verge reported on a string of ransomware attacks that have hit cities including Baltimore; Atlanta, Georgia; Newark, New Jersey; and 22 Texas towns. Even The Weather Channel has fallen victim. But before those attacks, there was an attack on the nation’s capital, days before the presidential inauguration. An article from The Wall Street Journal details how hackers Alexandru Isvanca and Eveline Cismaru seized control of Washington, DC’s surveillance cameras right before Trump’s inauguration. The piece i
  24. Two computer hackers have pleaded guilty to concocting an extortion scheme that entangled Uber in a year-long cover-up of a data breach that stole sensitive information about 57 million of the ride-hailing service's passengers and drivers. The pleas entered in a San Jose, California, federal court by Brandon Charles Glover and Vasile Mereacre resurrected another unseemly episode in Uber's checkered history. Glover, 26, and Mereacre, 23, acknowledged stealing personal information from companies that was stored on Amazon Web Services from October 2016 to January 2017 and t
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