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Found 18 results

  1. 61 percent of employees fail basic cybersecurity quiz Seen here, training underway through NIST’s National Initiative for Cybersecurity Careers & Studies. Nearly 70 percent of employees polled in a new survey said they recently received cybersecurity training from their employers, yet 61 percent nevertheless failed when asked to take a basic quiz on the topic.(NIST) Nearly 70% of employees polled in a new survey said they recently received cybersecurity training from their employers, yet 61% nevertheless failed when asked to take a basic quiz on the topic.
  2. Google productivity is down among its engineers during extended quarantine measures, especially among new hires, according to the tech giant's own internal measures. After three months of working from home, Google engineers reported feeling less productive than earlier in the year when the company recorded its most productive quarter, according to The Information, which reported the internal Google data last week. Most notably from the June internal survey, only 31% of company engineers reported feeling "highly productive," down 8% from earlier this year. F
  3. Microsoft employees will also be able to relocate Microsoft is allowing its employees to work from home permanently. While the vast majority of Microsoft employees are still working from home during the ongoing pandemic, the software maker has unveiled “hybrid workplace” guidance internally to allow for far greater flexibility once US offices eventually reopen. The Verge has received Microsoft’s internal guidance, and it outlines the company’s flexible working plans for the future. Microsoft will now allow employees to work from home freely for less than 50
  4. Amazon mistakenly told some sellers that it's now blocking ads with 'religious content' Key Points Amazon told some sellers that it is now blocking ads containing language about religion, after updating its ad policy. An Amazon spokesperson said its policies haven't changed and the blocking was in error, and its employees are now receiving "corrective training." Sellers of religious products, however, say the change is resultin in a direct sales loss.
  5. The Ukrainian Secret Service is investigating the incident as a potential security breach. Image: Viktor Kiryanov Ukrainian authorities are investigating a potential security breach at a local nuclear power plant after employees connected parts of its internal network to the internet so they could mine cryptocurrency. The investigation is being led by the Ukrainian Secret Service (SBU), who is looking at the incident as a potential breach of state secrets due to the classification of nuclear power plants as critical infrastructure. Investig
  6. Workers are circulating a petition Google employees are demanding that the company not bid on a cloud computing contract with US Customs and Border Protection in the latest act of protest inside the tech industry. In a petition circulated today inside Google and on Medium, a group of employees said immigration officials are “perpetrating a system of abuse and malign neglect” at the border. The employees point to the Trump administration’s family separation policy and the recent deaths of children in immigration officials’ custody. “These abuses are illegal under internat
  7. SHANGHAI (Reuters) - The Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) said on Monday curbs on employees of Huawei Technologies and its subsidiaries have been lifted, and they would be allowed to participate in a peer review process for its research papers. The U.S.-based engineers’ association last week said it would bar Huawei staff from doing so, after the United States accused the company of being tied to China’s government and effectively banned U.S. companies from doing business with it for national security reasons. IEEE China said in a s
  8. IBM reportedly axed as many as 100,000 employees in the last few years because it wanted to appear "cool" and "trendy" like Amazon or Google, Bloomberg reported Wednesday. IBM has been hit by several age discrimination suits filed by former employees. Asked about the accusation, the company said IBM has been "reinvented to target higher value opportunities for our clients." Image: IBM CEO Virginia "Ginni" Rometty Hoping to come across to millennials as "cool" and "trendy" like Amazon or Google, IBM may have axed as many as 100,000 employees in
  9. Another former engineer has alleged that the company fired him over his political beliefs. Google has a growing problem with internal dissent that in many ways stems back to former employee James Damore (pictured) who was fired for publishing an internal memo in 2017 arguing that women are less biologically fit to work in tech than men. Google has had a challenging year. The company is already beleaguered by external scrutiny and criticism from politicians and the public over how it moderates content on its platforms. It’s facing an antitrust pro
  10. Businesses across the US are putting their data security at risk by allowing employees to access levels of company data they don’t need to complete their job, a new study of business data practices has found. Commissioned by the marketplace for business app discovery, GetApp, the survey asked 714 full-time US employees about the data security practices of their employer. More than one in ten employees (12%) reported they have access to all company data. Almost half (48%) said they can access company data that is not needed to perform their job.
  11. A New Jersey woman has sued T-Mobile in state court last week for sexual harassment, invasion of privacy, and other counts. She claims that, when she went to trade in her iPhone 7 at a store, two male employees rifled through her photos without her consent. The men allegedly quickly found a private naked video of the woman, referred to in the complaint as "N.E.," and played it for themselves. The woman was mortified. Ars contacted T-Mobile, which did not respond to our questions. "We take customer privacy extremely seriously and are investigating
  12. Twitter has announced that employees are encouraged to work from home in an effort to stop the spread of a novel coronavirus that has infected at least 105 people in 15 states and killed six people in the U.S. The San Francisco-based social media company is believed to be the first major U.S. firm to announce a work-from-home policy as companies around the world enact new plans to fight COVID-19. Shelves where disinfectant wipes are usually displayed at a Target store on March 2, 2020 in Novato, California in the Bay Area. “Beginning today, we are strongly encouraging all employ
  13. SEATTLE - More than 330 Amazon employees violated the e-commerce giant's communications policy Sunday in an unprecedented public display of support for colleagues who were warned that they could be fired for speaking out to criticize the company's climate practices. Amazon Employees for Climate Justice, a group of workers concerned about the company's business with the oil and gas industry as well as its carbon footprint, published quotes from the workers in a post on Medium. The comments, all of which are attributed to Amazon workers by name, are a mass defiance of co
  14. "We are aware of incidents discussed below where employees violated our policies," a letter from Ring obtained by Motherboard reads. Amazon-owned home security camera company Ring has fired employees for improperly accessing Ring users' video data, according to a letter the company wrote to Senators and obtained by Motherboard. The news highlights a risk across many different tech companies: employees may abuse access granted as part of their jobs to look at customer data or information. In Ring's case this data can be particularly sensitive though, as cust
  15. Edward Snowden has revealed that he witnessed “numerous instances” of National Security Agency (NSA) employees passing around nude photos that were intercepted “in the course of their daily work.” In a 17-minute interview with The Guardian filmed at a Moscow hotel and published on Thursday, the NSA whistleblower addressed numerous points, noting that he could “live with” being sent to the US prison facility at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. He also again dismissed any notion that he was a Russian spy or agent—calling those allegations “bullshit.” If Snowden’s allegations of sexual photo distribution ar
  16. Over the course of the last month, some troubling information has surfaced about Ring, the Amazon-owned company that has millions of cameras inside and outside homes across the globe. The Information in December suggested Ring employees in both the U.S. and the UK had unfettered, unnecessary access to customer camera feeds, and today, The Intercept has shared additional details. Starting in 2016, Ring allowed its Ukraine-based research team to access "every video created by every Ring camera around the world." Video content was unencrypted and "easily browsed and viewed," plus videos were
  17. Six former Facebook employees who left the company within the last two years told CNBC they've experienced a rise in contact from current company employees to inquire about opportunities or ask for job references. The shift in behavior comes as Facebook deals with scandal after scandal while seeing a nearly 40 percent drop in its stock price from a peak in July. Mark Zuckerberg, chief executive officer of Facebook Inc. Some former Facebook employees say their phone is ringing a lot more in the last two
  18. Password-sharing and reuse is still prominent, but mulit-factor authentication is on the rise, new study shows. An employee on average shares six passwords with their co-workers, and half of employees reuse passwords among work and personal accounts. But there is a bit of good news: 45% of businesses are using multi-factor authentication, up from 24.5% last year, according to a study by password manager LastPass of 43,000 organizations that use its service. Some 63% of organizations that employ MFA are in the US. Even some smaller-sized companies are em
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