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  1. Chinese search giant Baidu entered the Brazilian market last week with the launch of a localized Portuguese search engine called Baidu Busca. It’s the second international language version of its website (a Japanese site went live in 2007), and new ones are planned for Egypt and Thailand. With enthusiastic backing from the Chinese Communist Party, Baidu is one of several Chinese tech giants looking to branch out internationally and challenge the primacy of American companies. Supporting the global expansion of tech companies is not merely an economic calculation for Chinese leaders (though they do have much to gain). More important are the political dividends and the opportunity to influence international public opinion. According to Wang Xiujun, deputy director of China’s State Internet Information Center, “the future of our party and country” depends on winning “the struggle for ideological penetration.” Chinese Internet companies friendly to the state are seen as key players in the global war of ideas. It should come as no surprise, then, that the Portuguese version of Baidu produces heavily censored results on topics considered “sensitive” to the Chinese leadership. Compare search results between Google’s Portuguese edition and Baidu’s. OnGoogle.br.com, a search for Tank Man (“el hombre del tanque”) turns up photos, documentary video and news articles about the lone rebel who stood in the way of approaching tanks outside of Tiananmen Square in 1989. The same search on br.Baidu.com returns obscure blogs and a Youtube user page featuring videos of spandex-clad music ensembles. The top result is about Egypt—not Tiananmen Square. A corresponding image search generates photos of t-shirts. And where Google returns 2.8 million search results, Baidu produces just 50,000. In some cases, Baidu search results appear to have been generated based on a highly selective white list comprising only Communist Party news outlets. A Google search for “Falun Gong” generates images of meditation, links to Brazilian and international Falun Gong websites, and accounts of human rights abuses inflicted by the Chinese government. Baidu Busca is in a different world entirely, returning a total of just 66 results (compared to 1.3 million for Google). Every single one links to the state-run People’s Daily newspaper, with headlines like “Irrefutable Evidence of Falun Gong’s Anti-Humanity,” and “Falun Gong, Spiritual Opium.” Some articles resemble blood libel, accusing Falun Gong practitioners of gruesome homicides, while others are devoted to denying reports of state-sanctioned torture and abuse in custody. If Baidu succeeds in capturing the international search market, it will have a powerful platform to influence what we know and how we think about China. But if the company’s experience in Japan is any indication, that seems unlikely to happen. Since its 2007 launch Baidu Japan has lost money every year. The Japanese government warns that some of its programs spy on users, and it never came close to challenging Yahoo and Google. http://techcrunch.com/2014/08/02/chinese-communist-party-backed-tech-giants-bring-censorship-to-the-global-stage/
  2. Mail.ru, Russia's fifth most popular domain, has blasted Italy for the blockade of its site on copyright grounds. The Internet giant says that it wasn't informed of any problems and was given no opportunity to engage. The censorship shows that some countries lack a "clear, transparent process for resolving conflicts", Mail.ru said. Every few weeks fresh sites are blocked in Italy on copyright grounds, following either court proceedings or hearings as part of the new AGCOM mechanism. Many of the big ‘pirate’ sites – The Pirate Bay and KickassTorrents, for example – have been blocked for years but now the country seems intent on blacking out sites that are definitely not in the piracy business. As reported here on Saturday, last week a judge sitting in the Court of Rome ordered local ISPs to block a total of 24 websites including Kim Dotcom’s Mega.co.nz and Russia’s largest email provider, Mail.ru. The size and importance of Mail.ru in its home country and further afield is noteworthy. It’s the fifth most-visited domain in Russia behind only Yandex, Google and social networking giant vKontakte, of which it owns 51.99%. It’s the 39th busiest site worldwide according to Alexa, servicing in excess of 27 million users per day. In a statement this morning Mail.ru said it has still not been able to establish the specifics that lead to it being blocked in Italy. Eyemoon Pictures, the complainant in the case, made no attempt to discuss any issues with Mail.ru before heading off to court, the email giant said. “[Eyemoon Pictures] made no attempt to resolve the situation pretrial,” the company said in a statement. “No notification of illegal content or requirements to remove copies of [Eyemoon's] films has been addressed to Mail.Ru Group from law enforcement agencies and Italy.” The company only realized there was a problem when users began complaining of accessibility issues on July 17. “We learned of the court’s decision from our users, as well as publications in the public domain,” Mail.ru added. Criticizing the effects of the blockade on its userbase, this morning Mail.ru hit out at Italy for taking action without due consideration. “We believe that this situation is detrimental to the interests of our users, and clearly illustrates the fact that some national laws in this area does not consider the specifics of the Internet companies and do not provide a clear, transparent process for resolving such conflicts,” the company said. “There needs to be an active dialogue on the development of international pre-trial procedures for resolving disputes between copyright holders and Internet service providers. Their introduction will improve the position of all parties, including users worldwide,” Mail.ru concludes. At the time of writing, Mail.ru is still inaccessible in Italy with the company having made no progress towards having the censorship lifted. Source: TorrentFreak
  3. Psiphon Pro By Psiphon Inc. This is the pro version of Psiphon which is a secure VPN application for Android. The application allows you to navigate freely on the internet. You will be connected to all hindered sites that are blocked due to censorship or other factors. You will also be safe when you do this. You will be able to connect to any site that has been exposed to Psyphon Pro and has blocked access. Psiphon’s work structure is quite simple. As with other VPN applications, a tunnel opens and you appear to be connecting through other countries. Whether you want to use the application only on the browser, you can use it in all applications. One of the features that Psiphon has provided is the ability to display your internet traffic. If you want to use the internet for free, Psiphon is for you. Site: https://www58.zippyshare.comSharecode: /v/mQaCFhq8/file.html Site: https://workupload.comSharecode: /file/5mnKbywy
  4. Psiphon Pro By Psiphon Inc. This is the pro version of Psiphon which is a secure VPN application for Android. The application allows you to navigate freely on the internet. You will be connected to all hindered sites that are blocked due to censorship or other factors. You will also be safe when you do this. You will be able to connect to any site that has been exposed to Psyphon Pro and has blocked access. Psiphon’s work structure is quite simple. As with other VPN applications, a tunnel opens and you appear to be connecting through other countries. Whether you want to use the application only on the browser, you can use it in all applications. One of the features that Psiphon has provided is the ability to display your internet traffic. If you want to use the internet for free, Psiphon is for you. Site: https://www52.zippyshare.comSharecode: /v/d24qihdV/file.html Site: https://workupload.comSharecode: /file/EjqUjJ4h
  5. In a New York Times interview, Google CEO Sundar Pichai said when the company follow's Europe's "right to be forgotten" laws, "we are censoring search results because we're complying with the law." Google faced internal and public backlash earlier this year when the Intercept reported the company was working on a censored version of its search engine in China. Europe's "right to be forgotten" laws generally focus on the right to request a company delete personal data in some circumstances, while the Chinese government is known to censor factual historical information. Google CEO Sundar Pichai offered a new justification for the company's exploration of a censored version of its search engine for people in China: it already censors information elsewhere. In a New York Times interview published Thursday, Pichai compared Europe's "right to be forgotten laws" to censorship when asked about launching a search product in China. "One of the things that's not well understood, I think, is that we operate in many countries where there is censorship. When we follow 'right to be forgotten' laws, we are censoring search results because we're complying with the law," Pichai told the Times. Google has been grappling with how it could reach China's 800 million Internet users since it withdrew its service in 2010 amid censorship and security concerns. Earlier this year, Google faced backlash both internally and from the public when the Intercept reported its apparent plans to build a censored version of its search engine in China. Europe's "right to be forgotten" laws are distinct in important ways from censorship of information by the Chinese government. While "right to be forgotten" laws mainly center on the right of individuals to request personal data be deleted from the internet or search results, the Chinese government has been found to suppress factual information that would not be subject to the "right to be forgotten" laws. Through tight control over its media and internet access, China has created the "Great Firewall" that prevents people living there from accessing certain websites or searching some historical events , like the protests at Tiananmen Square in 1989. The "right to be forgotten" came from a 2014 case decided against Google by the European Court of Justice. The case centered around a Spanish man who wanted Google to remove an old newspaper article about a real estate auction the government ordered to recover his social security debts. The court decided that Google had to remove the article from its index even though the newspaper could keep it on its site. Now, the "right to be forgotten" is codified in the European Union's General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), which went into effect earlier this year. Under this part of the regulation, EU citizens have the right to request that internet businesses delete certain personal data under some circumstances . Pichai told the Times he's not convinced a move into China is a top priority. "I'm committed to serving users in China," he said. "Whatever form it takes, I actually don't know the answer. It's not even clear to me that search in China is the product we need to do today." A Google spokesperson did not respond to a request for comment. Source
  6. China’s internet censorship agency has approved a set of regulations for blockchain service providers in the country that will take effect in mid-February. The Cyberspace Administration of China (CAC) published its new “Regulation for Managing Blockchain Information Services” on Thursday, defining blockchain information service providers as “entities or nodes” that offer information services to the public using blockchain technology via desktop sites or mobile apps. The rules become official on February 15, according to the release. Among the 23 articles listed in the document, one requires blockchain service providers to register with the CAC within 10 working days of starting to offer services to the public. The agency also mandates that blockchain startups must register their names, service types, industry fields and server addresses. Further, it bans startups from using blockchain technology to “produce, duplicate, publish, and disseminate” information or content that is prohibited by Chinese laws. If blockchain startups fail to comply with the rules, the CAC said it would first issue a warning, while failure to act within the specified timeline would bring a fine ranging from 5,000 yuan ($737) to 30,000 yuan ($4,422), depending upon the offense. The CAC first published draft rules in October of last year. At that time, one of the articles also recommended that blockchain startups operating in fields such as news reporting, publishing, education and the pharmaceutical industry must also obtain licenses from relevant authorities prior to registration with the CAC. The final rules have dropped this article altogether. Previously, blockchain technology has been utilized to bypass China’s strict internet censorship – often dubbed “The Great Firewall.” For example, as part of the #Metoo movement and a recent pharmaceutical scandal in the country, individuals posted information on the ethereum blockchain to avoid censorship. Source
  7. A new website exposes the extent to which Apple cooperates with Chinese government internet censorship, blocking access to Western news sources, information about human rights and religious freedoms, and privacy-enhancing apps that would circumvent the country’s pervasive online surveillance regime. The new site, AppleCensorship.com, allows users to check which apps are not accessible to people in China through Apple’s app store, indicating those that have been banned. It was created by researchers at GreatFire.org, an organization that monitors Chinese government internet censorship. In late 2017, Apple admitted to U.S. senators that it had removed from its app store in China more than 600 “virtual private network” apps that allow users to evade censorship and online spying. But the company never disclosed which specific apps it removed — nor did it reveal other services it had pulled from its app store at the behest of China’s authoritarian government. In addition to the hundreds of VPN apps, Apple is currently preventing its users in China from downloading apps from news organizations, including the New York Times, Radio Free Asia, Tibetan News, and Voice of Tibet. It is also blocking censorship circumvention tools like Tor and Psiphon; Google’s search app and Google Earth; an app called Bitter Winter, which provides information about human rights and religious freedoms in China; and an app operated by the Central Tibetan Authority, which provides information about Tibetan human rights and social issues. Some bans – such as those of certain VPN apps and the Times – have received media coverage in the past, but many never generate news headlines. Charlie Smith, a co-founder of GreatFire.org, told The Intercept that the group was motivated to launch the website because “Apple provides little transparency into what it censors in its app store. Most developers find out their app has been censored after they see a drop in China traffic and try to figure out of there is a problem. We wanted to bring transparency to what they are censoring.” Smith, who said that the website was still in a beta phase of early development, added that until now, it was not easy to check exactly which apps Apple had removed from its app stores in different parts of the world. For example, he said, “now we can see that the top 100 VPN apps in the U.S. app store are all not available in the China app store.” The site is not able to distinguish between apps taken down due to requests from the Chinese government because they violate legal limits on free expression versus those removed because they violate other laws, such as those regulating gambling. However, it is possible to determine from the content of each app – and whether it continues to be available in the U.S. or elsewhere – the likely reason for its removal. Radio Free Asia, for instance, has been subject to censorship for decades in China. The Washington, D.C.-based organization, which is funded by the U.S. government, regularly reports on human rights abuses in China and has had its broadcasts jammed and blocked in the country since the late 1990s. That censorship has also extended to the internet – now with the support of Apple. Rohit Mahajan, a spokesman for Radio Free Asia, told The Intercept that Apple had informed the organization in December last year that one of its apps was removed from the app store in China because it did not meet “legal requirements” there. “There was no option to appeal, as far as we could discern,” said Mahajan. Libby Liu, Radio Free Asia’s president, added that “shutting down avenues for credible, outside news organizations is a loss – not just for us, but for the millions who rely on our reports and updates for a different picture than what’s presented in state-controlled media. I would hope that Western companies would be committed to Western values when it comes to making decisions that could impact that access.” An Apple spokesperson declined to address removals of specific apps from China, but pointed to the company’s app store review guidelines, which state: “Apps must comply with all legal requirements in any location where you make them available.” The spokesperson said that Apple, in its next transparency report, is planning to release information on government requests to remove apps from its app store. The Chinese government expects Western companies to make concessions before it permits them to gain access to the country’s lucrative market of more than 800 million internet users. The concessions include compliance with the ruling Communist Party’s sweeping censorship and surveillance regime. In recent years, the Chinese state has beefed up its repressive powers. It has introduced a new “data localization” law, for instance, which forces all internet and communication companies to store Chinese users’ data on the country’s mainland — making it more accessible to Chinese authorities. In accordance with the data localization law, Apple agreed to a deal with state-owned China Telecom to control and store Chinese users’ iCloud data. Apple claims that it retains control of the encryption keys to the data, ensuring that people’s photographs and other private information cannot be accessed by the Chinese state. However, human rights groups remain concerned. Amnesty International has previously stated, “By handing over its China iCloud service to a local company without sufficient safeguards, the Chinese authorities now have potentially unfettered access to all Apple’s Chinese customers’ iCloud data. Apple knows it, yet has not warned its customers in China of the risks.” Apple CEO Tim Cook has presented himself as a defender of users’ privacy. During a speech in October last year, Cook declared, “We at Apple believe that privacy is a fundamental human right.” It is unclear how Cook reconciles that sentiment with Apple’s removal of privacy-enhancing software from its app store in China, which helps ensure that the country’s government can continue to monitor its citizens and crack down on opponents. Cook appears to have viewed compliance with Chinese censorship and surveillance as worthwhile compromises. “We would obviously rather not remove the apps,” he said in 2017, “but like we do in other countries we follow the law wherever we do business. … We’re hopeful that over time the restrictions we’re seeing are lessened, because innovation really requires freedom to collaborate and communicate.” Source
  8. Psiphon Pro By Psiphon Inc. This is the pro version of Psiphon which is a secure VPN application for Android. The application allows you to navigate freely on the internet. You will be connected to all hindered sites that are blocked due to censorship or other factors. You will also be safe when you do this. You will be able to connect to any site that has been exposed to Psyphon Pro and has blocked access. Psiphon’s work structure is quite simple. As with other VPN applications, a tunnel opens and you appear to be connecting through other countries. Whether you want to use the application only on the browser, you can use it in all applications. One of the features that Psiphon has provided is the ability to display your internet traffic. If you want to use the internet for free, Psiphon is for you. Site: https://workupload.com Sharecode: /file/twX2cTvJ Site: https://file.bz Sharecode: /UcD2R2rfb2/Psiphon_Pro_214_apk
  9. Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla., sent a letter to Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin Wednesday requesting the Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States to look into the China-based owner of TikTok's 2017 acquisition of Musical.ly. Rubio claimed there is "growing evidence" that TikTok's U.S. platform is censoring content. Rubio's request comes as the NBA is grappling with controversy over its ties to China. Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla., will ask U.S. authorities to investigate the 2017 acquisition of Musical.ly by TikTok, accusing the China-based app of censorship. Rubio announced his plans in a tweet on Wednesday, and letter sent a letter to Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin requesting the Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States (CFIUS) to look into "national security implications" of the deal. "These Chinese-owned apps are increasingly being used to censor content and silence open discussion on topics deemed sensitive by the Chinese Government and Communist Party," Rubio wrote in his letter to Mnuchin. "There continues to be ample and growing evidence that TikTok's platform for Western markets, including the U.S., is censoring content that is not in line with the Chinese Government and Communist Party directives." Rubio claimed TikTok suppresses speech on sensitive topics to Chinese officials, like Tiananmen Square, Hong Kong and Tawiwan. In a tweet Tuesday, Rubio he said he also asked the Trump administration "to fully enforce anti-boycott laws that prohibit any U.S. person — including U.S. subsidiaries of Chinese companies from complying with foreign boycotts seeking to coerce U.S. companies to conform with #China's government views." In a statement, a TikTok spokesperson said, "TikTok US is localized, adheres to US laws, and stores all US user data in the US. Our content and moderation policies are led by our US-based team and are not influenced by any foreign government. The Chinese government does not request that TikTok censor content, and would not have jurisdiction regardless, as TikTok does not operate there." The letter comes as the relationship between China and U.S. corporations is under a microscope. The National Basketball Association became embroiled in an international dispute after Houston Rockets general manager Daryl Morey tweeted a message in support of anti-Chinese government protests in Hong Kong over the weekend. While the NBA initially released a statement saying it had "great respect for the history and culture of China," commissioner Adam Silver later said the NBA is not in the place to "adjudicate" between different viewpoints. As of Wednesday, 11 of 13 Chinese businesses listed as official partners on the NBA China website have distanced themselves from the NBA, CNBC reported. TikTok has quickly become one of the most popular social media apps worldwide, especially among Gen Z users. The app, owned by the Chinese company ByteDance, features user-generated videos set to a variety of songs accessible through the app. Unlike other popular social media apps like Facebook-owned Instagram, TikTok's feed of videos is not based on users following specific accounts, but rather relies more heavily on its algorithm to learn user interests. The app was molded from ByteDance's 2017 acquisition of Musical.ly, a lip-syncing app developed in China that also had a large following in the U.S. At the time, TechCrunch reported that the deal was worth up to $1 billion. ByteDance ultimately folded Musical.ly's brand into TikTok to reflect its wider range of content. TikTok is not the only Chinese app that has gained traction among U.S. users. Apps developed by Chinese companies or those with large Chinese investors brought in revenues of $674.8 million in the U.S. in the first quarter of 2019, according to data previously compiled by Sensor Tower for CNBC. "PUBG Mobile" and "Clash of Clans," two games made respectively by Chinese company Tencent and one of its subsdiaries, have also gained a large U.S. following. TikTok recently announced it would not allow paid political ads on its platform, saying it did not fit into its overall experience. A U.S. investigation would add to government scrutiny from the U.K. which launched an investigation into whether TIkTok violated Europe's General Data Protection Regulation. Source
  10. KUALA LUMPUR: The authorities should consider introducing a law to regulate the contents of films and programmes provided through digital platforms, particularly Video on Demand (VOD) or video streaming providers, said National Film Development Corporation Malaysia (Finas). Finas CEO Ahmad Idham Ahmad Nadzri said the introduction of such a law was necessary as digital contents from providers such as Netflix, which has a wider network compared to local television, were uncensored. “The development of our children’s minds is still at risk if we only control the contents of local media platforms while the online contents of international programmes are accessible to all. “This contradicts Finas’ direction in producing contents laden with good values,” he told reporters after officiating a seminar on families’ well-being here today. Idham said Finas had raised this issue during its meeting with the Film Censorship Board. Meanwhile, he said Finas is planning to hold more awareness programmes for industry players that emphasise the importance of mutual responsibility in broadcasting contents that can stimulate the minds of the people. Source: Finas calls for law to regulate contents on Netflix and VOD (via Free Malaysia Today) p/s: FINAS is National Film Development Corporation of Malaysia, which is similar to the Motion Picture Association of America in the United States.
  11. Datuk Norman Abdul Halim, president and CEO of KRU Group of Companies has a different solution in regards to recent news which Finas calls for law to regulate contents on Netflix and VOD. On Nov 16, Bernama reported that National Film Development Corporation Malaysia (Finas) CEO Ahmad Idham Ahmad Nadzri saying that the authorities should consider introducing a law to regulate the contents on digital platforms. The article mentioned that Finas had brought up the issue during a meeting with Film Censorship Board (LPF). Idham was quoted in the article: “The development of our children’s minds is still at risk if we only control the contents of local media platforms while the online contents of international programmes are accessible to all. “This contradicts Finas’ direction in producing contents laden with good values.” However Norman doesn’t fully agree with Finas’ stand. He told The Star: “In the era of global distribution of content, any form of censorship is no longer relevant. “Even censorship by LPF for cinema releases in Malaysia should be reviewed and transformed into rating system whereby viewers are fully aware of what they are about to watch. This applies to Netflix and any other OTT players too. “As long as subscribers are aware on what they are about to watch, they can make informed decisions to consume the content or otherwise. “What Finas can do is to support the local content industry by creating tax incentives to attract investors to increase the budget of Malaysian-made content so that we will be able to compete with the world’s best.” In a report in The Star yesterday (Nov 17), Ahmad Idham clarified that he had only proposed for a collaboration between Finas and National Council of Women's Organisations to organise a forum or seminar to debate the issue in the context to strengthen digital content in the future. He said on Twitter: "I said I took note of complaints raised by parents in the cyber era who asked about uncensored content.” Source: Censorship in any form no longer relevant, says Datuk Norman of KRU (via The Star Online)
  12. JAKARTA: Indonesia will meet social media companies to discuss its plans to impose fines of up to around US$36,000 (RM148,914) if they allow pornography, violence or other "negative" content on their platforms, a communications ministry official said. The South-East Asian country aims to push firms to better monitor and delete content the authorities deem obscene, Semuel Abrijani Pangerapan, the ministry's director of information applications, said late Nov 5. He told Reuters the ministry would issue a regulation governing the mechanism for fines following discussions with the companies. The fines could go into effect in 2021. "The point of this is that control of content will no longer be the job of the government," Pangerapan said by telephone, adding that he would invite companies including Google Facebook and Twitter. Representatives of Twitter and Facebook did not immediately respond to requests for comment. At an earlier press conference, he said "negative" content could include pornography or radicalism, and fines could range from 100mil rupiah (RM29,500) to 500mil rupiah (RM147,504). The move comes amid wider regional efforts by South-East Asian governments to demand action from global tech giants on content regulation and tax policy. The stakes are high for governments, which are counting on the digital economy to drive growth amid domestic political tensions, and Internet companies, which view South-East Asia's social-media-loving population of 641 million as a key growth market. Indonesia is a top-five market globally for US tech giants Facebook and Twitter. Authorities have succeeded in getting social media companies Telegram and TikTok to establish content monitoring teams in Indonesia after briefly banning them over "negative content". Communications ministry officials told Reuters in August they were working on a "three-letter system," meaning that if a platform fails to respond to three government requests to engage on an issue, then it would be banned from Indonesia. Indonesia has already blocked more than 70,000 websites displaying "negative content" such as pornography or extremist ideology in 2018 using a so-called "crawling system" that automatically searches internet content and issues alerts when inappropriate material is found. The country's Internet economy is the largest and fastest-growing in the region, on track to cross the US$130bil (RM537.74bil) mark by 2025, according to a report by Google, Singapore state investor Temasek Holdings and global business consultants Bain & Company. Source: Indonesia to meet social media firms as it eyes ‘negative content’ fines (via The Star Online)
  13. "SOCIAL MEDIA PLATFORMS should advance FREEDOM OF SPEECH," White House says. Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Donald Trump has long accused social media platforms like Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube of political bias. On Wednesday, his White House launched a new online form that allows members of the public to report political bias in their content moderation decisions. "SOCIAL MEDIA PLATFORMS should advance FREEDOM OF SPEECH," the form says (capitalization in the original, of course). "Yet too many Americans have seen their accounts suspended, banned, or fraudulently reported for unclear 'violations' of user policies. No matter your views, if you suspect political bias caused such an action to be taken against you, share your story with President Trump." The form asks users to provide their name and basic demographic and contact information. Users then provide details about the content that was censored and can provide screenshots of messages from social media companies about moderation decisions. The form also collects respondents' email addresses and asks for permission to add users to White House newsletters. Respondents are also asked to accept a user agreement that gives the Trump Administration a broad license to use the information, including publishing it. The form singles out four social media platforms by name: Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, and YouTube. Users can also choose "other" and type in another platform. As these platforms have become more prominent, they have faced harsh criticism from both sides of the political spectrum. Liberals have attacked them for being too slow to block online harassment and hate speech. Social media companies have responded by beefing up their moderation efforts—but that has caused conservatives to worry about mainstream conservative content getting swept up in the dragnet. Last month Vice reported on a recent internal discussion at Twitter addressing this very issue. During an all-hands meeting, someone asked why the platform doesn't use automated tools to remove white supremacist content the way it has for ISIS propaganda. A Twitter employee who works on the issue reportedly said that one reason was that filters designed to identify white supremacist accounts could also catch the accounts of some Republican politicians. The latest White House initiative ratchets up the pressure on social media companies from the right, encouraging them to tread lightly as they consider more aggressive moderation of far-right content. Source: White House unveils new tool to report censorship by social media giants (Ars Technica)
  14. Psiphon Pro By Psiphon Inc. This is the pro version of Psiphon which is a secure VPN application for Android. The application allows you to navigate freely on the internet. You will be connected to all hindered sites that are blocked due to censorship or other factors. You will also be safe when you do this. You will be able to connect to any site that has been exposed to Psyphon Pro and has blocked access. Psiphon’s work structure is quite simple. As with other VPN applications, a tunnel opens and you appear to be connecting through other countries. Whether you want to use the application only on the browser, you can use it in all applications. One of the features that Psiphon has provided is the ability to display your internet traffic. If you want to use the internet for free, Psiphon is for you. Site: https://workupload.com Sharecode: /file/xv2cRNKM
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