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  1. Changes may help devs handle inflation, exchange rates, and new content types. The backs of the iPhone 14, iPhone 14 Pro, and iPhone 14 Pro Max. A new pricing cheat sheet provided by Apple. Apple unveiled the most sweeping change yet to the App Store pricing model it applies to all apps submitted to its app stores on Tuesday. In the new system, app developers will have substantially more control over how they price their apps. Apple's App Store has a history of offering relatively limited price point options to app and game developers. With the new policies, the minimum app price has dropped from $0.99 to $0.29, and the maximum has risen from $1,000 to $10,000. Prices can include $0.10, $0.50, $1, $5, $10, and $100. Supported conventions include X.99, X.00, X.90, and X.95. Here's Apple's specific wording: Under the updated App Store pricing system, all developers will have the ability to select from 900 price points, which is nearly 10 times the number of price points previously available for most apps. This includes 600 new price points to choose from, with an additional 100 higher price points available upon request. To provide developers around the world with even more flexibility, price points—which will start as low as $0.29 and, upon request, go up to $10,000—will offer an enhanced selection of price points, increasing incrementally across price ranges (for example, every $0.10 up to $10; every $0.50 between $10 and $50; etc.). See the table below for details. The prices can be set on a per-country basis. This allows developers to respond to inflation and shifts in exchange rates. Developers can set a base price for a storefront and currency they know well, and they will see autogenerated suggestions for prices for other regions and currencies—which they can either accept or replace with their own chosen prices. Apps that offer auto-renewable subscriptions will be able to leverage these changes starting today. Developers of apps that don't have subscriptions will have to wait until an unspecified date in the spring of 2023. Before now, most changes to the App Store's pricing system were additions of new types of charges, whether expanded in-app purchases or subscription models. Beyond those additions, this is the most substantial change to the App Store's pricing model and policies since it launched. Several forces paved the way or contributed to this change. In 2021, Apple agreed to loosen pricing restrictions in the wake of a class-action suit by a coalition of third-party developers. More broadly, the company has faced intense regulatory scrutiny by lawmakers and public criticism by developers. Like many other recent App Store policy changes, this shift may be an attempt to preempt future crackdowns. The changes have also been made to help Apple and the developers in its ecosystem grapple with a recent volatile economic landscape, with higher-than-usual inflation and exchange rate fluctuations. It's also possible that Apple is introducing these new prices to prepare for new types of content, tools, and experiences that may be sold for its upcoming mixed reality headset, which will likely launch in 2023. Listing image by Samuel Axon Apple announces sweeping changes to App Store pricing
  2. The Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Company (TSMC) will also make 4nm chips at its semiconductor fab in Arizona, when it opens in 2024, according to Bloomberg. The supply has been fueled by demand from customers like Apple, which alone makes up to 25% of TSMC's total revenue. The new plan is expected to be announced when President Joe Biden and Commerce Secretary Gina Raimondo will visit Phoenix, Arizona. Previously, TSMC had stated that it will produce 5nm chips at its facility in the US. Apple is planning to source part of its huge demand of chips from the Arizona plant. The company's CEO Tim Cook is also scheduled to attend the event next week. Out of the 20,000 wafers per month that TSMC will make at its Arizona facility, Apple is expected to use about one-third of the output. The chip making company has also planned another fabrication nearby the originally planned one that will be able to produce even more advanced 3nm chips and is expected to start manufacturing in 2025. Apple is already in line to be one of the first takers of TSMC's 2nm chips as well. Due to the supply chain disruptions and trade war with China, more companies are trying to bring production to Europe and the US. The US passed the Chips and Science Act earlier this year which will offer around $50 billion worth of incentives for companies that will manufacture semiconductors in the country. TSMC is likely to receive billions in subsidies. Source: Bloomberg TSMC plans to manufacture 4nm chips at Arizona facility due to increasing demand from Apple
  3. In a series of tweets, Elon Musk has alleged that Apple is threatening to bar Twitter from its App Store and squarely blamed it for taking down most of its ad spend on Twitter. The billionaire CEO tweeted that Apple is threatening to withhold the social media platform from its App Store but won’t explain the rationale behind doing so. Apple did not respond to Musk's complaints. Some believe it may be due to his recent decision of reinstating previously banned accounts, including that of former president Donald TrumpIn another series of tweets, Musk waged a war of words over Apple’s misuse of its market power in forcing the app makers to pay 30 percent fees from the app's sales, which primarily come from Twitter Blue. Prior to him, Epic Games, the maker of Fortnite, and the music service Spotify had raised similar objections about Apple’s decision to take a large cut from their sales. The Twitter owner had claimed recently that the platform was witnessing record-high engagement with him at the helm, however, his approach towards laying off employees had startled the company's major moneymaker, the advertisers. In recent weeks, a large majority of brands had pulled their ads from the platform due to concerns around moderation. This resulted in a massive drop in ad revenue as a vast majority of Twitter's revenue comes from advertising. Elon Musk hints at going to war with Apple
  4. The finding exposes the difference between the privacy policy you may think you’re covered under and the privacy policy that’s actually being applied. The detailed analytics data Apple records about what you do in the App Store can be tied directly to your Apple account, according to app development and research team Mysk. In a Twitter thread, Mysk shows that Apple sends what’s known as a “Directory Services Identifier” along with its App Store analytics info and argues that the identifier is also tied to your iCloud account, linking your name, email address, and more. The thread also notes that the data is still sent even if you turn off device analytics in settings, and that Apple sends your DSID in other apps as well. In the last tweet in the thread, Mysk says: “You just need to know three things: 1- The App Store sends detailed analytics about you to Apple. 2- There’s no way to stop it. 3- Analytics data are directly linked to you.” Apple didn’t immediately respond to The Verge’s request for comment on whether it’s actually linking personal info to this sort of analytics data, but let’s take a look at what its own privacy policies have to say about the matter. Spoiler alert: it may be surprising but not necessarily damning (at least in terms of Apple breaking its own rules). In its thread, Mysk points to a line in Apple’s device analytics and privacy document, which reads: “None of the collected information identifies you personally. Personal data is either not logged at all, is subject to privacy preserving techniques such as differential privacy, or is removed from any reports before they’re sent to Apple.” There are a couple of things worth noting about this; one is that later on in the document, Apple does say that it “may correlate some usage data about Apple apps” across devices that are signed into the same iCloud account but that it does so in a way that won’t let the company identify you. More importantly, though, is that Apple has a separate set of rules about how it tracks you in the App Store (and in Apple News and Stocks, where it also shows ads). And in that document, Apple fully admits that it’s tracking you, personally. I recommend checking out the whole thing, but the first section is enough to show that this is a very different policy than the device analytics one. Perhaps the most relevant line reads (emphasis mine): “To find ways to improve the stores, we use information about your browsing, purchases, searches, and downloads. These records are stored with IP address, a random unique identifier (where that arises), and Apple ID when you are signed in to the App Store or other Apple online stores.” Apple also lays out some examples of exactly what information it’s collecting: “when you open or close the App Store, what content you search for, the content you view and download, and your interactions with App Store push notifications as well as messages from the App Store within apps.” In other words: the eye of Apple is monitoring pretty much everything you do in the App Store. The policy also reveals the slightly worrying amount of personal info and data that Apple collects for its app recommendations and advertisements, though it is worth noting that there are controls for those that let you turn off or limit data collection. But that’s doesn’t seem to be the case for the App Store improvement analytics; the full “Improving the Stores” section makes no mention of any settings that would let you keep Apple from seeing that info. Of course, users might assume that turning off device analytics while they’re setting up their phone would stop this sort of data collection. And who can blame them; Apple touts its privacy chops all the time, and turning that option off is supposed to deprive Apple of “data about how you use your devices and applications.” But what it doesn’t say is that applications themselves can do all sorts of tracking outside that system; hence almost all of Apple’s apps having their own privacy agreements (which you implicitly agree to by using them). Apple gets a lot of scrutiny around its privacy policies, as it should — you don’t get to make a billboard that says “what happens on your iPhone, stays on your iPhone” and constantly bray about how much you care about privacy without inviting some skepticism. But that scrutiny has increased as Apple has very publicly turned the screws on how other powerful advertising companies can collect user data on its platforms and as it seems set to make ads a bigger part of its business. And while it doesn’t seem like what Mysk turned up doesn’t necessarily seem to break Apple’s rules (though disclaimer: I am neither a lawyer nor do I have access to the full set of data Mysk captured), I do think a lot of its users would be surprised at how much tracking it’s doing, given how much energy the company spends on touting itself as a company that’s all about privacy. iOS developers say Apple’s App Store analytics aren’t anonymous
  5. The device could be announced as soon as January. Apple is wrapping up development of its long-rumored, long-delayed mixed reality headset, and is gearing up for a launch as soon as early next year, according to Bloomberg reporter Mark Gurman's weekly newsletter. Recent job listings posted by Apple suggest that the company is looking to fill content creation roles for the device, suggesting that the core technology is set enough that developers, producers, artists, and the like work confidently with it. That's in contrast to the product's state not that long ago, when differing opinions about the product's feature set, specs, and design led to shifting goalposts that would have been a headache for content creators. Among those content creation roles is at least one that would focus on "the development of a 3D mixed-reality world," not dissimilar in some respects to Meta's Horizon Worlds. But while Horizon Worlds' spaces exist entirely in VR, an Apple job listing describes "connected experiences in a 3D mixed-reality world," suggesting that augmented reality may also play a part. The newsletter speculates, based on some of the job listings, that Apple plans to introduce a video service for the headset, building off of the company's prior acquisition of NextVR. Additionally, Apple moved key staff to the mixed reality product team, including a former self-driving car staffer and a senior engineer. Gurman also recapped many of the things already leaked or reported by him, The Information, and other credible sources: The headset will have more than 10 cameras across both the inside and the outside; it will have "the highest-resolution displays ever featured in a mass-market headset"; and it will run a new operating system called realityOS, which will include mixed reality versions of Messages, Maps, FaceTime, and other apps. He also says it will be called either "Reality Pro" or "Reality One" and that it will cost between $2,000 and $3,000—much more expensive than most consumer VR headsets. The newsletter didn't name a more specific release window than "next year," but analyst Ming-Chi Kuo said the device could be announced as soon as January with a launch in time for Apple's June developer conference. DigiTimes previously reported Apple might begin production in March. Report: Apple’s mixed reality headset is just a few months away
  6. Apple has released the macOS Ventura 13.0.1, iOS 16.1.1 and iPadOS 16.1.1 for all users. The updates patch two security vulnerabilities in the operating systems. What's new in macOS Ventura 13.0.1, iOS 16.1.1 and iPadOS 16.1.1 The Cupertino company has credited three security researchers of the Google Project Zero team for discovering the vulnerabilities. According to the release notes published on Apple's website, both issues are related to libxml2, which is a library that is used for parsing XML and HTML files. So these vulnerabilities affect other operating systems as well, including Linux distros. The first issue, which has been identified as CVE-2022-40303, could allow a remote user attackers to terminate an app or execute arbitrary code. Apple says it fixed the issue by addressing an integer overflow through improved input validation. The other issue, filed as CVE-2022-40304, could have a similar impact, i.e. an attack can cause an unexpected app termination or remote code execution. The vulnerability was mitigated by improving some checks. You can find the original reports by the security experts here: 1 and 2. Usually, when such vulnerabilities have been exploited by threat actors, Apple mentions it in the security update documentation to educate users about potential risks. These two security issues, however, don't have that warning, which means that no known attacks have been reported. That doesn't mean you should skip the update, macOS 13.0.1 is the first update that has rolled out since macOS Ventura was released a few weeks ago. The firmware build number is 22A400. If you haven't updated to the new operating system yet, you may want to read our previous articles to learn about the new features in macOS 13. For those who are still finding their way around the new System Settings, you can check for updates manually by going to the General > Software Update page. The iOS 16.1.1 update is available for the iPhone 8 and later, while the iPadOS 16.1.1 update is available for all iPad Pro models, iPad Air 3rd generation and later, iPad 5th generation and later, and the iPad Mini 5th generation and later. Apple is yet to patch the vulnerabilities for devices that are running on iOS 15, iPadOS 15, macOS Big Sur and Monterey. This is not unusual, the company releases security updates for legacy devices a few days after patching the current versions of the operating systems. You can keep an eye on Apple's security updates page to see if an update is available for your iPhone, iPad or Mac. You will also find the release notes for iOS 16.1.1, iPados 16.1.1, along with the change log for macOS 13.0.1 on the same page. I noticed a minor bug in the Settings app's Software Update section, it showed that the macOS 13.0.1 update is about 606 MB in size. But, the actual download size that was reported by the updater was more than double of that, at around 1.46 GB. I haven't come across any other issues in macOS Ventura, and I've been using it since the first Dev build was released. That said, Apple seems to have improved the installation process for the updates, it's noticeably faster now. My MacBook Air was ready to use in a few minutes after a restart to complete the process. That's quite impressive, as it usually took 10-20 minutes even for minor updates to be installed on macOS Monterey. Have you updated your device? Apple releases macOS Ventura 13.0.1, iOS 16.1.1 and iPadOS 16.1.1 to patch two security issues
  7. Lawsuit claims Amazon and Apple benefited from fewer vendors, higher prices. In early 2018, there were more than 600 companies you could buy Apple products from on Amazon's marketplace, including independent refurbishers, usually at lower prices than Apple's own. By July 2019, there were only seven, and a class-action lawsuit says that was the result of an unlawful agreement between the tech giants. The lawsuit (PDF) was filed Wednesday in federal court in Seattle by law firm Hagens Berman on behalf of Steven Floyd. Floyd is a Pennsylvania man who bought an iPad on Amazon for $320 in early 2021 and was denied "a lower price which would have been the case in a normal competitive market," the suit alleges. Hagens Berman should be a familiar name to Apple's counsel and close watchers of the company's legal history. The firm sued Apple over scratched iPod nano cases in 2005 and ebook price-fixing in 2011 and brokered a settlement for smaller iOS developers in the App Store in 2021. Hagens Berman was also involved in a complicated lawsuit involving iOS touchscreen patents that involved Apple accusing the firm of secretly leaning on an "extra attorney." The suit largely concerns Apple and Amazon's agreement in November 2018, one widely reported, that allowed Amazon to directly sell Apple products through its marketplace, while also requiring any other firm to get Apple's permission to sell its products on the site after January 2019. This had the effect of killing a major outlet for refurbished Apple goods, which tend to hold their value much better in used and refurbished form than most other electronics. It was also, the suit claims, "an unlawful horizontal agreement between Apple and Amazon to eliminate or at least severely reduce the competitive threat posed by third-party merchants." That agreement is "naked restraint" and unlawful under the Sherman Act, the suit claims. The benefits to this collusion, according to the suit, were that Amazon received "consistent supplies at a discount of up to 10%" if it kept unauthorized resellers off its store and instantly became the leading vendor of Apple products on its site. Apple, meanwhile, eliminated the "active price competition" that was undercutting its own retail prices, the suit alleges. Prior to the agreement, discounted prices for iPhones and iPads from third-party vendors on Amazon could be 20 percent or more, an attorney for Hagens Berman stated in a blog post. Amazon's ability to "win" the "Buy Box"—to be the default vendor for Apple products when a customer buys or adds a product to their cart—shot up after it agreed to let Apple choose authorized resellers, according to a class action lawsuit. The class-action lawsuit claims that Apple's goal in restricting third-party resale of its products was to keep prices high. This graph purports to show the success of what the lawsuit claims were unlawful actions. Key to the lawsuit's claims are that reducing the number of sellers on Amazon allowed Apple to eliminate cheaper prices for its products, sometimes discounted by as much as 20 percent. This same agreement has previously drawn fines from Italy's competition authority for restricting the firms that can sell Beats headphones in Amazon's Italian store. Neither Apple nor Amazon has addressed the lawsuit's claims as of this writing. Hagens Berman is seeking people who bought an iPhone or iPad from Amazon through the standard "Buy Box" to enroll in its class. Damages were not specified in the suit, though it seeks a jury trial and numerous forms of injunctive relief under antitrust statutes. Apple and Amazon colluded to raise iPhone and iPad prices, class action claims
  8. We probably won’t see the upgraded MacBook Pros this year Apple’s new M2-equipped 14- and 16-inch MacBook Pros may not arrive until early next year, according to a report from Bloomberg’s Mark Gurman. While previous rumors suggested Apple could release the upgraded devices by the end of this year, now Gurman believes they’ll launch in the first half of March. As noted by Gurman, this release window would allow Apple to launch the new MacBooks around the same the macOS Ventura 13.3 and iOS 16.3 updates come out, which are expected sometime between early February and March. This prediction aligns with Ming-Chi Kuo's tweet from August that suggests Apple could release the new MacBook Pros early next year, as well as a recent rumor from Korean leaker Lanzuk (yeux1122), which also indicates the new MacBook Pros will arrive in March. Gurman cites Apple’s recent earnings call as further evidence that the upgraded line of MacBook Pros isn’t coming this year. During the call, Apple CEO Tim Cook says the company’s product lineup is “set” for the holiday season, while chief financial officer Luca Maestri says he expects Mac revenue to “decline substantially” in December, potentially because Apple doesn’t plan on releasing a new MacBook Pro this year. When Apple released the new 14- and 16-inch MacBook Pros last October, the devices added $10.9 billion in Mac revenue, and it doesn’t seem like Apple’s expecting the same trend this year. The upgraded 14- and 16-inch MacBook Pros aren’t expected to come with any major design changes, but they’ll likely feature the more powerful M2 Pro and M2 Max processors. According to Gurman, the M2 Max chip is rumored to feature 12 CPU cores and up to 38 GPU cores, an upgrade from the 10 CPU cores and up to 32 GPU cores in the M1 Max. While Apple released its 13-inch MacBook Pro in June, it comes with the base M2 chip (also included in the new MacBook Air), featuring eight CPU cores and up to 10 GPU cores. Apple’s 14- and 16-inch MacBook Pros might not arrive until next March
  9. Apple has released information about its fiscal 2022 fourth quarter, which ended September 24, 2022. Despite the grim economic backdrop, the company saw record quarter revenue of $90.1 billion, up 8% compared to the same period year-over-year. It also saw annual revenues of $394.3 billion, which was also up 8% year-over-year. In addition to a good financial report, the company said its active installation base of devices reached all-time highs for all major product categories. Commenting the on the data, Luca Maestri, Apple’s CFO, said: “Our record September quarter results continue to demonstrate our ability to execute effectively in spite of a challenging and volatile macroeconomic backdrop. We continued to invest in our long-term growth plans, generated over $24 billion in operating cash flow, and returned over $29 billion to our shareholders during the quarter. The strength of our ecosystem, unmatched customer loyalty, and record sales spurred our active installed base of devices to a new all-time high. This quarter capped another record-breaking year for Apple, with revenue growing over $28 billion and operating cash flow up $18 billion versus last year.” For those holding shares in the company, Apple said that it will pay out a cash dividend of $0.23 per share of the company’s common stock. You must be holding Apple stock by November 7 to receive the cash dividend on November 10. Going forward, Apple CEO Tim Cook appears bullish on the company’s prospects. He said that Apple is heading into the holiday season with its most powerful line-up ever, while sticking to principles such as preserving privacy and protecting the environment. Only time will tell if fans remain dedicated to the brand despite all the economic issues. Source: Apple Despite the economy, Apple saw a great fiscal fourth quarter
  10. Pushing more ads at users would compensate for slowing smartphone sales but risks annoying Apple fans—and antitrust regulators. There’s a side to Apple most iPhone owners don’t know. There's Apple the hardware company, the one that has spent the past several weeks showing off new phones, a more rugged Apple Watch and some confusing new iPads. Then there’s the other, quieter Apple, focused on something of a dirty word: advertising. And that part of Apple is getting bigger by the day. Apple has sold ads inside Apple News and the App Store since 2016 but in recent months has shown a new determination to muscle into an industry dominated by Google, Meta, and Amazon. In June, Apple expanded the ways companies could pay to get in front of its customers’ eyeballs, allowing them to buy ads on the front page of the App Store. In August, Apple job postings suggested it was building a self-service platform for businesses to book ads to be served to customers through Apple products. This month, reports surfaced that Apple was courting potential buyers for ads on Apple TV+. What form those ads would take, such as pre-roll spots like those on YouTube or traditional TV commercials, is unclear. Those moves all suggest Apple’s users will begin to see more ads inside its services and that the company will shift into more direct competition with ad-supported rivals such as Google and Meta. “Everybody’s been letting Google and then Facebook take all this money,” says Michael Cusumano, a professor at MIT Sloan School of Management. “For Apple to step in and say ‘I want a piece of this too’ kind of makes sense.” With smartphone innovation barely budging and sales slowing, it also makes sense that Apple would chase alternative sources of revenue. The company’s expanding subscription business in news, video streaming, and fitness scratch the same growth-hungry corporate itch. Cusumano believes Apple may have been partly inspired by the success of Amazon’s ad business, which displays adverts for products alongside search results. It has grown more than tenfold since 2016, reaching $31 billion in revenue in 2021. Insider Intelligence, a market research firm, estimates that Apple brings in $4 billion a year from ads. Apple’s ad adventure risks irking loyal customers. Pushing paid messages on people is a break from the company’s usual pact with consumers, who have been trained over decades to pay steep prices for Apple products that present a refined, if closed-off, experience. CEO Tim Cook has previously argued that ad-driven business models are inherently invasive of privacy, seemingly in reference to Google and Meta. Apple’s recent interest in ads has also drawn antitrust scrutiny, due to a privacy feature added to iOS that has damaged digital ad revenues at its Big Tech rivals. Apple’s App Tracking Transparency, or ATT, introduced in April last year, requires people to opt in to sharing data that companies such as Meta use to track users online. One third-party estimate believes that Meta has lost $13 billion in ad revenue as a result of the changes. German regulators are investigating the feature as potentially anticompetitive, because Apple’s personalized ads, which can be targeted by age and gender, aren’t subject to the same rules. Apple spokesperson Shane Bauer declined to answer WIRED’s questions on how the company’s business is changing, the role of advertising in that, or whether ATT was related to its ad plans. “A user’s data belongs to them, and they should get to decide whether to share their data and with whom,” Bauer says. ATT’s rules apply equally to all developers, including Apple, he says, and the company “never tracks users.” That doesn’t mean Apple's existing ad revenue won't keep growing. “It definitely could become a significant part of their business,” says Peter Newman, director of forecasting at Insider Intelligence, who specializes in tracking Apple. “They want to make themselves significantly less dependent on pure hardware sales.” Newman points to monthly subscription services such as Apple Music and Apple TV+ as places that would comfortably accommodate ads. The company’s video streaming service is notable, he says, because after Netflix’s launch of an ad-supported tier, Apple is now one of the only major video streaming services without an ad-supported version. (In April, Apple signed a deal that would serve ads on Major League Baseball coverage through the streaming service, though those ads were sold by MLB, not Apple). How big Apple’s ad business could become is far from certain. Newman sees plenty of room for growth but can’t see the company rivaling the largest digital ad giants. “I can see Apple becoming something on the level of Microsoft, maybe a little larger, but significantly behind the likes of Google and Meta,” he says. That would mean ad revenue in the tens rather than hundreds of billions. Microsoft says its ad revenue is about $10 billion a year; Google, the world’s top digital ads platform, made nearly $210 billion last year, with Meta in second place with $115 billion. Newman says that while Apple’s devices and services provide plenty of potential ad inventory, they don’t provide the scale or lucrative opportunities of Google’s search engine, Meta’s billions of social app users, or Amazon’s everything store. Though if persistent rumors Apple is building its own alternative to Google search prove true, the project could open lucrative new ad opportunities. And the company’s privacy pledges could limit how far it can go with ad targeting. Investment bank Evercore ISI estimates Apple will have a $30 billion ad business by 2026. That’s about the size of iPad sales in 2021, or a bit under half the company’s services revenue. Apple is hiring lots of people in pursuit of advertising riches. A job ad for an ad tech engineering manager cites the company’s “complex and ever-growing platform needs that help deliver highly optimized advertising content to consumers.” As of September, Apple had around 250 employees working on its ad platforms, according to an analysis of LinkedIn data by the Financial Times, with job listings suggesting plans to nearly double that number. Apple seems sensitive to how being seen to meddle too much in digital ads could tarnish its brand or attract regulatory pressure. It paid for a study, published in April, by a Columbia Business School professor that threw cold water on the idea that ATT helped it compete with the internet’s ad giants. But Reinhold Kesler, a researcher at the University of Zurich in Switzerland, has found that ATT has helped Apple. The feature led some app developers to shift business models from being free but with ads to paid models, sometimes including in-app payments. That was to the benefit of Apple, which takes a 30 percent cut of such payments, though it’s understood that some companies have negotiated better rates. Cusumano of MIT says Apple’s greatest challenge may be balancing its previous reputation for privacy against the data grab that digital ad businesses create. “Apple is a carefully manicured walled garden, not this advertisement-intense ecosystem like Google,” he says. Preserving that distinction while also growing ad revenue could be tricky. “Apple users are very loyal and forgiving,” says Kesler. “But if they push this to match their forecasts, I’ll be wondering whether users can overlook it.” Apple Is an Ad Company Now (May require free registration to view)
  11. Updates add new features, drop support for several generations of older hardware. The next versions of macOS and iPadOS will be released to the general public on October 24, Apple announced today. Both updates have been available as betas to developers and users since this summer, and a near-final version of each OS should be released to those testers sometime soon. The iPadOS 16 update runs on all iPad Pros, the 5th-generation iPad and later, the fifth-generation iPad mini and later, and the 3rd-generation iPad Air and later, dropping support for the venerable iPad Air 2 and a handful of other models (it will also ship on all the new iPads Apple announced today). The macOS Ventura update generally requires a Mac released in 2017 or later, dropping support for various models released between 2013 and 2016. Both updates will enable some iOS 16 features on iPads and Macs, including editing and deletion of iMessages, better search in Mail, passkey support in Safari, and a new large-screened Weather app and redesigned Home app, improved gamepad support, and more. Both also include a version of the Stage Manager window management feature, and Ventura includes a redesigned System Settings app. The macOS update has had a fairly typical development cycle, with nearly a dozen steadily improving beta builds released between early June and early October. The iPadOS update has been a little rougher, almost exclusively because of the new Stage Manager multitasking features. The iPadOS 16 release was officially delayed from September to October, which is why it’s being released next week instead of alongside iOS 16 last month. Stage Manager initially required an M1 iPad Air or Pro and true external display support, something the iPad has never had since its 2010 launch. In late September, Apple expanded Stage Manager compatibility to 2018 and 2020 iPad Pro models with the A12X and A12Z processors but delayed multi-monitor support to a later update. Some developers and Apple media personalities have indicated that Stage Manager in recent betas is still buggy and crash-prone. Apple will release macOS Ventura and iPadOS 16 on October 24
  12. iPhones sold without chargers is an "abusive practice," São Paulo judge says. Apple has received its third fine in Brazil for not including chargers with its iPhones. A civil court judge in São Paulo issued the tech giant a 100 million real (about $19 million) fine on Thursday, French news agency Agence France-Presse reported via Barron's. Civil court Judge Caramuru Afonso Francisco in São Paulo reportedly issued the fine as damages in a lawsuit from the Brazilian Consumers' Association. The judge is also said to have ordered Apple to start selling chargers with the iPhone 12 and iPhone 13 series in Brazil. Further, the judge ordered Apple to provide chargers to customers in Brazil who bought an iPhone 12 or 13 over the last two years. Apple can appeal the ruling and will, according to Reuters' report Thursday. Apple didn't immediately respond to Ars Technica's request for comment. The ruling dubbed Apple's charger-less iPhones an "abusive practice," AFP said. Apple stopped including chargers with its phones starting with the iPhone 12. At the time, Apple said that removing power adapters and EarPods from iPhone boxes meant smaller, lighter boxes, which enabled "70 percent more boxes to be shipped on a pallet" and "cut over 2 million metric tons of carbon emissions annually." In its 2020 iPhone 12 Product Environmental Report [PDF], Apple said it expected to avoid mining over 600,000 metric tons of copper, tin ore, and zinc by not including chargers and EarPods with the iPhone 12. In this week's ruling, however, Judge Francisco reportedly wrote that selling an iPhone without a charger "requires consumers to purchase a second product in order for the first to work." This marks Apple's third fine with the country since March 2021, when it reportedly received a fine worth $2 million from Procon-SP, São Paulo's consumer protection agency, for selling the iPhone in Brazil without a charger. And in September of this year, the Ministry of Justice and Public Security (MJSP) of Brazil fined Apple approximately $2.3 million and banned the selling of iPhones without chargers in the country. Similarly to Judge Francisco, the government body argued that Apple had shifted the burden to customers. Brazil's MJSP also disputed Apple's claims that it was being more eco-friendly, saying Apple could better help the environment by moving iPhones to USB-C. Brazil is considering mandating USB-C charging on phones. Even more pressure comes from the European Union moving forward with plans to require USB-C charging on various consumer electronics requiring wired charging, including phones, tablets, and headphones, by the end of next year. The issue seems like it will continue to be hard to ignore, as some US politicians have also pushed for universal charging. Earlier this year, a Bloomberg report claimed Apple is working on a USB-C iPhone for next year, but there has been no official word from Apple. Brazil court orders Apple to reimburse customers for charger-less iPhones
  13. India officially launched 5G services on October 1, almost a month after Apple's newest iPhone 14 models went official. Despite being 5G capable, iPhone devices can not run 5G in India while they are on Airtel and Jio networks. Worse, iPhone users in India will have to wait a few more months for Apple to release 5G software updates to fix this. How many are a few months, you ask? Well, in a statement to Economic Times, an Apple representative said that it was eyeing December to release the 5G software updates for iPhone devices in India. The company did not disclose the exact date, but it should be rolled out to everyone by the end of December 2022 or early January 2023. The full statement given to ET reads as follows: We are working with our carrier partners in India to bring the best 5G experience to iPhone users as soon as network validation and testing for quality and performance is completed. 5G will be enabled via a software update and will start rolling out to iPhone users in December. If you own models older than iPhone 12, you will not benefit from 5G networks. Since those models are not 5G supported, no 5G-related software updates will be rolled out to them in December. Apple is not the only company that has to roll out a software update to enable 5G in its handsets. Companies like Samsung will have to do the same to bring 5G to their users in India. However, not all Android devices require an update. All the latest flagship devices, unlike iPhone handsets, from major brands launched this year do not need additional updates to run 5G. If you are based in Indian cities where 5G is currently available, have you tested 5G networks yet? Share your experience with us in the comments. Source: Economic Times Apple reveals when it will roll out 5G software updates for iPhone models in India
  14. A week ago, a third-party Instagram client landed on the Apple App Store and Google Play Store after generating hype for about a year. Dubbed "The OG App" and developed by a startup called "Un1feed", it offered an ad-free experience for Instagram users complete with a customizable feed without Reels and touting other privacy benefits. However, it has now been pulled from Apple's storefront following complaints by Meta. In a statement to TechCrunch, a Meta spokesperson noted that the app violated its policies and that it is taking all "appropriate enforcement actions". Apple removed The OG app from its App Store too, but it's currently unclear if this is due to an explicit demand made by Meta. Un1feed expressed disappointment at the move and accused Apple of colluding with Meta. It stated that: Everyone knows Instagram sucks. We made it better and got a lot of love from users. But Facebook hates its own users so much, it’s willing to crush an alternative that gives them a clean, ad-free Instagram. Apple is colluding with Facebook to bully two teenagers who made Instagram better. The app's official Twitter account echoed the same thoughts but some social media users were quick to point out that the app is still in clear violation of Instagram's Terms of Use: Indeed, the app wasn't consuming from Instagram's vanilla public API. The startup had already stated that it had accomplished the ad-free and customizable experience by "reverse-engineering" Instagram's Android API. Un1feed had initially stated that it will continue its efforts to get the app relisted but this seems very difficult now considering that Meta has disabled access to Facebook and Instagram for all members of the startup. The app continues to be available on the Google Play Store, but it's unlikely that this will remain the case for long. Apple removes ad-free Instagram client from App Store following complaints from Meta
  15. The Safari 16 update is now available for macOS Monterey and Big Sur users. Let's take a look at the new version of the web browser. What's new in Apple Safari 16 for macOS I mentioned a few features that were introduced in Safari 16, when the first Technology Preview of the browser was released. Apple states that it has improved the performance of the browser, this includes tweaks to various animations, accessibility options, security, etc in WebKit. It also adds support for Web Inspector extensions. Tab Groups Start Pages Safari 16 lets you add Tab Group Start Pages, aka new tab pages, per group. To add shortcuts, click the new tab button. Drag and drop some websites from your bookmarks to the Tab Group Favorites section. This serves as your Tab Group's Start Page. You can hide the shortcuts by clicking the button in the bottom right corner and disabling the option that says "Tab Group Favorites". There is another way to access your frequently visited websites. Right-click on a tab in a Tab Group, and pin it to prevent it from being closed. Safari 16 supports 2 view modes for Tab Groups: a list view, and an overview. To view a list of your tabs, right-click on the Tab Group's name in the sidebar, and select "Show Tabs in Sidebar". The list can be collapsed in similar fashion by clicking "Hide Tabs in Sidebar". The Show Tab Overview option in the sidebar's context menu switches to a thumbnail view. You can also toggle this mode by clicking the dual pane button in the top right corner of Safari's window. You can customize the appearance of the current Tab Group from the bottom-right menu in the Start Page. Select the background image option, and pick an image that you would like to use as the wallpaper. You may set a different background images for each Tab Group. As for UI Changes, some shortcuts in the sidebar have been moved to the bottom, this includes Bookmarks, Reading List, Shared with You, and iCloud Tabs. The Safari 16 update fixes 4 security issues in the browser, you can read about them on Apple's support portal. Settings sync across devices Safari 16 will sync the settings that you have set for websites across your other devices. e.g. if you blocked notifications, location access, etc. So you don't have to choose the options every time you access the website on one of your Apple devices. Password Editing The password manager in Safari 16 now supports the editing of strong passwords in order to comply with a website's requirements. When you sign up for an account on a website and click the Passwords button, Safari will generate a password for you. Click the words "Strong Password" to bring up the Passwords panel into view. Select the "Other Options" button, and click the "Edit Strong Password" option to customize the password. AVIF format Safari 16 on iOS introduces support for the AVIF format for still images. It is an alternative to PNG, JPEG, GIF, WebP and supports lossless and lossy compression, multiple color spaces, etc. AVIF support and Passkeys are not yet available in Safari 16 for Mac and iPad, Apple says that it will add these features to the browser when macOS Ventura and iPadOS are released in October. Open the Apple menu on your Mac, and head to About this Mac > and check for Software Update to install Safari 16 on your machine. The latest version is available alongside the macOS 12.6 update that was released yesterday. Apple releases Safari 16 for macOS Monterey and Big Sur
  16. Apple released the next major iterations of multiple operating systems for its devices. However, among the latest versions, the company has also sent out some small incremental updates for previous versions of iOS and macOS. Apple has begun seeding watchOS 9, tvOS 16, and iOS 16. Around the world, Apple Watch, Apple TV, and iPhone devices should start receiving these updates. However, Apple has also released several smaller updates for older operating systems, including iOS 15.7, iPadOS 15.7, and macOS Monterey 12.6. The iPadOS and macOS updates include security-related patches from the newer OS versions. Incidentally, unlike the iPhone and Macs, iPads haven’t received a major update along with the other devices. Compatible Apple iPad devices will receive iPadOS 16, and Macs will get the macOS Ventura later this year. Apple clearly did not want these devices to remain exposed to the security vulnerabilities, which are patched in the new versions of the OS but aren’t yet fully ready for deployment. The iOS 15.7 update, on the other hand, ensures the older iPhones that can't run iOS 16, are updated with security patches. Specifically speaking, the iPhone 6S and iPhone 7 series, along with the original iPhone SE, among others will be patched, but won’t receive the iOS 16 update. Additionally, these incremental updates for iOS 15 give people who don't want to upgrade to iOS 16, a way to get security updates. Apple adopted a similar approach when it released iOS 15. The company had sent out iOS 14.8 to supported devices. This allowed people to defer the iOS 15 update without risking their devices and data. It is quite possible that Apple could push all iOS users to update to iOS 16 in the next few months. Source: Apple via: Ars Technica Apple sends out iOS 15.7, macOS 12.6 security updates with patches already in iOS 16
  17. The latest iPhone update is now available for download, complete with a revamped lock screen, editable Messages, and more. the time has come to update your iPhone. Apple has officially released the final version of iOS 16, which builds on many of the new features introduced in iOS 15, like SharePlay and Focus, and adds greater customization. Below we dive into all the major capabilities now available on your iPhone and how to download the new operating system. We've included details on iPadOS 16, too, but the update for iPads won't be available until October. Be sure to read our MacOS Ventura feature roundup for all the new features available for Macs—which will also be released next month. Updated September 12: We've added details on how to download iOS 16. Is Your iPhone or iPad Compatible? With iOS 16, Apple is ending software support for the following devices: the iPhone 6S, iPhone 6S Plus, iPhone SE 2016, iPhone 7, and iPhone 7 Plus. Basically, if you have an iPhone 8 (2017) or newer (including the second- and third-gen iPhone SE), you can download and run iOS 16. That doesn't mean every feature in the update will be available on your iPhone, though, as some features like Live Text work only with iPhones powered by an A12 Bionic chip or newer. It's a little more complicated for iPads since they don't have sensible naming conventions. Here are the generations that will receive iPadOS 16. You can figure out which model you have by following the directions here. iPad: 5th-gen and up iPad Mini: 4th-gen and up iPad Air: 2nd-gen and up 9.7-inch and 10.5-inch iPad Pro 11-inch iPad Pro: First-gen and up 12.9-inch iPad Pro: First-gen and up How to Install iOS 16 Before downloading iOS 16, we highly recommend backing up your iPhone. It's easy if you do it via iCloud. Go to Settings, tap on your name at the top and then select iCloud. From there, tap on iCloud Backup and toggle it on. Then, tap Back Up Now to trigger a new backup. You also have the option on the previous iCloud page to toggle off specific apps that you don't want included in the backup. If you don't have enough iCloud storage or you just want another method, you can check out our How to Back Up Your iPhone guide for alternative options. Once that's done, you're ready to install iOS 16. Since this is a hefty update, you should plug your iPhone or iPad into a charger. Then, make sure your devices are connected to Wi-Fi. Next, head to Settings > General > Software Update. You should see an option to download the update. Tap on Download and Install. When the download is complete, you'll need to tap Install Now for the iPhone to begin updating. When your device restarts, the update is complete. The whole process can take some time, so run the update when you won't need to use your iPhone. What’s New in iOS 16? Here, we've highlighted the top new features currently available in iOS 16. We'll be adding more continuously as Apple releases updates for the OS. Lock Screen Overhaul New lock screens. Photograph: Apple Apple redesigned the lock screen completely in iOS 16. Notifications now appear on the bottom of the screen so as to not clutter up your beautiful lock screen photo. The clock widget cuts behind the subject of your photo, giving off a cool depth effect, and you can customize its design, from the typeface to the color—just press and hold the lock screen to go into editing mode. You can add more widgets below the clock, like weather, activity rings, and the calendar. All the way at the bottom, where the notifications live, you can also pin certain kinds of live activities. For example, if you're following an NBA game, you can see the scores via a pinned notification at the bottom. You can also pin things like Uber rides, workout activities, and Now Playing controls, which can expand to the full lock screen to show album art. There's a new wallpaper gallery with tons of designs to choose from, including a live weather lock screen that mimics the real-time weather conditions, or suggestions using photos from your very own camera roll. Apple lets you set up multiple lock screens, and it's easy to cycle through them, just like how you can easily switch watch faces with a swipe on an Apple Watch. More Focus Improvements More customization in Focus. Photograph: Apple Your lock screen can also be tied to a Focus, meaning you can set a lock screen for your Work Focus and a different one—with a more personal photograph—for your Personal Focus. Swiping to the relevant lock screen will simply trigger that Focus. iOS 16 also adds Focus Filters in apps like Safari, Calendar, Mail, and Messages. This means when you open Safari with your Work Focus turned on, you'll only see work-related tabs. The same goes for the other apps that support these filters, and Apple says developers can take advantage of an API to add support. Messages, but Editable Poof. Video: Apple Twitter is finally coming around to letting you edit tweets and Apple is getting onboard too. You can edit messages in the Messages app after you've sent them, though you only have a 15-minute window and you can edit them up to five times. You can even “undo send” to recall messages, though this feature expires after two minutes. (The thread indicates when a message was edited or deleted.) Also new is the ability to mark any thread as unread so you can check back on messages at a later time. Apple also added SharePlay support to the Messages app. Now, you don't need to FaceTime a friend just to watch a synced movie together—you can start the action in the Messages app and chat with synced video and shared playback controls. Frequently chatting with Android users? You'll be happy to learn that Apple has gotten rid of reaction texts. Google got rid of this in a recent update on the Android side, and now you won't get bombarded every time your friends like another message. If you're a fan of dictating your messages instead of typing (fewer “ducks,” am I right?) then you'll appreciate the improvements to dictation. Now, the keyboard will stay open during dictation so you can easily move between voice and touch. You can tap text to select it and replace it with your voice, and even send emojis without taking forever to find one. Safari Tab Groups and Passkeys You can create tab groups in Safari already, such as a collection of tabs for work, but in iOS 16 you can share these groups with other people. You'll also be able to see what tabs people are viewing in real-time. Everyone wants to get rid of passwords, and Apple is one step closer with Passkeys. These are unique digital keys you can create via Touch ID or Face ID; there's no password to generate or type in, and Apple says they are virtually immune from being phished or leaked in a data breach. They sync across your Apple devices via iCloud Keychain and will work across apps and the web. Apple says it's working with the FIDO Alliance for a cross-platform solution for those who also use non-Apple devices. Read more about how Passkeys work. Updates to Live Text Visual Look Up Real-time visual translation. Photograph: Apple Live Text, the feature that lets you grab the text in any photo (before or after you snap it), now works with videos. Just pause on any video and tap the text to copy it. There are a few new quick actions when you select particular kinds of text, such as converting currency and translating text. Visual Look Up is a different feature Apple introduced last year that offered up more information on the photo you were looking at, such as details about a landmark or similar web results. It now supports birds, insects, and statues, but you can also use it to grab the subject from a photo (much like using the Lasso tool in PhotoShop) to paste anywhere, like in a conversation thread in Messages. Medication Tracking Apple updated the Health app with a new Medication tab to help make it easier to track your medications. You can use it to add medications you need to take and set reminders (and receive them on the Apple Watch). You can manually type in these medications or just scan the label of the bottle with your phone's camera. The data includes Critical, Serious, or Moderate interactions with the pills. You're able to log when you've taken your medications, too. You can share this health data with family members. Use Your iPhone as a Webcam Photograph: Olivia Bee/Apple You can use your iPhone as a MacBook webcam (the rear cameras, which are significantly better than the webcam cameras), and without needing to plug anything in—your Mac will automatically detect the rear camera and use it for your video calls. (Any MacBook that can run MacOS Ventura will support this feature.) You'll be able to use features like Center Stage, which has the camera following you around a room, and Portrait Mode, which blurs the background to block out the mess behind you. There's even a Desk View mode that utilizes the ultrawide camera to show folks what's on your desk, though I don't want anyone seeing that. Apple says it's working with Belkin on custom mounts to outfit your iPhone on top of the MacBook. Apple Maps Goes to Vegas Apple has been slowly redesigning select cities in the US to show off richer data. The company has added Las Vegas, Nevada, to the list, along with six more cities coming by the end of the year. Other Maps updates include the ability to add up to 15 stops before your final destination, which is great for long-distance road trips (and you can set this up on a Mac and send it straight to your iPhone). If you're using public transit, you can now see fares, add transit cards, see low balances, and reload transit cards. Lockdown Mode Photograph: Apple In an effort to help protect your devices from “highly sophisticated cyberattacks,” Lockdown mode adds an extreme layer of additional protection to your iPhone and iPad. When enabled, features, apps, and websites will be limited for security purposes to help keep the malware or spyware from accessing and compromising specific data. You can learn more about Lockdown Mode and how to turn it on here. Safety Check This new tool lets you quickly remove all access that you might have granted to anyone in your circles, and includes an emergency reset that will sign you out of iCloud on all other devices, reset privacy permissions, and limit messaging to the device you have in your hand. It also shows you who has access to your devices and apps. Family Sharing Photograph: Apple There's now a simpler process for setting up devices for kids. Just bring your iPhone close to your iPad and choose your kids' account. It'll set it up with all the parental controls you configured before. You can even grant screen time extensions in the Messages app instead of having to go into the device's settings. There's also a Family Checklist tool for suggestions like turning on location sharing, tweaking settings as your kids get older, and more. Other New Features There are tons of other iOS 16 features. Here are a few more worth calling out: Mail: You can now schedule emails, unsend emails (within a short period of time), get reminders to add an attachment if you mention the word, snooze emails, and get follow-up suggestions. Apple says it has overhauled the search function, too, so you should have an easier time finding old emails. Home: The Home app has been redesigned from the ground up. It'll support the upcoming Matter standard, and you can now see your entire home in a single feed. Handoff FaceTime Calls: When you're FaceTiming on your phone, bring the device close to your MacBook or iPad and the call will transfer to your large-screen device. This works with any MacBook that can run MacOS Ventura. Fitness: Yes, that's right. The Fitness app is finally available to anyone with an iPhone. No Apple Watch needed. You'll be able to close your rings without needing to wear your Apple Watch. There are also a bunch of new WatchOS features made for tracking runs. Apple News: A new My Sports section lets you follow your favorite teams and players in one area of the News app. You can see scores, schedules, standings, and highlights. It's available in the US, UK, Canada, and Australia, and you'll get premium coverage if you subscribe to Apple News+. CarPlay: Apple is working with carmakers on a redesigned CarPlay experience. That includes a customizable odometer, buttons to control every facet of the car, and a unified interface. The first cars to launch with this new experience will be announced late in 2023. Accessibility: A few top accessibility features include Door Detection, which lets people who are blind or have low vision use iPhones to see the area in front of them. Apple Watch Mirroring allows anyone with physical and motor disabilities to fully control the Apple Watch from the iPhone. Quick Notes: This iPad feature is now available on iPhones. You can create a note anywhere by accessing it from the Control Center. Nintendo Controller Support: iOS 16 adds support for the Nintendo Switch Pro Controller and Joy-Cons, so you can play games with them. iOS already supports PS5 and Xbox Series X controllers. Coming Soon All of the aforementioned features are currently accessible in iOS 16, but there are a couple that will be released with future updates. Apple hasn't given us an exact date on when to expect them aside from later this year or in a future update. Pay It Later With Apple Pay You can afford it. Really. Photograph: Apple Services that let you buy now but pay later have received some pushback from consumer analysts, but Apple is barreling ahead with its own take called Apple Pay Later. In a future update, you'll be able to split the cost of an Apple Pay purchase over four equal payments spread over six weeks with zero interest and no fees. You'll also have the option to apply for Apple Pay Later when you're checking out with Apple Pay (Apple says it will do a soft credit check), and you'll need to have it backed with a debit card. Apple says it's available everywhere Apple Pay is accepted online or in-app. You can also see order tracking directly in Apple Pay, though this is available only with participating merchants. And if you're a small business owner, you'll be able to accept Apple Pay payments via iPhone instead of having to use a separate terminal. Over in Apple Wallet, you can already add your digital driver's license if you're in Maryland or Arizona, and Apple says support for 11 other states is on the way. You're able to use this ID for apps that require identification, and Apple says it only shows necessary information, such as the fact that you're over 21, instead of your full birth date. You can also simply share your home, hotel, office, and car keys through messaging apps like Messages, WhatsApp, and Mail. Apple says it's working on a standard to support sharing these keys with folks that don't have an iPhone. Freeform Apple is currently working on debuting an app called Freeform. Think of it as a virtual whiteboard. You can start a FaceTime and hop into Freeform to collaborate with or without an Apple Pencil. It'll be available on iOS, iPadOS, and MacOS. iCloud Shared Photo Library Photograph: Apple You'll soon be able to set up an iCloud Shared Photo Library, similar to how you can set up shared photo libraries in Google Photos. Just add up to five other people to a library and everyone can add and edit family photos. You can choose which photos to share, including whether to base them on a start date or via face detection. There's also a toggle in the Camera app that you can turn on to automatically send the photo you capture to the shared library. If you're all on vacation, these photos can even automatically show up in the shared library based on your proximity to family members. iPadOS 16 iPadOS shares a lot of DNA with iOS, so many of the iOS 16 features mentioned above will apply to iPadOS 16, too. Here are a few more tablet-specific features coming next month. Easier Collaboration Photograph: Apple Sharing projects can be a pain, what with adding email addresses and granting access. In iPadOS 16 (and iOS 16 and MacOS Ventura), you can use the Share button in Files, Keynote, Numbers, Pages, Notes, Reminders, and Safari, and just share access via Messages to the relevant thread. Everyone will immediately get access, and will be able to see updates and quickly start FaceTime calls with folks who are in a collaborative project. The Weather App Arrives Photograph: Apple No, it's not 2010. The iPad is finally getting a default weather app. Need I say more? Next, maybe Apple will finally bring the calculator app to the tablet. Desktop-Like Multitasking Photograph: Apple The iPad is continuing to behave even more like a desktop computer. With Stage Manager, you can see apps and windows on the left side of the screen and switch through them with just a tap. Your apps will appear as floating windows, and you can resize them and have them overlap, much like on MacOS. Unfortunately, Stage Manager only works on M1-powered iPads, which is a small subset of slates. Reference Mode Apple's 12.9-inch iPad Pro (from 2021) has a Mini LED screen that can be utilized as a reference monitor. Basically, creators need color-accurate screens, and a new Reference Mode will let professionals use this iPad screen to ensure consistent image quality. The Top New Features in Apple’s iOS and iPadOS 16 (May require free registration to view)
  18. iOS 16, announced in June 2022 on WWDC22, is now available for download. Apple has started rolling out its latest major update with various new features, fixes, and security enhancements. In addition to iOS 16, Apple is rolling out watchOS 9 for compatible Apple Watch models (Series 4 and newer). What iPhones support iOS 16? You can download iOS 16 on the following iPhone models: iPhone 8 and 8 Plus iPhone X iPhone XS and XS Max iPhone XR iPhone 11 iPhone 11 Pro and 11 Pro Max iPhone SE (2nd generation, 2020 model) iPhone 12 and 12 mini iPhone 12 and 12 Pro iPhone 13 and 13 mini iPhone 13 Pro and 13 Pro Max iPhone SE (3rd generation, 2022 model) This year, Apple has left behind several old iPhone models: the original iPhone SE, iPhone 6S, 6S Plus, and iPhone 7, alongside its plus-sized variant. What is new in iOS 16? Here are some of the biggest changes in iOS 16: Redesigned lock screen: users can now personalize fonts, add widgets, and create multiple lock screen designs. iOS 16 lets you link a specific lock screen to a focus profile, so the look and feel of our iPhone match what you do. Redesigned notifications and Live Activities: notifications now appear at the bottom of the screen for better accessibility. Also, Live Activities let you get updates and "stay on top of things" without leaving the lock screen. Editable and delectable iMessage: similar to popular messengers, iMessage now lets you edit or delete a sent message, plus mark messages as unread. Other iOS 16 improvements for iMessage include SharePlay via Messages and improved collaboration. Passkeys: a new sign-in method "that is end-to-end encrypted and safe from phishing and data leaks." Mail improvements: the built-in Mail client lets you undo send, schedule an email, and add rich links. Smarter Dictation: it is now easier to move from voice input to the keyboard, plus Smart Dictation can automatically add commas, periods, question marks, and even emojis. Intelligent features: iOS 16 can "lift" a subject from an image and remove the background, and the Live Text feature now works in videos, allowing you to copy text from any video. Health improvements: the built-in Health app lets you track medication intake or share medical information with your loved ones or caregivers. Also, the Fitness app is now available for all iPhone users without requiring an Apple Watch. Wallet and Apple Pay: Apple Pay customers can use the service to split the cost of purchases into four payments over six weeks and then track receipts and orders directly in Wallet. Many more. How to download and install iOS 16? Launch the Settings app on your iPhone. Go to General > Software Update. Wait for your iPhone to detect the update, then tap iOS 16 at the bottom of the screen. Note that you can stay on iOS 15 and continue receiving updates for it, even if your iPhone supports a newer release. Proceed with on-screen instructions. What about iPadOS 16? Apple is not ready to ship iPadOS 16 today, but it says the latest iPadOS release will be available in October 2022. Apple could reveal the exact release day alongside new iPads rumored to arrive later this year. Are you installing iOS 16 today, or are you waiting for Apple to release a few more fixes? Share your thoughts in the comments. Apple starts rolling out iOS 16 with redesigned lock screen, iMessage improvements, more
  19. Apple's watchOS 9, announced in June on WWDC22, is now available for download on supported Apple Watch models. To get watchOS 9 on your Apple Watch, you need an iPhone with iOS 16, which is also rolling out now. What Apple Watch models support watchOS 9? watchOS 9 is available on the following Apple Watch models: Apple Watch Series 4 Apple Watch Series 5 Apple Watch Series 6 Apple Watch SE (first-gen, 2020 model) Apple Watch Series 7 This year, Apple has finally ditched the outdated Series 3, the only Apple device with a 32-bit processor. The company no longer sells the Series 3, offering the new SE variant as the most affordable Apple Watch. What is new in watchOS 9? Here are the most notable changes in watchOS 9: Improved Workout Views: your Apple Watch can show more information when you work out. Turning the Digital Crown reveals new views of additional metrics, such as activity rings, heart rate zones, elevation, etc. Users can also create custom heart rate zones and set work and recovery intervals to suit their training. There are automatic transitions between swim, bike, and run for triathletes swimming enhancements. Medication tracking: you can track medication intake using your Apple Watch. The device will send you a notification with the option to log medication, vitamins, and supplements. Reworked Sleep Tracking now shows sleep stages and awake periods, plus there are comparison charts with heart and respiratory rate metrics. New Watch Faces: no major watchOS release without new watch faces. Apple has generously provided three new faces this year: Metropolitan, Joi Fulton, and Astronomy (remastered). Besides, some older faces received support for rich complications and colorful backgrounds. AFib History: users diagnosed with atrial fibrillation can track their AFib history and see how different factors influence their heart condition. Accessibility improvements: the Apple Watch now lets you double-pinch your fingers to start a workout or take a photo, plus you can operate the Watch from your iPhone. Redesigned notifications: notifications on the Apple Watch no longer take over the entire screen. Instead, they appear as unobtrusive banners when the Watch is in use. Productivity improvements: you can create new calendar events directly from your Apple Watch and use the built-in keyboard (Series 7, Series 8, and Ultra) in seven new languages. More minor changes. How to download watchOS 9? If you own a compatible Apple Watch, update your iPhone to iOS 16 first, then launch the Watch app and navigate to General > Software Update. Are you updating your Apple Watch today? What new feature or changes excites you the most? Share your thoughts in the comments. Apple starts rolling out watchOS 9 with improved sleep and workout tracking
  20. Karlston

    iOS 16 launches September 12

    New iPhone software will bring lock screen changes, passkeys, and app updates. CUPERTINO, Calif.—iOS 16, the next major annual software update for the iPhone, arrives for supported devices on September 12, Apple announced today. The update didn't get a release date during Apple's big keynote, but shortly afterward, the iOS 16 website was updated with release information. The iPhone 8 and newer devices will be supported. The biggest change in iOS 16 is arguably a total overhaul of the lock screen, which is now much more customizable than it was in iOS 15 and before. Users will be able to add animated wallpapers and custom interactive widgets to several swappable, custom lock screens. Lock screens will also be able to change based on the current Focus mode on the iPhone, building on another recent iOS feature. The list of supported devices. Apple Further, the lock screen will get a new feature called Live Activities, which will let you see updates on currently unfolding events like sports games or the news without swiping past the lock screen to interact with apps or widgets. Apart from the lock screen improvements, most of the major additions in iOS 16 are in individual built-in apps like Messages and Mail. For example, Messages will now allow you to edit or delete a sent text message—but the recipient will still see that a message was edited or deleted, even if they can't see what it was. In Mail, you'll be able to schedule emails to be sent and set follow-up reminders. For the past few years, iPadOS has launched in close timing with its companion iOS update, but Apple already said before this event that won't be the case this year. Expect iPadOS 16 several weeks later, possibly timed with new iPad hardware in October. iOS 16 launches September 12
  21. All the news from Apple’s Far Out event Apple just held its Far Out event, where it revealed its iPhone 14 lineup, three new Apple Watches, including the long-rumored Apple Watch Ultra, and the next generation of AirPods Pro earbuds. If you didn’t get a chance to see the show for yourself, you can catch up on all the big news announced here. The iPhone 14 gets a revived “Plus” model with a bigger size The iPhone 14 and 14 Plus Image: Apple The iPhone 14 doesn’t come with too many notable upgrades over the iPhone 13, as they both come equipped with the an A15-series chip and a notch. Apple did, however, introduce a new Plus model that comes with a bigger 6.7-inch display and improved battery life. Both devices come with an upgraded 12-megapixel main camera sensor, as well as a 12-megapixel TrueDepth selfie camera with autofocus. The iPhone 14 starts $799 and the iPhone 14 Plus starts at $899. You can preorder them on September 9th, with the iPhone 14 to become available starting September 16th and the Plus becoming available on October 7th. The iPhone 14 Pro has a notchless design with a “dynamic island” The iPhone 14 Pro and Pro Max Image: Apple The iPhone 14 Pro and Pro Max come with a few big upgrades, including a design that swaps out the notch for a pill-shaped cutout that houses the camera and under-display FaceID system. Apple calls this the “dynamic island,” as notifications will pop out and move around this space. Additionally, the Pro line has a more powerful A16 chip, a brighter display, better battery life, and a 48-megapixel rear camera with a quad-pixel sensor. Apple’s bringing always-on displays to the iPhone Pro and Pro Max as well, which dim your lockscreen’s wallpaper when enabled to continue showing notifications without eating up too much battery. The iPhone 14 Pro and Pro Max will cost $999 and $1,099, respectively. You can preorder them starting on September 9th, with both devices becoming available on September 16th. Apple goes all-in on eSIM Image: Apple Apple announced that it won’t include physical SIM trays with iPhone 14 models sold in the US. The iPhone 14 will use an eSIM instead, also known as a digital SIM card. Apple says eSIMs are more secure and should help users easily switch between carriers — but it could be trickier for anyone used to the simplicity of popping their SIM card out and switching it to another phone to change service. The iPhone 14 can send emergency messages over satellite The iPhone 14’s new emergency SOS feature. Image: Apple Apple is adding satellite connectivity to the new iPhone 14 and 14 Pro for emergency situations in the US and Canada. If you’re in need of help and have no service, Apple says you should be able to point your phone to the nearest satellite to send an SOS message to a nearby emergency service, as long as the sky is clear. The feature will be included for free on new phones for two years. Apple introduces the new Apple Watch Ultra for extreme sports The Apple Watch Ultra Image: Apple Apple’s brand new Watch Ultra offers a more rugged design for extreme sports athletes. It has a larger 49mm titanium case designed to protect it from wear and tear, along with a new customizable action button to transition between sports. The new Oceanic Plus App also gives Ultra users the ability to track their underwater dives. The Apple Watch Ultra provides up to 36 hours of battery life on just one charge, with Apple set to introduce a battery optimization feature later this year that will give the Ultra an extended 60-hour battery life. The Watch Ultra will be available for preorder today for $799, with shipments starting September 23rd. The Watch Series 8 comes with new temperature sensors The Apple Watch Series 8 Image: Apple Apple’s next-gen Watch Series 8 has two new temperature sensors — one on the back and one beneath the display — designed to help with fertility tracking. The watch checks your temperature every five seconds, and Apple says it can detect temperature changes as minor as 0.1 degrees Celsius. There’s also a new crash-detecting feature that senses if you’ve been in a car crash and gives you the option to call for help. Apple announced a low-power mode as well, which disables certain features, like always-on display, to help conserve battery. The Watch Series 8 starts at $399 for GPS and $499 for cellular. Preorders open today, and it’ll be available starting September 16th. The Apple Watch SE is back The Apple Watch SE Image: Apple Apple has introduced the next-generation Apple Watch SE. It comes with an upgraded S8 chip that makes it 20 percent faster than the 2020 model, and also has some of the same capabilities as the Watch Series 8, including crash detection. You can preorder it today for $249 with GPS or $299 with cellular before it becomes available on September 16th. The second-generation AirPods Pro are here with better noise cancellation The new Apple AirPods Pro Image: Apple Apple has announced an upgraded AirPods Pro, which Apple CEO Tim Cook called its “most advanced” so far. They come with a new H2 chip, spatial audio, and have twice the noise canceling capabilities as the previous model. In addition to an increased 6 hours of listening time on a single charge (or 30 hours with the charging case), there are also speakers installed on each earbud and the charging case, so you can locate them using the Find My app. You can preorder the AirPods Pro for $249 on September 9th, with availability starting September 23rd. iOS 16 and watchOS 9 are coming on September 12th iOS 16 and watchOS 9 will roll out starting September 12th. The iOS 16 update enables new features for the lockscreen, including widgets and notifications that roll up from the bottom of the screen, while watchOS 9 adds a bundle of new fitness tracking metrics. Apple’s iPhone 14 event: the 9 biggest announcements
  22. With iOS 16 and macOS Ventura, Apple is introducing passkeys—a more convenient and secure alternative to passwords. For years, we’ve been promised the end of password-based logins. Now the reality of a passwordless future is taking a big leap forward, with the ability to ditch passwords being rolled out for millions of people. When Apple launches iOS 16 on September 12 and macOS Ventura sometime soon, the software will include its password replacement, known as passkeys, for iPhones, iPads, and Macs. Passkeys allow you to log in to apps and websites, or create new accounts, without having to create, memorize, or store a password. This passkey, which is made up of a cryptographic key pair, replaces your traditional password and is synced across iCloud’s Keychain. It has the potential to eliminate passwords and improve your online security, replacing the insecure passwords and bad habits you probably have now. Apple’s rollout of passkeys is one of the largest implementations of password-free technology to date and builds on years of work by the FIDO Alliance, an industry group made up of tech’s biggest companies. Apple’s passkeys are its version of the standards created by the FIDO Alliance, meaning they will eventually work with Google, Microsoft, Meta, and Amazon’s systems. What Is a Passkey? Using a passkey is similar to using a password. On Apple’s devices, it’s built into the traditional password boxes that websites and apps use to get you to log in. Passkeys act as a unique digital key and can be created for each app or website you use. (The word “passkey” is also being used by Google and Microsoft, with FIDO calling them “multi-device FIDO credentials.”) If you are new to an app or a website, there’s the potential that you can create a passkey instead of a password from the start. But for services where you already have an account, it’s likely you will need to log in to that existing account using your password and then create a passkey. Apple’s demonstrations of the technology show a prompt appearing on your devices during the sign-in or account-creation phase. This box will ask whether you would like to “save a passkey” for the account you are using. At this stage, your device will prompt you to use Face ID, Touch ID, or another authentication method to create the passkey. Once created, the passkey can be stored in iCloud’s Keychain and synced across multiple devices—meaning your passkeys will be available on your iPad and MacBook without any extra work. Passkeys work in Apple’s Safari web browser as well as on its devices. They can also be shared with nearby Apple devices using AirDrop. As Apple’s passkeys are based on the wider passwordless standards created by the FIDO Alliance, there’s the potential that they can be stored elsewhere, too. For instance, password manager Dashlane has already announced its support for passkeys, claiming it is an “independent and universal solution agnostic of the device or platform.” While Apple is launching passkeys with iOS 16 and macOS Ventura, there are several caveats to its rollout. First, you need to update your devices to the new operating system. Second is that apps and websites need to support the use of passkeys—they can do this by using the FIDO standards. Ahead of Apple’s updates, it isn’t clear which apps or websites are already supporting passkeys, although Apple first previewed the technology to developers at its developer conference in 2021. How Do Apple’s Passkeys Work? Under the hood, Apple’s passkeys are based on the Web Authentication API (WebAuthn), which was developed by the FIDO Alliance and World Wide Web Consortium (WC3). The passkeys themselves use public key cryptography to protect your accounts. As a result, a passkey isn’t something that can (easily) be typed. When you create a passkey, a pair of related digital keys are created by your system. “These keys are generated by your devices, securely and uniquely, for every account,” Garrett Davidson, an engineer on Apple’s authentication experience team, said in a video about passkeys. One of these keys is public and stored on Apple’s servers, while the other key is a secret key and stays on your device at all times. “The server never learns what your private key is, and your devices keep it safe,” Davidson said. When you try to sign in to one of your accounts using a passkey, the website or app’s server sends your device a “challenge,” essentially asking your device to prove that it’s you logging in. The private key, which is stored on your device, is able to answer this challenge and send its response back. This answer is then validated by the public key, which then allows you to log in. “This means the server can be sure that you have the right private key, without knowing what the private key actually is,” Davidson said. What if I Don’t Use Only Apple Devices? Because Apple developed its passkeys based on the FIDO Alliance standards, the passkeys can work across devices and on the web. If you try to log in to one of your accounts on a Windows machine, you’ll have to use a slightly different method since your passkeys won’t be stored on that machine. (If they are saved in an external password manager, you would need to log in to that first). Instead, when you log in to a website in Google Chrome, for example, you will have to use a QR code and your iPhone to help you sign in. The QR code contains a URL that includes single-use encryption keys. Once scanned, your phone and the computer are able to communicate using an end-to-end encrypted network via Bluetooth and share information. “That means a QR code sent in an email or generated on a fake website won’t work, because a remote attacker won’t be able to receive the Bluetooth advertisement and complete the local exchange,” Davidson said. This process happens between your phone and the web browser—the website you are logging in to isn’t involved. Aside from Apple, other tech firms are in various stages of rolling out their own passkey technology. Google’s developer pages say it aims to have passkey support available for Android developers “towards the end of 2022.” Microsoft has been using some passwordless login systems for a few years now and says that “in the near future,” people will be able to sign in to a Microsoft account with a passkey from an Apple or Google device. Are Passkeys Better Than Passwords? No system is infallible, but the passwords people currently use are one of the biggest security problems with the web. Every year, the most popular passwords people use—according to analysis of data breaches—are topped by “123456789” and “password.” Using weak and repeated passwords is one of the most significant risks to your online life. There’s wide support for abandoning passwords—the FIDO Alliance involves pretty much every big technology company, and they’re all working on eliminating the password. Jen Easterly, the director of the US Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency, welcomed the adoption of passwordless technologies in May this year. “Every passkey is strong. They’re never guessable, reused, or weak,” Apple says in its documentation of passkeys. “To really address password problems, we need to move beyond passwords,” Google says in its own description of passkeys. It claims passkeys will help reduce phishing attacks—people can’t be tricked into sharing their passkeys—and that passkeys are less of a target for hackers as their details aren’t stored on servers. Despite the enthusiasm for passkeys, passwords are going to be around for a long time yet. Transitioning people from using passwords to a new sign-in method requires them to trust and understand the new system; apps and websites also need to support passkeys. And there are some unanswered questions, such as whether cloud backups from iOS to Android will be compatible. The password isn’t quite dead yet, but it’s getting there. Apple’s Killing the Password. Here’s Everything You Need to Know (May require free registration to view)
  23. Gadgets galore Apple’s iPhone 14 launch event is just days away, and it’s expected to showcase a range of new devices — not just a new iPhone. We’re also on the lookout for three (yes, we said three) new Apple Watch models and even a refreshed pair of AirPods Pro earbuds. Apple’s holding a small in-person event at its Apple Park campus and will stream the show online, similar to what it did with WWDC in June. Here’s what we might see at Apple’s hardware-heavy event, which is slated for September 7th, 2022, at 1PM ET. The iPhone 14 Pro and Pro Max get some major upgrades Apple will, of course, reveal the brand new iPhone 14 in September, but the standard model likely won’t be the star of the show. The iPhone 14 Pro and Pro Max are expected to carry the bulk of the new and exciting features. Photo by Vjeran Pavic / The Verge There are three big features expected in the 14 Pro and Pro Max: a customizable always-on display (a feature Android phones have had for years); a 48-megapixel rear camera with a larger sensor; and a screen that gets rid of the notch in favor of smaller camera cutouts. Speaking of the cutouts, a report from MacRumors indicates the camera and speaker will have separate cutouts when the screen’s turned off but will form one long pill shape when it’s powered on. A tipster told 9to5Mac that Apple will use the extra space between the two cutouts to more prominently display the privacy indicators for the camera and microphone, which users may be able to tap into for more information about what’s currently accessing them. 9to5Mac also said Apple may optimize its Camera app for its Pro devices by shifting some of its controls, like the flash and autofocus button to the top of the screen, with others housed directly beneath the cutout. The phone should also get an upgraded A16 processing chip and potentially have two new colors: blue and deep purple. It’s also rumored to support a faster 30W charger (but the phone itself probably won’t come with USB-C just yet), as well as start with 256GB of storage, a jump from the 128GB floor that previous Pro and Pro Max models have. The Pro line is also rumored to have slimmer bezels and bigger batteries. It’s a solid list of new features that Apple may use to justify a rumored price hike for its higher-end iPhones. However, it doesn’t seem like the standard version of the iPhone 14 will come with many major changes. The biggest update to the non-Pro model is expected to be the introduction of a larger 6.7-inch display in the iPhone 14 Max — if it’s even called that. Purported phone packaging from Apple’s factory indicates that the company might be planning to swap the “Max” branding on the standard iPhone model for “Plus,” a moniker Apple hasn’t used since the iPhone 8 Plus. Naming aside, rumors from analyst Ming-Chi Kuo indicate that the iPhone 14 (plus the Pro and Pro Max) may also have a better selfie camera that uses autofocus. Performance-wise, the base iPhone 14 will likely use the same A15 processor used in the iPhone 13 series. And if you’re a small phone lover, I’m sorry to say that a new Mini likely won’t make an appearance this year. Rumors have also been swirling about the iPhone 14 coming with satellite connectivity, something users can take advantage of in emergency situations without cellular service. Satellite connectivity was rumored for the iPhone 13 last year, and in February, satellite company Globalstar acquired 17 new satellites “to provide continuous satellite services to the potential customer,” which some speculate is Apple. The “Far Out” event branding could also hint at this possibility. New Apple Watch models: Series 8, SE, and “Pro” Apple’s gearing up to launch three new Apple Watch models: the Watch Series 8, a refreshed SE, and a new rugged “Pro” model designed for athletes who partake in extreme sports. Let’s start with the Series 8. According to Bloomberg reporter Mark Gurman, the next-gen watch will come equipped with a new S8 chip, but it won’t offer a notable performance upgrade over the S7 and S6 chips. While Apple isn’t expected to include a way to monitor your blood pressure just yet, it may come with a temperature sensor that will detect if you have a fever, as well as fertility-tracking features. Photo by Vjeran Pavic / The Verge Meanwhile, the new Apple Watch SE is expected to replace the budget Watch Series 3. It will likely come with the same S8 chip, an upgrade over the S5 chip the 2020 SE model uses. Other than that, it doesn’t look like any other huge changes are in store — it’s expected to retain the same display size as the current SE. As for the rumored rugged Apple Watch “Pro,” Gurman believes it could come with a larger “nearly 2-inch display” that’s “more shatter-resistant.” It may also sport a “strong metal” case instead of a rubberized exterior that was hinted at previously. A report from the Japan-based Mac Otakara adds more color to these rumors, noting that the Pro model could have a flat-edged display with a larger 47mm case, an increase from the Apple Watch Series 7’s 41mm and 45mm sizes. It may not even fit into older Watch bands. While we’re not expecting the first variation of this watch to come with satellite connectivity, Gurman predicts a future model of the Pro watch could have satellite features, which is something the company has reportedly discussed internally. Even without the satellite features, don’t expect this watch to be cheap — Gurman expects it to cost anywhere from $900 to $999. The next generation of the AirPods Pro The AirPods Pro haven’t received an update since their initial launch in 2019. Now, nearly three years later, we may finally see the release of the AirPods Pro 2 at the Far Out event. First off, expect them to look different. The new AirPods Pro may resemble the Beats Fit Pro, potentially with an in-ear wing tip design that drops the stem. They could also have a focus on fitness tracking thanks to the potential for upgraded motion sensors. Kuo also hinted at the possibility of the AirPods Pro supporting lossless audio, allowing for higher-quality sound. This would also make the AirPods Pro 2 the first model to use the Apple Lossless Audio Codec (ALAC) — even the high-end AirPods Max don’t support it. If the AirPods Pro 2 do end up supporting the Apple Lossless Audio Codec, it’ll be interesting to see how Apple manages to get around the limitations of Bluetooth, which generally requires compressing audio quality. Photo by Chris Welch / The Verge However, reports from MacRumors and 9to5Mac suggest Apple could take a different approach. Apple may instead be working on adding Bluetooth 5.2 support, which uses a new codec that’s supposed to transmit audio more efficiently, allowing for either higher quality audio or reduced battery usage. A recent filing with the Bluetooth SIG products database indicates Apple may be looking into adopting the technology for the AirPods Pro, and 9to5Mac says it saw references to the technology in iOS 16’s code. The AirPods Pro 2 charging case may also get an upgrade. It may come with a small speaker that makes a sound when you try to locate it via the Find My app. Only the AirPods themselves make a sound right now, and adding the capability to the case could come in handy if it ever gets separated from your AirPods. We may get iOS 16 and watchOS 9 launch dates We first heard about iOS 16 when Apple announced it in June, and we have a pretty good idea of what to expect based on what we’ve seen from the public beta. Gurman says Apple wrapped up development last week, and the company is likely to launch a finalized version of iOS 16 within about a week of its iPhone 14 event. iOS 16 brings a number of new features, including the ability to edit and unsend messages as well as a customizable lock screen. It also introduces repositioned notifications that appear at the bottom of your lock screen and a Live Activities lock screen widget that provides updates on real-time events, such as sports scores or food delivery progress. Oh yeah, and battery percentage is back... but not in the way you might expect (or like). Luckily, Apple may find a way to squeeze in the old battery percentage indicator — which shows the battery icon and percentage side-by-side — in the iPhone 14 Pro’s status bar now that we’re expecting a design with no notch. Photo by Victoria Song / The Verge In addition to iOS 16, Apple could also launch watchOS 9 alongside its three new smartwatches. The watchOS 9 beta has been out for a couple of months now, and it’s set to bring quite a few improvements to the Apple Watch. This includes new running metrics, medication reminders, sleep stage tracking, passive AFib monitoring, and enhanced watchface customization. Is that all? It looks like this is it for this particular Apple event, but luckily, we shouldn’t have to wait much longer for another round of new Apple products. Apple’s expected to return to its old pre-pandemic schedule of holding an iPhone event in September and then a separate event in October to showcase its new iPads and Macs. That’s when we can expect a new M2-equipped iPad Pro as well as an entry-level iPad with the A14 chip. Apple’s also rumored to release three new Macs, including a Mac Mini, Mac Pro, and MacBook Pro, all with Apple’s M2 chip. iPadOS and macOS Ventura will likely arrive around this time as well. We’re still waiting for Apple’s long-rumored mixed reality headset, too, and it would be kind of a long shot to expect the company to show it off this year. It looks like Apple is making some progress, though. Recent trademark filings indicate that Apple’s looking into “Reality” branding for its new headset, which its board of directors reportedly got to test out earlier this year. Kuo predicts the device won’t launch until January 2023. And remember that rumored iPhone subscription we heard about earlier this year? There’s apparently a possibility that it could launch by the end of this year according to Gurman, potentially giving you the option to pay a monthly fee to “lease” an iPhone or iPad. Update August 24th, 12:05PM ET: Updated to confirm that Apple’s event is happening on September 7th. Update August 29th, 11:29AM ET: Updated to add new rumors surrounding Apple’s upcoming devices. Update August 31st, 5:47PM ET: Updated to add additional rumors about the iPhone 14. Update August 31st, 6:19PM ET: Updated to add more information regarding the iPhone 14’s cutout. Update September 4th, 3:44PM ET: Updated to add more iPhone 14 and Apple Watch rumors. What to expect from Apple’s iPhone 14 event
  24. Gadgets galore Apple’s iPhone 14 launch event is just weeks away, and it’s expected to showcase a range of new devices — not just a new iPhone. We’re also on the lookout for three (yes, we said three) new Apple Watch models and even a refreshed pair of AirPods Pro earbuds. Apple’s holding a small in-person event at its Apple Park campus and will stream the show online, similar to what it did with WWDC in June. Here’s what we might see at Apple’s hardware-heavy event, which is slated for September 7th, 2022, at 1PM ET. The iPhone 14 Pro and Pro Max get some major upgrades Apple will, of course, reveal the brand new iPhone 14 in September, but the standard model likely won’t be the star of the show. The iPhone 14 Pro and Pro Max are expected to carry the bulk of the new and exciting features. Photo by Vjeran Pavic / The Verge There are three big features expected in the 14 Pro and Pro Max: an always-on display (a feature Android phones have had for years); a 48-megapixel rear camera with a larger sensor; and a screen that gets rid of the notch in favor of smaller camera cutouts. Speaking of the cutouts, a report from MacRumors indicates the camera and speaker will have separate cutouts when the screen’s turned off but will form one long pill shape when it’s powered on. A tipster told 9to5Mac that Apple will use the extra space between the two cutouts to more prominently display the privacy indicators for the camera and microphone, which users may be able to tap into for more information about what’s currently accessing them. 9to5Mac also said Apple may optimize its Camera app for its Pro devices by shifting some of its controls, like the flash and autofocus button to the top of the screen, with others housed directly beneath the cutout. The phone should also get an upgraded A16 processing chip and potentially have two new colors: blue and deep purple. It’s also rumored to support a faster 30W charger (but the phone itself probably won’t come with USB-C just yet), as well as start with 256GB of storage, a jump from the 128GB floor that previous Pro and Pro Max models have. It’s a solid list of new features that Apple may use to justify a rumored price hike. However, it doesn’t seem like the standard version of the iPhone 14 will come with many major changes. The biggest update to the non-Pro model is expected to be the introduction of a larger 6.7-inch display in the iPhone 14 Max — if it’s even called that. Purported phone packaging from Apple’s factory indicates that the company might be planning to swap the “Max” branding on the standard iPhone model for “Plus,” a moniker Apple hasn’t used since the iPhone 8 Plus. Naming aside, rumors from analyst Ming-Chi Kuo indicate that the iPhone 14 (plus the Pro and Pro Max) may also have a better selfie camera that uses autofocus. Performance-wise, the base iPhone 14 will likely use the same A15 processor used in the iPhone 13 series. And if you’re a small phone lover, I’m sorry to say that a new Mini likely won’t make an appearance this year. Rumors have also been swirling about the iPhone 14 coming with satellite connectivity, something users can take advantage of in emergency situations without cellular service. Satellite connectivity was rumored for the iPhone 13 last year, and in February, satellite company Globalstar acquired 17 new satellites “to provide continuous satellite services to the potential customer,” which some speculate is Apple. The “Far Out” event branding could also hint at this possibility. New Apple Watch models: Series 8, SE, and “Pro” Apple’s gearing up to launch three new Apple Watch models: the Watch Series 8, a refreshed SE, and a new rugged “Pro” model designed for athletes who partake in extreme sports. Let’s start with the Series 8. According to Bloomberg reporter Mark Gurman, the next-gen watch will come equipped with a new S8 chip, but it won’t offer a notable performance upgrade over the S7 and S6 chips. While Apple isn’t expected to include a way to monitor your blood pressure just yet, it may come with a temperature sensor that will detect if you have a fever. Photo by Vjeran Pavic / The Verge Meanwhile, the new Apple Watch SE is expected to replace the budget Watch Series 3. It will likely come with the same S8 chip, an upgrade over the S5 chip the 2020 SE model uses. Other than that, it doesn’t look like any other huge changes are in store — it’s expected to retain the same display size as the current SE. As for the rumored rugged Apple Watch “Pro,” Gurman believes it could come with a larger “nearly 2-inch display” that’s “more shatter-resistant.” It may also sport a “strong metal” case instead of a rubberized exterior that was hinted at previously. A report from the Japan-based Mac Otakara adds more color to these rumors, noting that the Pro model could have a flat-edged display with a larger 47mm case, an increase from the Apple Watch Series 7’s 41mm and 45mm sizes. It may not even fit into older Watch bands. While we’re not expecting the first variation of this watch to come with satellite connectivity, Gurman predicts a future model of the Pro watch could have satellite features, which is something the company has reportedly discussed internally. Even without the satellite features, don’t expect this watch to be cheap — Gurman expects it to cost anywhere from $900 to $999. The next generation of the AirPods Pro The AirPods Pro haven’t received an update since their initial launch in 2019. Now, nearly three years later, we may finally see the release of the AirPods Pro 2. First off, expect them to look different. The new AirPods Pro may resemble the Beats Fit Pro, potentially with an in-ear wing tip design that drops the stem. They could also have a focus on fitness tracking thanks to the potential for upgraded motion sensors. Kuo also hinted at the possibility of the AirPods Pro supporting lossless audio, allowing for higher-quality sound. This would also make the AirPods Pro 2 the first model to use the Apple Lossless Audio Codec (ALAC) — even the high-end AirPods Max don’t support it. If the AirPods Pro 2 do end up supporting the Apple Lossless Audio Codec, it’ll be interesting to see how Apple manages to get around the limitations of Bluetooth, which generally requires compressing audio quality. Photo by Chris Welch / The Verge However, reports from MacRumorsand 9to5Macsuggest Apple could take a different approach. Apple may instead be working on adding Bluetooth 5.2 support, which uses a new codec that’s supposed to transmit audio more efficiently, allowing for either higher quality audio or reduced battery usage. A recent filing with the Bluetooth SIG products database indicates Apple may be looking into adopting the technology for the AirPods Pro, and 9to5Mac says it saw references to the technology in iOS 16’s code. The AirPods Pro 2 charging case may also get an upgrade. It may come with a small speaker that makes a sound when you try to locate it via the Find My app. Only the AirPods themselves make a sound right now, and adding the capability to the case could come in handy if it ever gets separated from your AirPods. We may get iOS 16 and watchOS 9 launch dates We first heard about iOS 16 when Apple announced it in June, and we have a pretty good idea of what to expect based on what we’ve seen from the public beta. Gurman says Apple wrapped up development last week, and the company is likely to launch a finalized version of iOS 16 within about a week of its iPhone 14 event. iOS 16 brings a number of new features, including the ability to edit and unsend messages as well as a customizable lock screen. It also introduces repositioned notifications that appear at the bottom of your lock screen and a Live Activities lock screen widget that provides updates on real-time events, such as sports scores or food delivery progress. Oh yeah, and battery percentage is back... but not in the way you might expect (or like). Photo by Victoria Song / The Verge In addition to iOS 16, Apple could also launch watchOS 9 alongside its three new smartwatches. The watchOS 9 beta has been out for a couple of months now, and it’s set to bring quite a few improvements to the Apple Watch. This includes new running metrics, medication reminders, sleep stage tracking, passive AFib monitoring, and enhanced watchface customization. Is that all? It looks like this is it for this particular Apple event, but luckily, we shouldn’t have to wait much longer for another round of new Apple products. Apple’s expected to return to its old pre-pandemic schedule of holding an iPhone event in September and then a separate event in October to showcase its new iPads and Macs. That’s when we can expect a new M2-equipped iPad Pro as well as an entry-level iPad with the A14 chip. Apple’s also rumored to release three new Macs, including a Mac Mini, Mac Pro, and MacBook Pro, all with Apple’s M2 chip. iPadOS and macOS Ventura will likely arrive around this time as well. We’re still waiting for Apple’s long-rumored mixed reality headset, too, and it would be kind of a long shot to expect the company to show it off this year. It looks like Apple is making some progress, though. Recent trademark filings indicate that Apple’s looking into “Reality” branding for its new headset, which its board of directors reportedly got to test out earlier this year. Kuo predicts the device won’t launch until January 2023. Update August 24th, 12:05PM ET: Updated to confirm that Apple’s event is happening on September 7th. Update August 29th, 11:29AM ET: Updated to add new rumors surrounding Apple’s upcoming devices. Update August 31st, 5:47PM ET: Updated to add additional rumors about the iPhone 14. Update August 31st, 6:19PM ET: Updated to add more information regarding the iPhone 14’s cutout. What to expect from Apple’s iPhone 14 event
  25. New iPhones and Watches: you bet. New Macs and iPads? Probably not. Apple announced a new product launch event for September 7, and it's a safe bet that we'll see the next wave of flagship iPhone models when the company's executives and product managers take the stage at the Steve Jobs Theater. Curiously, this is the earliest in the month we can remember Apple recently hosting a September event, and it also might be the earliest the company has announced the event before it happens, given that it's more than two weeks away. But those aspects aside, we don't believe this will be an especially unusual event. Apple always uses the September event to announce new iPhone and Apple Watch models, which is exactly what we expect on September 7. Here are the announcements we think we'll see during the event—and a few we think you should temper your expectations on, too. iPhone 14 and iPhone 14 Pro The iPhone 14 Pro will get some exciting new features this year, including two that have been requested for a long time. Those big changes are the introduction of an always-on screen like owners of the Samsung Galaxy flagships and many other high-end Android phones have long enjoyed, and the removal of the camera notch at the top of the screen in favor of something resembling a punch hole. Other possible improvements include a faster A16 system-on-a-chip (SoC), a bigger and better 48-megapixel rear wide camera with 8K video capture capabilities, and new features in the front-facing camera. Below: A peek some improvements in last year's iPhone 13 Pro over 2020's iPhone 12 Pro. The iPhone 13 Pro (right) increased the camera lens size over the iPhone 12 Pro (left). Another increase is predicted this year. Samuel Axon The iPhone 13 Pro (right) reduced the horizontal size of the notch compared to its predecessor (left). The new phone is expected to drop the notch entirely in favor of another embedded solution. Samuel Axon Unfortunately, all of that might come with a $100 price hike compared to the iPhone 13 Pro phones, according to one leak. By contrast, the regular, non-Pro iPhone 14 is expected to be a bit of a nothingburger for those looking forward to big changes. The base iPhone 14 might not even upgrade the chip inside the phone, opting for the A15 instead of the new A16 SoC. That said, the iPhone 14 could bump its RAM from 4GB to 6GB, offering some modest performance improvements in some situations. Unfortunately for those who like to use their phones, Apple is expected to drop the relatively low-selling mini size that we saw in the iPhone 12 and iPhone 13 lineups. Instead, the company will offer an iPhone 14 with a 6.1-inch display, and a new iPhone 14 Max with a 6.7-inch screen—the exact sizes seen on the Pro side. Apple Watch Series 8 and SE—and more We haven't heard much about big changes coming to the Apple Watch Series 8 or its cheaper cousin, the Apple Watch SE. But some kind of spec bump and minor improvements are likely for both. If that doesn't excite you much, the addition of a third Apple Watch model might: There have been myriad reports from all sorts of sources that Apple has been working on a rugged "Apple Watch Pro" meant for serious use in sports and fitness contexts. The Apple Watch Pro might not have a bunch of new features, but it could come with a more durable titanium casing, a potentially larger and more damage-resistant screen, and a steeper price tag. Refreshed AirPods Pro An update to Apple's wireless in-ear earbuds has been rumored for a while now, and we may see those rumors come to fruition on September 7. According to analyst Ming-Chi Kuo and Bloomberg reporter Mark Gurman, Apple has been working on AirPods Pro buds that would drop the stems entirely (the stems were already shorter than those seen in the cheapest AirPods model). Additionally, the earbuds would support the Apple Lossless audio format (called ALAC) and would include a charging case that "can emit a sound for users to track." AirPods Pro inside an open case. Jeff Dunn There have also been claims that the AirPods Pro might gain new fitness tracking features, but we're not certain exactly what all of those might be. Apple updated the base AirPods model pretty recently, so we don't think we'll see movement there, but it has been a little while for AirPods Max. That said, don't expect a radical update for AirPods Max, even if there is some kind of minor refresh. iOS 16 and watchOS 9 Apple is sure to announce the release dates for iOS 16 and watchOS 9 either at the event or shortly after. Both are expected to release alongside the new iPhone and Apple Watch models a week or so after the show. We've already covered what to expect from iOS 16 and watchOS 9, but look out for a review of the former from us sometime in September. What not to expect: Macs, iPads, macOS, iPadOS, or VR/AR It's not uncommon for Apple to focus almost entirely on the iPhone and Apple Watch with its September event and to introduce other products at the October event. We expect that to again be the case this year. Apple is definitely working on new iPad and Mac models, including more Macs based on the new M2 chip—and some of those may yet come just a few weeks down the line. But don't expect them on September 7. Further, Apple has historically launched iPadOS either when the new version of iOS comes out or a week or so later. But with Stage Manager and other big features coming in iPadOS 16, Apple has had a bit of a rocky beta period, and a recent Bloomberg article and then Apple confirmed what a lot of us already suspected: iPadOS 16 has been delayed to at least a few weeks down the line. For that reason, we don't expect to hear anything about iPadOS until the October event. Finally, there have been a bunch of reports that Apple plans to soon introduce a mixed reality headset. That's probably still happening, but it sounds like that's coming in 2023, not 2022. It might be coming in early 2023, but don't expect to see it this time around—despite Apple's lidar-esque teaser image. (Remember: the iPhone Pro models have lidar, too.) What to expect from Apple’s September 7 “Far Out” event
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