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  1. Adam Clark Estes January 13, 2014 4:00pm As you probably suspected, the NSA’s massive phone record collection “has had no discernible impact on preventing acts of terrorism,” according to a new study. In fact—and perhaps more interestingly—the agency’s real problem isn’t a lack of information. It’s an excess of secrecy. In the study, the New America Foundation reviewed 225 terrorism cases and found that traditional investigation and law enforcement methods actually did the most to prevent attacks. About a third of the leads in terrorism cases came from tips or an informant, while old school
  2. Terrorist organization Al Qaeda has reportedly stepped up its development of homegrown encryption technology since the Edward Snowden leaks began last June. The question puzzling some security experts is: Why? “This is hard, and the odds they are doing it correctly are low,” said cryptographer and author Bruce Schneier, citing a number of implementation issues that could arise. “People make mistakes with this stuff all the time. The question is why use something made up as opposed to OTR (Off the Record) or PGP? It’s just crazy.” The move, web intelligence company Recorded Future says, is a co
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