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  1. A person who claimed that the operators of Grooveshark were engaged in systematic copyright infringement will keep his anonymity, a court has ruled. The allegations, which were made in the comments section of an online news article, prompted Grooveshark's parent company to unmask their author. They have now failed in that mission. In 2010, Universal Music Group (UMG) sued Grooveshark owners Escape Media in the Supreme Court of the State of New York, claiming that the company infringed their copyrights by storing and subsequently distributing tracks to which UMG holds the copyrights. In 2011, news site Digital Music News (DMN) published an article which contained claims from a member of a rock band that Grooveshark had illegally hosted the band’s music and refused to take it down when notified. The article attracted around 100 comments from DMN readers, one of whom claimed to be an employee of Escape Media. The commenter, who posted under the name “Visitor”, claimed that he had regularly received “direct orders from the top” at Escape to upload music to Grooveshark’s servers. Worse still, “Visitor” claimed that the company would not fully remove infringing content, even if artists or music labels complained. These allegations were viewed as problematic by Escape since in order for a service provider to gain immunity under the Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA), it must remove copyrighted material once it becomes aware that an infringement has taken place. So, in an effort to unmask this supposed employee of theirs, in January 2012 Escape served a subpoena on Digital Music News in order to obtain “Visitor’s” identity. After DMN refused to comply, in March 2012 Escape petitioned the Los Angeles Superior Court for enforcement. DMN was subsequently ordered to comply but promptly filed an appeal. DMN argued that unmasking “Visitor” would not lead to the discovery of evidence admissible in UMG’s New York lawsuit against Escape (identifying information about “Visitor” had all been deleted) and that enforcement of the subpoena would infringe on the First Amendment rights of both DMN and “Visitor”. Ultimately the court decided that since Escape had presented a prima facie case that “Visitor’s” comments were libelous, no First Amendment protection was available. DMN was ordered to comply with the subpoena and provide a copy of its server to Escape. DMN copied the servers but lodged an appeal in attempt to avoid handing them over. This week the Court of Appeal of the State of California handed down its decision and it’s bad news for Escape. Escape had argued that proving “Visitor’s” comments to be false would help them show that the company did not supervise direct infringement of UMG’s copyrights. The Court rejected Escape’s basis for needing access to “Visitor’s” identity stating that this “out-of-court quarrel is of no consequence to the determination of UMG’s lawsuit.” Escape enjoyed no success on the privacy front either. “Even if Visitor’s identifying information was reasonably calculated to lead to admissible evidence, his or her right to privacy under the California Constitution would outweigh Escape’s need for the information,” the Court said. “That interest begins with Visitor’s need for a venue from which to be heard without fear of interference or suppression. Visitor’s anonymity also frees him or her from fear of retaliation, an even more compelling interest if Visitor truly is an Escape employee, as represented, because exposure could endanger not only his or her privacy but also livelihood.” The Court concluded with a summary of its opinion as to the value of “Visitor’s” comments. “Visitor has done nothing more than provide commentary about an ongoing public dispute in a forum that could hardly be more obscure — the busy online comments section of a digital trade newspaper,” the Court wrote. “Such commentary has become ubiquitous on the Internet and is widely perceived to carry no indicium of reliability and little weight. We will not lightly lend the subpoena power of the courts to prove, in essence, that Someone Is Wrong On The Internet.” With that the Court of Appeal ordered the trial court to vacate its order enforcing the subpoena and thereby protecting “Visitor’s” privacy. Source: TorrentFreak
  2. Online banking and shopping in America are being negatively impacted by ongoing revelations about the National Security Agency’s digital surveillance activities. That is the clear implication of a recent ESET-commissioned Harris poll which asked more than 2,000 U.S. adults ages 18 and older whether or not, given the news about the NSA’s activities, they have changed their approach to online activity. Almost half of respondents (47%) said that they have changed their online behavior and think more carefully about where they go, what they say, and what they do online. When it comes to specific Internet activities, such as email or online banking, this change in behavior translates into a worrying trend for the online economy: over one quarter of respondents (26%) said that, based on what they have learned about secret government surveillance, they are now doing less banking online and less online shopping. This shift in behavior is not good news for companies that rely on sustained or increased use of the Internet for their business model. Online Commerce Shrinkage? After 20 years of seemingly limitless expansion of Internet commerce, these poll numbers may come as something of a shock to online firms, but they were not a complete surprise to ESET researchers. Last fall we detected early signs of this phenomenon when we conducted a smaller survey of “post-Snowden” attitudes. Some respondents reported reduced online shopping and banking behavior (14% and 19% respectively). At that time it was reasonable to speculate that such changes in behavior might be a temporary blip, but our latest findings suggest otherwise. And the reasons are not hard to find: continued revelations from the Snowden documents and a lack of convincing reassurances from government about privacy protections. The news for online stores and financial services does not get any better when you dig deeper into the numbers. The economically important 18-34 age group are more likely to say they are doing less shopping online (33% compared to an overall 26%). Online retailers who rely more on female shoppers should note that 29% of women surveyed said they have reduced how much they shop online (compared to 23% of men and 26% overall). When it comes to banking online 29% of folks in that 18-34 age bracket had cut back, as had 30% of those aged 65 and older. Clearly, these findings will be of concern to the retail and financial services sectors, but the news is also bad for just about any sector of the American economy where replacing physical contact with electronic communication is part of the business model. Just under one-quarter of respondents (24%) said that, based on what they have learned about secret government surveillance, they are less inclined to use email. Important economic sectors ranging from healthcare to education and government are looking at expanded use of electronic communications as a way to cut costs and improve service levels. Those objectives could be harder to attain if a significant percentage of the public is less inclined to use those channels. We observed a higher than average contraction in email use in the 18-34 age group (32%) and in households where annual household income is under $50,000. Ongoing impact of Privacy intrusions As a recent New York Times article titled “Revelations of N.S.A. Spying Cost U.S. Tech Companies” observed: “It is impossible to see now the full economic ramifications of the spying disclosures.” However, I think that when you look at this new survey and our previous research it is clear that changes in online behavior have already taken place, changes with broad economic ramifications. Whether or not we have seen the full extent of the public’s reaction to state-sponsored mass surveillance is hard to predict, but based on this survey and the one we did last year, I would say that, if the NSA revelations continue–and I am sure they will–and if government reassurances fail to impress the public, then it is possible that the trends in behavior we are seeing right now will continue. For example, I do not see many people finding reassurance in President Obama’s recently announced plan to transfer the storage of millions of telephone records from the government to private phone companies. As we will document in our next installment of survey findings, data gathering by companies is even more of a privacy concern for some Americans than government surveillance. And in case anyone is tempted to think that this is a narrow issue of concern only to news junkies and security geeks, let me be clear: according to this latest survey, 85% of adult Americans are now at least somewhat familiar with the news about secret government surveillance of private citizens’ phone calls, emails, online activity, and so on. As to what should be done about this situation and its effects on commerce, privacy, and online behavior, I will have more findings to share in my next blog post, along with suggested strategies for companies who may be impacted. Source
  3. selesn777

    Hide IP Privacy 2.7.5.6

    Hide IP Privacy 2.7.5.6 Hide IP Privacy provides you with the most efficient online cloaks for your true IP address to guard your computer against hackers, protect your privacy while surfing the Internet, un-ban yourself from forums or blogs, and More! Why Hide IP Privacy is the best? The Most Simple And EffectiveIt only takes the touch of a finger, then the program will immediately find and acquire a spoof IP for you. Auto IP ChangingFor your web surfing being more free and secure, Hide IP Privacy could automatically change your IP address at any frequency at your will. Compatible With Various Servers And PlatformsSupports Internet Explorer, Firefox, and Opera, and works with Windows 2000/2003/XP/Vista/7. 100% Clean And SafeNo any forms of malware risk. No advertising or spam on our anonymous proxy servers, safe to install and run. Refund GuaranteeIf you are not satisfied with the product, then let us know within 30 days of purchase, and we will give you a full refund. Website: http://www.hideipprivacy.com/ Platform: Windows XP / Vista / 7 / 8 Language: Eng Tablet: Patch Size: 3,09 MB
  4. Privacy Eraser Pro 1.8.2 Build 411 + Portable Privacy Eraser is an all-in-one privacy suite that protects your privacy by cleaning up all your Internet history tracks and past computer activities. With simply one click, Privacy Eraser can quickly erase the Internet cache, cookies, browsing history, address bar history, typed urls, autocomplete form history, saved password and index.dat files of your browser, and Windows run history, search history, open/save history, recent documents, temporary files, recycle bin, clipboard, taskbar jump lists, dns cache, log files, memory dumps, error reporting and much more. Furthermore, Privacy Eraser supports plug-ins to extend cleaning features, you can easily delete the tracks left by any applications by making your own plug-ins. Privacy Eraser embedded more than 200 FREE plug-ins which supports the most popular programs such as ACDSee, Adobe Reader, Microsoft Office, WinZip, WinRAR, Windows Media Player, VLC Player, eMule, BitTorrent, Google Toolbar and many others. With the flexible, highly customizable and open plug-in architecture, you can even customize your own exclusive Privacy Eraser! Privacy Eraser supports popular web browsers such as Internet Explorer, Mozilla Firefox, Google Chrome, Safari, Opera and supports Microsoft Windows FAT16/FAT32/exFAT/NTFS file systems, completely implements and exceeds the US Department of Defense and NSA clearing and sanitizing standard, to gives you confidence that once erased, your file data is gone forever and can not be recovered. Major Features: April 6, 2014 - Privacy Eraser 1.8.2 Build 411 Released. Added French language supportFixed Security Options saving issueMinor GUI improvementsMinor bug fixesWebsite: http://www.privacyeraser.com/ OS: Windows 8 / 7 / Vista / XP / 2012 / 2008 / 2003 (32/64-bit) Language: ML Medicine: Patch Size: 4,68 / 14,32 Mb.
  5. Steganos Privacy Suite 15.2.1 Steganos Privacy Suite - working on a PC or laptop that's connected to the internet offers lots of advantages. But there are plenty of disadvantages too. Our laptops, USB sticks and CDs help transport documents, photos and movies all over the world. But what happens if a stranger gets a hold of the data on your hardware? USB sticks with irreplaceable vacation photos can fall out of pockets. DVDs that contain personal financial information get lost all the time. Laptops with e-mails, contact info and calendars can be accidentally left behind in taxis. All your passwords are neatly stored on an Excel sheet. But unprotected documents leave you vulnerable to data thieves. You've deleted all the data on a PC you plan to sell. But did you know that someone could easily reconstruct the data you thought was gone forever? The solution to all of these problem is Steganos Privacy Suite. Here are some key features of Steganos Privacy Suite Encrypt - Secure your files with the Safe.Level of Security - Observe your over-all level of security at a glance.Delete - With Shredder and Trace-Destructor you can eliminate files and your Browser history for good.Overview - Passwords and Favorites are securely stored and automatically populated.Features Website: http://www.steganos.com/ OS: Windows XP / Vista / 7 / 8 Language: ML Medicine: Patch Size: 46,19 MB
  6. selesn777

    SmartPCFix Pro 2.03.55

    SmartPCFix Pro 2.03.55 SmartPCFix scans your PC for unnecessary registry and junk files. It cleans junk and clutter from your PC and Internet browser, freeing up valuable disk space. Also removes remnants of malware files left behind in the registry. Search in multiple categoriesThe overall design of the application is kept close to a minimum to ensure your computer gets cleaned as fast as possible. As soon as the main window is brought up you gain access to various categories to select for the scan process, amongst which you find registry, privacy or trace cleaner. Schedule scan processes with an automatic cleanerBrowsing through the applications settings menu, you inevitably come across the Automatic Clean feature. It gives you the possibility to schedule when your computer is scanned for issues and can be set at startup, when the system is idle so it does not keep you from work, or at a specified time period. Add exceptions and manage restore pointsAnother useful feature of the application is the possibility to add exceptions to either of the categories. You can set a keyword to exclude from search, files or folders, as well as memory processes, to speed up scanning and cleaning your computer. Additionally, you are given access to a function that lets you create restore points in case certain important files were accidentally removed while trying to fix your machine. In conclusionTo sum it up, SmartPCFix is a handy utility to keep on your hard disk drive. It does not take up much space nor does it crave for system resources. The scan process is done in the blink of an eye and before you notice, you computer is safe and sound. Website: http://www.smartpcfix.com/ OS: Windows XP / Vista / 7 / 8 Language: ML Medicine: Patch Size: 2,69 Mb.
  7. Pointstone Total Privacy 6.50.350 Total Privacy is a safe and easy-to-use to use privacy protection tool that stops all those pesky snoopers such as Cookies, history, index.dat, competitors (and even your boss!) from finding the trail of your computer use that modern internet browsers and many other programs leave behind. All this can be accomplished with a single click on the mouse, or even automatically! With Total Privacy you get total confidence and peace of mind for secure computer use by completely and permanently removing all traces and history of your recent activity. What's more, Total Privacy also helps improve and optimize your computer's performance. By deleting all those unnecessary temporary files, install/uninstall records and by cleaning your internet browser cache, Total Privacy will keep your computer functioning as smoothly and as quickly as it should. Total Privacy makes use of the most advanced washing and shredding methods available today to make sure that your own private business and computer use remains exactly that - private. Get more of the full story on how the power and simplicity of Total Privacy makes it easy for you to foil the intruders who want to check up on your computer activity by following the topics below. Features Website: http://www.pointstone.com/ OS: Windows XP / Vista / 7 / 8 Language: Eng Medicine: Serial Size: 4,84 Mb.
  8. selesn777

    PrivaZer v2.21 + Portable

    PrivaZer v2.21 + Portable v2.21 (07 June 2014) New cleanups of web browsers added * Yandex Browser * CoolNovo * Superbird * BlackHawk Improved UIPrivaZer v2.21 Released : 07 June 2014Compatible : XP, Vista, Win7, Win8/8.1, 32bits & 64bitsCompatible : HDD and optimized for SSDInstall Portable
  9. O&O SafeErase Professional 7.0 Build 197 (x86/x64) O&O SafeErase is THE solution for securely deleting sensitive data from your hard disk and offers you the ultimate protection of your privacy. With just one click of the mouse, you can securely and permanently delete files, folders and partitions. The motives for deleting files are many. Old e-mail files, internet histories, file cache, financial records, company information, and private files ought to be protected from unauthorized access. Internet Security:O&O SafeErase lists per browser all the stored information – such as cookies, form data and Internet histories – which can be safely deleted either individually or combined. Once deleted, no one can trace the Internet activity, and online accounts are protected from unauthorized access. Delete an entire computer and SSDs:All files, settings, applications and operating system are deleted so that a recovery is impossible. It is possible to delete the entire computer including the system partition without boot media. After restarting the system the deletion process begins automatically. Should an SSD not support TRIM, the data is simply overwritten with zeros to avoid wear effects. Six deletion methods:Writing over data with zeros means less sensitive data can be deleted at great speed. In addition, O&O SafeErase offers a further five methods of deletion, each one differing in the amount of procedures and the type of overwriting employed. Along with standard deletion procedures used by the U.S. Departments of Defense (DoD) and the German Bundesamts für Sicherheit in der Informationstechnik (BSI), the Gutmann Methods are also available, matching the highest security requirements and writing over data 35 times. Support for multi-core processors:Deletions are hugely speeded up here as the program takes advantage of the entire performance resources of the computer. Important Features at a Glance Homepage: http://www.oo-software.com/en OS: Windows XP / Vista / 7 / 8 / 8.1 (x86-x64) Language: Eng Medicine: Keygen Size: 14,21 / 13,53 Mb.
  10. Privacy Eraser Pro 2.7 Build 578 Privacy Eraser is an all-in-one privacy suite that protects your privacy by cleaning up all your Internet history tracks and past computer activities. With simply one click, Privacy Eraser can quickly erase the Internet cache, cookies, browsing history, address bar history, typed urls, autocomplete form history, saved password and index.dat files of your browser, and Windows run history, search history, open/save history, recent documents, temporary files, recycle bin, clipboard, taskbar jump lists, dns cache, log files, memory dumps, error reporting and much more. Furthermore, Privacy Eraser supports plug-ins to extend cleaning features, you can easily delete the tracks left by any applications by making your own plug-ins. Privacy Eraser embedded more than 200 FREE plug-ins which supports the most popular programs such as ACDSee, Adobe Reader, Microsoft Office, WinZip, WinRAR, Windows Media Player, VLC Player, eMule, BitTorrent, Google Toolbar and many others. With the flexible, highly customizable and open plug-in architecture, you can even customize your own exclusive Privacy Eraser! Privacy Eraser supports popular web browsers such as Internet Explorer, Mozilla Firefox, Google Chrome, Safari, Opera and supports Microsoft Windows FAT16/FAT32/exFAT/NTFS file systems, completely implements and exceeds the US Department of Defense and NSA clearing and sanitizing standard, to gives you confidence that once erased, your file data is gone forever and can not be recovered. Major Features: Privacy Eraser 2.7 Build 578 Released. Website: http://www.privacyeraser.com/ OS: Windows 8 / 7 / Vista / XP / 2012 / 2008 / 2003 (x32-x64) Language: ML Medicine: Patch (Only x32) Size: 5,73 Mb.
  11. Privacy Eraser Pro 2.5.0 Build 522 Privacy Eraser is an all-in-one privacy suite that protects your privacy by cleaning up all your Internet history tracks and past computer activities. With simply one click, Privacy Eraser can quickly erase the Internet cache, cookies, browsing history, address bar history, typed urls, autocomplete form history, saved password and index.dat files of your browser, and Windows run history, search history, open/save history, recent documents, temporary files, recycle bin, clipboard, taskbar jump lists, dns cache, log files, memory dumps, error reporting and much more. Furthermore, Privacy Eraser supports plug-ins to extend cleaning features, you can easily delete the tracks left by any applications by making your own plug-ins. Privacy Eraser embedded more than 200 FREE plug-ins which supports the most popular programs such as ACDSee, Adobe Reader, Microsoft Office, WinZip, WinRAR, Windows Media Player, VLC Player, eMule, BitTorrent, Google Toolbar and many others. With the flexible, highly customizable and open plug-in architecture, you can even customize your own exclusive Privacy Eraser! Privacy Eraser supports popular web browsers such as Internet Explorer, Mozilla Firefox, Google Chrome, Safari, Opera and supports Microsoft Windows FAT16/FAT32/exFAT/NTFS file systems, completely implements and exceeds the US Department of Defense and NSA clearing and sanitizing standard, to gives you confidence that once erased, your file data is gone forever and can not be recovered. Major Features: Privacy Eraser 2.5.0 Build 522 Released. Website: http://www.privacyeraser.com/ OS: Windows 8 / 7 / Vista / XP / 2012 / 2008 / 2003 (x32-x64) Language: ML Medicine: Patch (Only x32) Size: 10,84 Mb.
  12. Web users and developers should take new steps to avoid surveillance by the U.S. National Security Agency and other spy organizations, a group of privacy and digital rights advocates said Monday. The 30-plus groups, including Fight for the Future, Demand Progress, Reddit, Free Press and the Libertarian Party, have set June 5 as the day to "reset the 'Net" by deploying new privacy tools. June 5 is the anniversary of the first news stories about NSA surveillance based on leaks by former agency contractor Edward Snowden. Governments are building a "prison" around the Internet, the groups said in a video. "But government spies have a weakness," the video said. "They can hack anybody, but they can't hack everybody. Folks like the NSA depend on collecting insecure data from tapped fiber. They depend on our mistakes -- mistakes we can fix." The groups are encouraging Web users and developers to use privacy and security tools HTTPS, a secure version of HTTP, HTTP Strict Transport Security (HSTS), a Web security policy tool, and Perfect Forward Secrecy (PFS), a public key cryptography tool. "HTTPS, HSTS, and PFS are powerful tools that make mass spying much more difficult," the groups say on Resetthenet.org. "Until websites use them, we're sunk: agencies like the NSA can spy on everything. Once they're ubiquitous, mass surveillance is much harder and more precarious -- even if you're the NSA." The NSA and the U.S. Department of Justice have defended the surveillance programs, saying they are targeted at terrorists and related crimes and are necessary to protect U.S. security. Source
  13. While an Internet user's IP address is often visible, significant effort is required to convert that into a real-life identity. So imagine what would happen if you could type the IP address of an Internet user into a web browser and receive his phone number in return. Unbelievably, that happened this week. Websites can’t function without them and a user must be allocated one before he or she can begin using the Internet. Without doubt, IP addresses one of the most important elements underpinning today’s online experience. While website IP addresses are necessarily public information, IP addresses of individual users are by their very nature a lot more sensitive. Rather than identifying a web server designed to attract traffic, IP addresses operated by regular Internet users are often considered personal information. Of course, it’s fairly common knowledge that the IP addresses of file-sharers become publicly visible when they enter BitTorrent swarms for example, but matching those IP addresses to real-life identities is a complex process wrapped up in privacy laws designed to protect the consumer. During the past week, however, it became evident that users of a Scandinavian ISP could be traced back to their real-life identities simply by using their IP address. Discovered by Norwegian site Dinside, this privacy disaster stems from the software installed on routers supplied by local ISP NextGenTel. By simply entering the IP address of another NextGenTel user into a standard web browser, users were presented with a webpage containing router status information. The page also revealed the telephone number of the user behind the entered IP address. Armed with a telephone number and a directory site such as 1881.no, all it took was a few clicks to find out the name and address of the person behind not only the telephone number, but also the original IP address. After being alerted to the issue NextGenTel took action to fix the security hole by updating the relevant software, but the episode is a shining example of how years of care over personal information can be undone in an instant. One of Norway’s biggest privacy cases in recent times involved a BitTorrent user who allegedly leaked a hit local movie to The Pirate Bay. Law firm Simonsen had the IP address of the leaker but desperately needed to convert that into a real-life identity in order to pursue legal action. That case went all the way to the Supreme Court when the ISP behind that IP address refused to hand over its customer’s private details. Needless to say, that lengthy process would have been endlessly easier if that customer had been a NextGenTel customer. Simonsen could’ve accessed the Internet via NextGenTel, entered the IP address into their web browser, and used the telephone number to reach their target there and then – or called round for a visit, whichever was easier. In a comment to Dinside, NextGenTel CTO Jørn E. Hodne said his company were taking the matter seriously and were attempting to put things right by fixing software and reporting themselves to the country’s Data Inspectorate. “We’ve started the [software] update and even reported the matter to the Inspectorate,” Hodne said. “The world we live in is very complex, but this is our responsibility.” Source: TorrentFreak
  14. The White House today unveiled a five-point plan to end the National Security Agency’s bulk collection of phone call metadata, preserving what it says is a balance between the intelligence community’s national security needs and the public’s desire to maintain its privacy. The proposal ends the government’s collection of phone records under Section 215 of the PATRIOT Act as it exists today, keeping that data with telecommunications providers who will store those records for 18 months as they are currently federally mandated to do. The government would have access to the records only under approval from the secret Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court (FISC), which must approve the querying of a suspect phone number and only after judicial approval based on a national security concern. Currently, the NSA collects and stores call metadata, and maps connections between numbers belonging to individuals suspected of terrorism or threatening national security. As the Snowden leaks began last June, the depths of NSA surveillance, including dragnet capturing of all Americans’ phone calls without warrants, drew the ire of civil libertarians, mainstream media and politicians on both sides of the aisle. The new plan was ordered by President Obama during a Jan. 17 address to the nation on surveillance. During that speech, he ordered the Attorney General and the intelligence community to work together on an adequate solution that would alter the collection of data under Section 215. Obama imposed a March 28 deadline for the proposal, the day FISC is expected to renew the NSA program for another 90-day cycle, the final time it will do so. The White House proposal, hints of which were released two days ago in a New York Times report, also changes the number of hops the government will be able to collect between suspects from three to two. While apparently a concession, ACLU National Security advisor and attorney Brett Max Kaufman told Threatpost this remains a red flag for privacy advocates. “It’s unclear, if the government is able to satisfy FISC’s standard of a reasonable, articulable suspicion, why anyone connected to that person would also satisfy that same standard to get their call records?” Kaufman said. The president’s proposal was a bit more stringent than a similar House Intelligence Committee bill that was introduced on Tuesday, which did not require prior judicial approval; a judge would rule on a request only after the FBI submits it to a provider. Verizon general counsel Randal Milch said the provider supports the efforts to end bulk collection. “At this early point in the process, we propose this basic principle that should guide the effort: the reformed collection process should not require companies to store data for longer than, or in formats that differ from, what they already do for business purposes,” Milch said. “If Verizon receives a valid request for business records, we will respond in a timely way, but companies should not be required to create, analyze or retain records for reasons other than business purposes.” The final two provisions of today’s official proposal say the court-approved numbers can only be used for a limited period of time without again requiring approval from FISC. “The production of records would be ongoing and prospective,” the proposal said. Also, under court order, the phone companies would be required to provide technical assistance to ensure the records can be accessed in a timely fashion and in an accessible format. The White House plan would need to be ratified by Congress in order to go into effect, and because of this, the Department of Justice will seek another 90-day renewal from FISC for the program, much to the chagrin of experts. “EPIC is encouraged by the President’s continued commitment to end the bulk collection program … however, the renewal of the FISC order on Friday would be a disappointing development,” said Alan Butler, appellate advocacy counsel for the Electronic Privacy Information Center (EPIC). “The bulk collection program will not end until the FISC order expires without the President seeking its renewal.” Source
  15. Read about five most popular and chosen by community as the most secure/trusted VPN Service Providers: Private Internet AccessTorGuardIPVanishDIYCyberGhostThere is a vote as well in order to determine the winner. Source
  16. NSA general counsel Rajesh De contradicts months of angry denials from big companies like Yahoo and Google De said communications content and associated metadata harvested by the NSA occurred with the knowledge of the companies. Photo: KeystoneUSA-Zuma/Rex The senior lawyer for the National Security Agency stated unequivocally on Wednesday that US technology companies were fully aware of the surveillance agency’s widespread collection of data, contradicting months of angry denials from the firms. Rajesh De, the NSA general counsel, said all communications content and associated metadata harvested by the NSA under a 2008 surveillance law occurred with the knowledge of the companies – both for the internet collection program known as Prism and for the so-called “upstream” collection of communications moving across the internet. Asked during a Wednesday hearing of the US government’s institutional privacy watchdog if collection under the law, known as Section 702 or the Fisa Amendments Act, occurred with the “full knowledge and assistance of any company from which information is obtained,” De replied: “Yes.” When the Guardian and the Washington Post broke the Prism story in June, thanks to documents leaked by whistleblower Edward Snowden, nearly all the companies listed as participating in the program – Yahoo, Apple, Google, Microsoft, Facebook and AOL – claimed they did not know about a surveillance practice described as giving NSA vast access to their customers’ data. Some, like Apple, said they had “never heard” the term Prism. De explained: “Prism was an internal government term that as the result of leaks became the public term,” De said. “Collection under this program was a compulsory legal process, that any recipient company would receive.” After the hearing, De said that the same knowledge, and associated legal processes, also apply when the NSA harvests communications data not from companies directly but in transit across the internet, under Section 702 authority. The disclosure of Prism resulted in a cataclysm in technology circles, with tech giants launching extensive PR campaigns to reassure their customers of data security and successfully pressing the Obama administration to allow them greater leeway to disclose the volume and type of data requests served to them by the government. Last week, Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg said he had called US president Barack Obama to voice concern about “the damage the government is creating for all our future.” There was no immediate response from the tech companies to De’s comments on Wednesday. It is unclear what sort of legal process the government serves on a company to compel communications content and metadata access under Prism or through upstream collection. Documents leaked from Snowden indicate that the NSA possesses unmediated access to the company data. The secret Fisa court overseeing US surveillance for the purposes of producing foreign intelligence issues annual authorisations blessing NSA’s targeting and associated procedures under Section 702. Passed in 2008, Section 702 retroactively gave cover of law to a post-9/11 effort permitting the NSA to collect phone, email, internet and other communications content when one party to the communication is reasonably believed to be a non-American outside the United States. The NSA stores Prism data for five years and communications taken directly from the internet for two years. While Section 702 forbids the intentional targeting of Americans or people inside the United States – a practice known as “reverse targeting” – significant amounts of Americans’ phone calls and emails are swept up in the process of collection. In 2011, according to a now-declassified Fisa court ruling, the NSA was found to have collected tens of thousands of emails between Americans, which a judge on the court considered a violation of the US constitution and which the NSA says it is technologically incapable of fixing. Renewed in December 2012 over the objections of senate intelligence committee members Ron Wyden and Mark Udall, Section 702 also permits NSA analysts to search through the collected communications for identifying information about Americans, an amendment to so-called “minimisation” rules revealed by the Guardian in August and termed the “backdoor search loophole” by Wyden. De and his administration colleagues, testifying before the Privacy and Civil Liberties Oversight Board, strongly rejected suggestions by the panel that a court authorise searches for Americans’ information inside the 702 databases. “If you have to go back to court every time you look at the information in your custody, you can imagine that would be quite burdensome,” deputy assistant attorney general Brad Wiegmann told the board. De argued that once the Fisa court permits the collection annually, analysts ought to be free to comb through it, and stated that there were sufficient privacy safeguards for Americans after collection and querying had occurred. “That information is at the government’s disposal to review in the first instance,” De said. De also stated that the NSA is not permitted to search for Americans’ data from communications taken directly off the internet, citing greater risks to privacy. Neither De nor any other US official discussed data taken from the internet under different legal authorities. Different documents Snowden disclosed, published by the Washington Post, indicated that NSA takes data as it transits between Yahoo and Google data centers, an activity reportedly conducted not under Section 702 but under a seminal executive order known as 12333. The NSA’s Wednesday comments contradicting the tech companies about the firms’ knowledge of Prism risk entrenching tensions with the firms NSA relies on for an effort that Robert Litt, general counsel for the director of national intelligence, told the board was “one of the most valuable collection tools that we have.” “All 702 collection is pursuant to court directives, so they have to know,” De reiterated to the Guardian. Source
  17. Pointstone Total Privacy 6.47.310 Total Privacy is a safe and easy-to-use to use privacy protection tool that stops all those pesky snoopers such as Cookies, history, index.dat, competitors (and even your boss!) from finding the trail of your computer use that modern internet browsers and many other programs leave behind. All this can be accomplished with a single click on the mouse, or even automatically! With Total Privacy you get total confidence and peace of mind for secure computer use by completely and permanently removing all traces and history of your recent activity. What's more, Total Privacy also helps improve and optimize your computer's performance. By deleting all those unnecessary temporary files, install/uninstall records and by cleaning your internet browser cache, Total Privacy will keep your computer functioning as smoothly and as quickly as it should. Total Privacy makes use of the most advanced washing and shredding methods available today to make sure that your own private business and computer use remains exactly that - private. Get more of the full story on how the power and simplicity of Total Privacy makes it easy for you to foil the intruders who want to check up on your computer activity by following the topics below. Features Website: http://www.pointstone.com/ OS: Windows XP / Vista / 7 / 8 Language: Eng Medicine: Serial Size: 4,84 Mb.
  18. Last week, in relation to the arrest of Alex Kibkalo on theft of trade secret charges, his indictment revealed that Microsoft had accessed personal Hotmail emails in trying to find the source of the thefts. Microsoft then issued a pair of statements clarifying their stance, and making some changes in their policies. Now today, after continued backlash from the tech press and on Twitter, etc., Microsoft General Counsel Brad Smith has posted additional changes to Microsoft’s policy: Effective immediately, if we receive information indicating that someone is using our services to traffic in stolen intellectual or physical property from Microsoft, we will not inspect a customer’s private content ourselves. Instead, we will refer the matter to law enforcement if further action is required. In addition to changing company policy, in the coming months we will incorporate this change in our customer terms of service, so that it’s clear to consumers and binding on Microsoft. While Microsoft, under its current terms of service, did have the authority to inspect the emails, Smith goes on to say that in this new “post-Snowden” era, where Microsoft is calling on governments to “rely on formal legal processes and the rule of law for surveillance activities”, that it is time to hold itself up to higher standards, too: While our own search was clearly within our legal rights, it seems apparent that we should apply a similar principle and rely on formal legal processes for our own investigations involving people who we suspect are stealing from us. Therefore, rather than inspect the private content of customers ourselves in these instances, we should turn to law enforcement and their legal procedures. Smith goes on to announce that Microsoft has called upon the “advocacy community” to undertake a project, convened by the Cneter for Democracy and Technology with the Electronic Frontier Foundation as a key participant, to further the discussion on “the best solutions for the future of digital services”. Microsoft has set itself up to higher standards with its Scroogled campaigns, and while there’s work to do, appears to be serious about dealing with issues of privacy and personal information. Have they done enough? Source
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  20. Steganos Privacy Suite 15.2.4 Revision 10969 Steganos Privacy Suite - working on a PC or laptop that's connected to the internet offers lots of advantages. But there are plenty of disadvantages too. Our laptops, USB sticks and CDs help transport documents, photos and movies all over the world. But what happens if a stranger gets a hold of the data on your hardware? USB sticks with irreplaceable vacation photos can fall out of pockets. DVDs that contain personal financial information get lost all the time. Laptops with e-mails, contact info and calendars can be accidentally left behind in taxis. All your passwords are neatly stored on an Excel sheet. But unprotected documents leave you vulnerable to data thieves. You've deleted all the data on a PC you plan to sell. But did you know that someone could easily reconstruct the data you thought was gone forever? The solution to all of these problem is Steganos Privacy Suite. Here are some key features of Steganos Privacy Suite Encrypt - Secure your files with the Safe.Level of Security - Observe your over-all level of security at a glance.Delete - With Shredder and Trace-Destructor you can eliminate files and your Browser history for good.Overview - Passwords and Favorites are securely stored and automatically populated.Features Changes in Version 15.2 Adapting to the Telekom-Mediencenter-AutorisierungWebsite: http://www.steganos.com/ OS: Windows XP / Vista / 7 / 8 Language: ML Medicine: Key Size: 46,25 MB
  21. A 2010 decision by Switzerland's highest court to acknowledge the privacy rights of file-sharers effectively outlawed the tracking of BitTorrent users. That position means that the country occupies the new 2014 Watch List of the International Creativity and Theft-Prevention Caucus on Capitol Hill along with other problem nations China, Russia and India. Over the past 12 years the Congressional International Anti-Piracy Caucus has worked to highlight enforcement practices in need of improvement and to place countries perceived to be falling short of United States standards under the spotlight. Yesterday the caucus became the International Creativity and Theft-Prevention Caucus, a change of name shunning the term ‘piracy’ in favor of an artist-focused theme that furthers the notion that infringement is the same as stealing. The Watch List As usual there are international winners and losers in the caucus report. On the up are Italy and the Philippines, with the former taking especially drastic steps to combat online file-sharing, including the blocking of ‘pirate’ sites by an administrative body, no court process required. “In light of the reforms undertaken and a greater commitment to enforcing the law, both nations were removed from the Special 301 Report for the first time in its 25 year history. The caucus applauds Italy and the Philippines for undertaking reforms that recognize the importance of fostering creativity,” the report reads. But in terms of improvements, the praise stopped there. In the file-sharing space, Switzerland came under attack after a momentous court decision four years ago The Swiss file-sharing privacy safe haven The controversy surrounds the so-called ‘Logistep Decision‘. The Logistep anti-piracy outfit became infamous in the latter half of the last decade for their work providing tracking services for copyright trolls in Europe and the UK. In 2010 following several years of legal wrangling and controversy, the Swiss Federal Supreme Court ordered the anti-piracy outfit to stop harvesting the IP addresses of file-sharers. Underlining the notion that IP addresses are private data, the court’s decision effectively outlawed the tracking of file-sharers in Switzerland with the aim of later filing a lawsuit. In its report the caucus says that Switzerland’s timeline (18 months minimum) for bringing the country “back up to international standards for protection of copyright” is unacceptable so the country will remain on the Watch List. That position is unlikely to change anytime soon considering the long Swiss tradition of respecting privacy. Russia Unsurprisingly the main site mentioned in respect of Russia is local Facebook variant vKontakte. The site has come under sustained attacks from both the RIAA and MPAA and the caucus is happy to keep up the pressure in 2014, despite Russia’s efforts to really tighten up local copyright law. “The Caucus urges the Russian Government to take prompt action against websites that actively facilitate the theft of copyrighted materials, in particular vKontakte which was again named as a Notorious Market while remaining one of the most highly trafficked websites in Russia. Given the scale of online piracy emanating from Russia, it is crucial the Russia take serious and large scale action to enforce the law against rogue actors and end their status as a haven for digital piracy,” the report reads. China and India As expected, China is yet again subjected to criticism, despite clear signs that the country is changing its attitudes towards IP enforcement. “Though the climate for intellectual property has improved, driven in part by a growing domestic creative sector within China, the scale of piracy remains massive, inflicting substantial harm to American and Chinese creators,” the caucus says. And despite playing host to a large local creative industry, the caucus says that India is not doing enough to protect IP either, with high rates of camcorder movie piracy and a lack of effective notice-and-takedown procedures both aggravating factors. Follow-the-money Given the current collaborations between governments and the private sector with their “follow-the-money” approach to dealing with infringement, it’s no surprise that the caucus has focused a section of its report on this initiative. Current momentum sees strong international efforts to eliminate the appearance of major brands’ advertising on ‘rogue’ sites and the caucus reports further progress on that front. The Association of National Advertisers (ANA), American Association of Advertising Agencies (4As), and Interactive Advertising Bureau (IAB) have all reported taking “concrete steps” towards evaluating “digital ad assurance” technologies to keep revenue away from pirate sites. In a response, RIAA Executive Vice President Neil Turkewitz praised the caucus for its efforts. “Their work on advertising has already led to various improvements, and we hope that soon the lure of generating money from advertising will no longer be viable for sites serving as distribution hubs for infringing content,” Turkewitz said. Echoing the words of Italian Ambassador Claudio Bisogniero, who had been invited to the report’s unveiling in recognition of his country’s anti-piracy achievements, the MPAA reiterated that the protection of copyright on the Internet is essential to the development of business. “At the MPAA, we couldn’t agree more, and deeply appreciate the steps being taken by the caucus to help protect the creative industries and the millions of workers they employ – both here in the United States and abroad,” the MPAA conclude. Source: TorrentFreak
  22. Privacy Eraser Pro 2.8 Build 639 Privacy Eraser is an all-in-one privacy suite that protects your privacy by cleaning up all your Internet history tracks and past computer activities. With simply one click, Privacy Eraser can quickly erase the Internet cache, cookies, browsing history, address bar history, typed urls, autocomplete form history, saved password and index.dat files of your browser, and Windows run history, search history, open/save history, recent documents, temporary files, recycle bin, clipboard, taskbar jump lists, dns cache, log files, memory dumps, error reporting and much more. Furthermore, Privacy Eraser supports plug-ins to extend cleaning features, you can easily delete the tracks left by any applications by making your own plug-ins. Privacy Eraser embedded more than 200 FREE plug-ins which supports the most popular programs such as ACDSee, Adobe Reader, Microsoft Office, WinZip, WinRAR, Windows Media Player, VLC Player, eMule, BitTorrent, Google Toolbar and many others. With the flexible, highly customizable and open plug-in architecture, you can even customize your own exclusive Privacy Eraser! Privacy Eraser supports popular web browsers such as Internet Explorer, Mozilla Firefox, Google Chrome, Safari, Opera and supports Microsoft Windows FAT16/FAT32/exFAT/NTFS file systems, completely implements and exceeds the US Department of Defense and NSA clearing and sanitizing standard, to gives you confidence that once erased, your file data is gone forever and can not be recovered. Major Features: Privacy Eraser 2.8 Build 639 Released. Website: http://www.privacyeraser.com/ OS: Windows 8 / 7 / Vista / XP / 2012 / 2008 / 2003 (x32-x64) Language: ML Medicine: Patch (Only x32) Size: 5,77 Mb.
  23. Google has been caught again breaking privacy laws, this time in Canada where the search giant targeted Internet users with health-related ads, which is illegal in the country. The Canadian Office of the Privacy Commissioner began investigating Google when it learned that a man who used Google Search to look for information related to medical devices that treat sleep apnea was subsequently targeted by behavioral advertising on websites that were not related to his medical condition. “Behavioural advertising is a staple of the search engine and online advertising industries.” The Financial Post writes. “When a user searches for information about a particular brand or product, it’s not uncommon for that user to being seeing ads for those brands on sites that have advertising partnerships with the search engine.” However, sensitive information including health-related information should not be used for targeted advertising according to Canadian law. Google has agreed to make changes in order to stop this from happening again in the future, and to improve monitoring practices. Apparently Google also explained that it’s not entirely its fault for what happened, as the advertisers themselves are also to blame for not abiding by its own policies. Google expects to implement the required changes by next June, including properly informing advertisers about what new marketing campaigns they can conduct and upgrading its automatic review systems. This isn’t the first time Google has been caught violating privacy laws. Last week, French regulators fined the company $204,000 saying that the company’s single privacy policy is against local law. In mid-December 2013, Spain fined $1.23 million for collecting information about users without properly disclosing it. In July 2013, the U.K.’s Information Commissioners Office ordered Google to change its privacy policy to comply with local data laws. Earlier in March, Google agreed to pay $7 million to settle the Street View data collection privacy case in the U.S. while in August 2012 it settled a privacy case with the FTC for $22.5 million. The company is also facing a formal anti-competitive practices inquiry in Canada, as Google’s search business has allegedly violated Canadian laws. A similar antitrust investigation probing Google is conducted in the European Union. Source
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  25. By DAVID E. SANGER and THOM SHANKERJAN. 14, 2014 The headquarters of the National Security Agency at Fort Meade, Md. We do not use foreign intelligence capabilities to steal the trade secrets of foreign companies, an N.S.A. official said. Jim Lo Scalzo/European Pressphoto Agency WASHINGTON The National Security Agency has implanted software in nearly 100,000 computers around the world that allows the United States to conduct surveillance on those machines and can also create a digital highway for launching cyberattacks. While most of the software is inserted by gaining access to computer networks, the N.S.A. has increasingly made use of a secret technology that enables it to enter and alter data in computers even if they are not connected to the Internet, according to N.S.A. documents, computer experts and American officials. The technology, which the agency has used since at least 2008, relies on a covert channel of radio waves that can be transmitted from tiny circuit boards and USB cards inserted surreptitiously into the computers. In some cases, they are sent to a briefcase-size relay station that intelligence agencies can set up miles away from the target. President Obama spoke to reporters before a cabinet meeting at the White House on Tuesday morning. Mr. Obamas speech on spying guidelines is scheduled for Friday. The radio frequency technology has helped solve one of the biggest problems facing American intelligence agencies for years: getting into computers that adversaries, and some American partners, have tried to make impervious to spying or cyberattack. In most cases, the radio frequency hardware must be physically inserted by a spy, a manufacturer or an unwitting user. The N.S.A. calls its efforts more an act of active defense against foreign cyberattacks than a tool to go on the offensive. But when Chinese attackers place similar software on the computer systems of American companies or government agencies, American officials have protested, often at the presidential level. Among the most frequent targets of the N.S.A. and its Pentagon partner, United States Cyber Command, have been units of the Chinese Army, which the United States has accused of launching regular digital probes and attacks on American industrial and military targets, usually to steal secrets or intellectual property. But the program, code-named Quantum, has also been successful in inserting software into Russian military networks and systems used by the Mexican police and drug cartels, trade institutions inside the European Union, and sometime partners against terrorism like Saudi Arabia, India and Pakistan, according to officials and an N.S.A. map that indicates sites of what the agency calls computer network exploitation. Whats new here is the scale and the sophistication of the intelligence agencys ability to get into computers and networks to which no one has ever had access before, said James Andrew Lewis, the cybersecurity expert at the Center for Strategic and International Studies in Washington. Some of these capabilities have been around for a while, but the combination of learning how to penetrate systems to insert software and learning how to do that using radio frequencies has given the U.S. a window its never had before. No Domestic Use Seen There is no evidence that the N.S.A. has implanted its software or used its radio frequency technology inside the United States. While refusing to comment on the scope of the Quantum program, the N.S.A. said its actions were not comparable to Chinas. N.S.A.s activities are focused and specifically deployed against and only against valid foreign intelligence targets in response to intelligence requirements, Vanee Vines, an agency spokeswoman, said in a statement. We do not use foreign intelligence capabilities to steal the trade secrets of foreign companies on behalf of or give intelligence we collect to U.S. companies to enhance their international competitiveness or increase their bottom line. Over the past two months, parts of the program have been disclosed in documents from the trove leaked by Edward J. Snowden, the former N.S.A. contractor. A Dutch newspaper published the map of areas where the United States has inserted spy software, sometimes in cooperation with local authorities, often covertly. Der Spiegel, a German newsmagazine, published the N.S.A.s catalog of hardware products that can secretly transmit and receive digital signals from computers, a program called ANT. The New York Times withheld some of those details, at the request of American intelligence officials, when it reported, in the summer of 2012, on American cyberattacks on Iran. President Obama is scheduled to announce on Friday what recommendations he is accepting from an advisory panel on changing N.S.A. practices. The panel agreed with Silicon Valley executives that some of the techniques developed by the agency to find flaws in computer systems undermine global confidence in a range of American-made information products like laptop computers and cloud services. Embracing Silicon Valleys critique of the N.S.A., the panel has recommended banning, except in extreme cases, the N.S.A. practice of exploiting flaws in common software to aid in American surveillance and cyberattacks. It also called for an end to government efforts to weaken publicly available encryption systems, and said the government should never develop secret ways into computer systems to exploit them, which sometimes include software implants. Richard A. Clarke, an official in the Clinton and Bush administrations who served as one of the five members of the advisory panel, explained the groups reasoning in an email last week, saying that it is more important that we defend ourselves than that we attack others. Holes in encryption software would be more of a risk to us than a benefit, he said, adding: If we can find the vulnerability, so can others. Its more important that we protect our power grid than that we get into Chinas. From the earliest days of the Internet, the N.S.A. had little trouble monitoring traffic because a vast majority of messages and searches were moved through servers on American soil. As the Internet expanded, so did the N.S.A.s efforts to understand its geography. A program named Treasure Map tried to identify nearly every node and corner of the web, so that any computer or mobile device that touched it could be located. A 2008 map, part of the Snowden trove, notes 20 programs to gain access to big fiber-optic cables it calls them covert, clandestine or cooperative large accesses not only in the United States but also in places like Hong Kong, Indonesia and the Middle East. The same map indicates that the United States had already conducted more than 50,000 worldwide implants, and a more recent budget document said that by the end of last year that figure would rise to about 85,000. A senior official, who spoke on the condition of anonymity, said the actual figure was most likely closer to 100,000. That map suggests how the United States was able to speed ahead with implanting malicious software on the computers around the world that it most wanted to monitor or disable before they could be used to launch a cyberattack. A Focus on Defense In interviews, officials and experts said that a vast majority of such implants are intended only for surveillance and serve as an early warning system for cyberattacks directed at the United States. How do you ensure that Cyber Command people are able to look at those that are attacking us? a senior official, who compared it to submarine warfare, asked in an interview several months ago. That is what the submarines do all the time, said the official, speaking on the condition of anonymity to describe policy. They track the adversary submarines. In cyberspace, he said, the United States tries to silently track the adversaries while theyre trying to silently track you. If tracking subs was a Cold War cat-and-mouse game with the Soviets, tracking malware is a pursuit played most aggressively with the Chinese. The United States has targeted Unit 61398, the Shanghai-based Chinese Army unit believed to be responsible for many of the biggest cyberattacks on the United States, in an effort to see attacks being prepared. With Australias help, one N.S.A. document suggests, the United States has also focused on another specific Chinese Army unit. Documents obtained by Mr. Snowden indicate that the United States has set up two data centers in China perhaps through front companies from which it can insert malware into computers. When the Chinese place surveillance software on American computer systems and they have, on systems like those at the Pentagon and at The Times the United States usually regards it as a potentially hostile act, a possible prelude to an attack. Mr. Obama laid out Americas complaints about those practices to President Xi Jinping of China in a long session at a summit meeting in California last June. At that session, Mr. Obama tried to differentiate between conducting surveillance for national security which the United States argues is legitimate and conducting it to steal intellectual property. The argument is not working, said Peter W. Singer of the Brookings Institution, a co-author of a new book called Cybersecurity and Cyberwar. To the Chinese, gaining economic advantage is part of national security. And the Snowden revelations have taken a lot of the pressure off the Chinese. Still, the United States has banned the sale of computer servers from a major Chinese manufacturer, Huawei, for fear that they could contain technology to penetrate American networks. An Old Technology The N.S.A.s efforts to reach computers unconnected to a network have relied on a century-old technology updated for modern times: radio transmissions. In a catalog produced by the agency that was part of the Snowden documents released in Europe, there are page after page of devices using technology that would have brought a smile to Q, James Bonds technology supplier. One, called Cottonmouth I, looks like a normal USB plug but has a tiny transceiver buried in it. According to the catalog, it transmits information swept from the computer through a covert channel that allows data infiltration and exfiltration. Another variant of the technology involves tiny circuit boards that can be inserted in a laptop computer either in the field or when they are shipped from manufacturers so that the computer is broadcasting to the N.S.A. even while the computers user enjoys the false confidence that being walled off from the Internet constitutes real protection. The relay station it communicates with, called Nightstand, fits in an oversize briefcase, and the system can attack a computer from as far away as eight miles under ideal environmental conditions. It can also insert packets of data in milliseconds, meaning that a false message or piece of programming can outrace a real one to a target computer. Similar stations create a link between the target computers and the N.S.A., even if the machines are isolated from the Internet. Computers are not the only targets. Dropoutjeep attacks iPhones. Other hardware and software are designed to infect large network servers, including those made by the Chinese. Most of those code names and products are now at least five years old, and they have been updated, some experts say, to make the United States less dependent on physically getting hardware into adversaries computer systems. The N.S.A. refused to talk about the documents that contained these descriptions, even after they were published in Europe. Continuous and selective publication of specific techniques and tools used by N.S.A. to pursue legitimate foreign intelligence targets is detrimental to the security of the United States and our allies, Ms. Vines, the N.S.A. spokeswoman, said. But the Iranians and others discovered some of those techniques years ago. The hardware in the N.S.A.s catalog was crucial in the cyberattacks on Irans nuclear facilities, code-named Olympic Games, that began around 2008 and proceeded through the summer of 2010, when a technical error revealed the attack software, later called Stuxnet. That was the first major test of the technology. One feature of the Stuxnet attack was that the technology the United States slipped into Irans nuclear enrichment plant at Natanz was able to map how it operated, then phone home the details. Later, that equipment was used to insert malware that blew up nearly 1,000 centrifuges, and temporarily set back Irans program. But the Stuxnet strike does not appear to be the last time the technology was used in Iran. In 2012, a unit of the Islamic Revolutionary Guards Corps moved a rock near the countrys underground Fordo nuclear enrichment plant. The rock exploded and spewed broken circuit boards that the Iranian news media described as the remains of a device capable of intercepting data from computers at the plant. The origins of that device have never been determined. On Sunday, according to the semiofficial Fars news agency, Irans Oil Ministry issued another warning about possible cyberattacks, describing a series of defenses it was erecting and making no mention of what are suspected of being its own attacks on Saudi Arabias largest oil producer. http://www.nytimes.com/2014/01/15/us/nsa-effort-pries-open-computers-not-connected-to-internet.html?partner=rss&emc=rss&smid=tw-nytimesworld
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