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  1. Author: Whitson Gordon Posted Today 7:00 AM Keep on hearing about encryption but still not sure what it involves? Heres a basic introductionto encryption, when you should use it, and how to set it up. What Is Encryption? Encryption is a method of protecting data from people you dont want to see it. For example, when you use your credit card on Amazon, your computer encrypts that information so that others cant steal your personal data as it is being transferred. Similarly, if you have a file on your computer you want to keep secret only for yourself, you can encrypt it so that no one can open that file without the password. Its useful for everything from sending sensitive information to securing your email, keeping your cloud storage safe, and even hiding your entire operating system. Encryption, at its core, is similar to those decoder rings you played with when you were younger. You have a message, you encode it using a secret cipher, and only other people with the cipher can read it. Anyone else just sees gibberish. Obviously, this is an incredibly simplified explanation. The encryption in your computer is far more complex and there are different types of encryption that use multiple decoder rings but thats the basic idea. There are also different levels of security when it comes to encryption. Some types, for example, are more secure but take longer to decode. Few, if any, encryption methods are 100 per cent foolproof. If you want a more detailed explainer on how encryption works, check out this article from the How-To Geek and this article from HowStuffWorks. They explain a few different kinds of encryption and how they keep you safe online. Should I Encrypt My Files? The short answer: yes. Things can be stolen even if you dont share your computer. All someone needs is a few minutes in front of the keyboard to retrieve anything they want. A login password wont protect you, either breaking into a password-protected computer is insanely easy. So should you encrypt your sensitive files? Yes. But theres a bit more to it than that. You have two big choices when it comes to encryption: do you just encrypt the important files , or do you encrypt your entire drive? Each has pros and cons: ◾ Encrypting a select group of files such as the ones that contain personal information keeps them safe without any extra complications. However, if someone had access to your computer, they could still break into it and view any non-encrypted files, access your browser, install malware, and so on. ◾ Encrypting your entire drive makes it difficult for anyone to access any of your data or even boot up your computer without your password. However, if you experience any corruption on your drive, its much less likely that youll be able to retrieve that data. We generally recommend against average users encrypting their entire drive. Unless you have sensitive files all over your computer, or have other reasons for encrypting the entire thing, its easier to encrypt the sensitive files and call it a day. Full disk encryption is more secure, but can also much more problematic if you dont put in the work to keep everything backed up safely (and then encrypt those backups as well). That said, well show you how to do both in this guide. Well talk a bit more about each situation in their individual sections below. How To Encrypt Individual Files Or Folders With TrueCrypt If you need to keep just a few files safe from prying eyes, you can encrypt them with the free, open-source, cross-platform TrueCrypt. These steps should work on Windows, Mac and Linux. Note that if youre encrypting files to send them over the internet, you can also use this previously mentioned 7-Zip method. Creating a TrueCrypt volume for your files is very easy just follow TrueCrypts step-by-step wizard. Heres an overview of what it entails: 1. Start TrueCrypt and click the Create Volume button. 2. On the first screen of the wizard, select Create an encrypted file container. 3. On the next screen, choose Standard TrueCrypt Volume. If you want to create a hidden volume (to further obscure your data), read more about how it works here. We wont cover it in this tutorial. 4. On the Volume Location screen, click the Select File button and navigate to the folder in which you want to store your encrypted files. Do not select an existing file as this will delete it instead, navigate to the folder, type the desired name of your encrypted volume in the File Name box, and click Save. Well add files to this TrueCrypt volume later. 5. Choose your encryption algorithm on the next screen. AES should be fine for most users 6. Choose the size of your volume. Make sure it has enough space to fit all your files, and any files you may want to add to it later. 7. Choose a password to protect your files. Remember, the stronger your password, the safer your files will be. Make sure you remember your password, because if you lose it, your data will be inaccessible. 8. On the next screen, follow the instructions and move your mouse around randomly for a bit. This will ensure TrueCrypt generates a strong, random key. Then click Next to continue with the wizard. 9. Choose a filesystem for your encrypted volume. If youre storing files over 4GB inside, youll need to choose NTFS. Click Format to create the volume. To mount your volume, open up TrueCrypt and click the Select File button. Navigate to the file you just created. Then, select an open drive letter from the list and click the Mount button. Type in your password when prompted, and when youre done, your encrypted volume should show up in Windows Explorer, as if it were a separate drive. You can drag files to it, move them around, or delete them just like you would any other folder. When youre done working with it, just head back into TrueCrypt, select it from the list, and click Dismount. Your files should stay safely hidden away. How To Encrypt Your Entire Hard Drive On Windows With TrueCrypt The process of encrypting your entire hard drive isnt that different from encrypting individual files and folders (though TrueCrypt can only do this in Windows). Once again, the process is quite simple thanks to TrueCrypts step-by-step wizard. Heres what you need to do: 1. Start TrueCrypt and click the Create Volume button. 2. On the first screen of the wizard, select Encrypt the System Partition or Entire System Drive. 3. On the next screen, choose Normal. If you want to create a hidden operating system (to further obscure your data), read more about how it works here. We wont cover it in this tutorial. 4. Next, choose Encrypt the Whole Drive. This should work for most people, though if you have other partitions on your drive that you dont want encrypted, you may want to choose the first option instead. 5. When asked to encrypt the Host Protected Area, we recommend choosing No, unless you have a specific reason to do this. 6. If you only have one operating system installed on your computer, choose Single-Boot at this next prompt. If you arent sure, youre probably using a single-boot setup. If youre dual booting (say, with Linux or another version of Windows), choose Multi-Boot. 7. Choose your encryption algorithm on the next screen. AES should be fine for most users. 8. Choose a password to protect your files. Remember, the stronger your password, the safer your files will be. Make sure you remember your password, because if you lose it, your computer will be unbootable and your data will be lost. 9. On the next screen, follow the instructions and move your mouse around randomly for a bit. This will ensure TrueCrypt generates a strong, random key. Then click Next to continue with the wizard. 10. Next, select a location for a TrueCrypt Rescue Disk, which will help you save your data if the bootloader, master key, or other important data gets corrupted. Give it a file name and save it. 11. Once youve saved the file (in ISO format), youll have the option to burn it to a CD or DVD. Do this now (using either Windows built-in tools or a program like ImgBurn) before you continue. Click Next when youve finished burning the disc (and keep the disc in a safe place!). 12. Choose a Wipe Mode for your data. None is the fastest, but if you want to ensure that your data is as secure as possible, choose one of the other options (3- or 7-pass is probably fine). 13. Run the System Encryption Pretest on the next screen. Youll need to restart your computer and enter your new TrueCrypt password when prompted. 14. If the test runs successfully, youll see the option to begin encrypting your drive. Let it run it will probably take a while (especially if you have a large drive). Thats it. From now on, when you start up your computer, youll need to enter your TrueCrypt password before you boot into Windows. Make sure you dont forget your password or lose that recovery disc if you do and something goes wrong, you wont be able to boot into your computer and youll lose all your data. How To Encrypt Your Entire Hard Drive On OS X With FileVault OS X has a built-in encryption tool called FileVault, and its incredibly easy to set up. All you need to do is: 1. Head to System Preferences > Security & Privacy > FileVault. 2. Click the lock in the bottom left-hand corner of the window to make changes. Type in your password when prompted. 3. Click the Turn on FileVault button. Copy down your recovery key and store it in a safe place (preferably not on your computer somewhere physically secure like a safe). We dont recommend storing it with Apple. 4. Restart your computer when prompted. When you boot back up, OS X will begin encrypting your disk, and your computer will probably run a little slowly while it goes. It could take an hour or more, depending on how big your hard drive is. Alternative Tools TrueCrypt has long been one of the most popular encryption tools out there, and its one of the easiest to set up. It isnt the only option, however. As we mentioned earlier, 7-Zip is also a great way to encrypt your files, as is BitLocker, which comes with the Pro version of Windows 8 (or the Enterprise and Ultimate versions of Windows 7). Check out our Hive Five on encryption tools for a comparison of some of the more popular alternatives if you want to try them out. Final Words As we mentioned at the beginning, encryption is not 100 per cent foolproof, but its better than leaving your files out in the open. Remember what encryption cant do it cant secure your drive if its infected with malware, if you leave it turned on in public spaces, or if youre using a weak password. Even if you put your computer to sleep, its possible an experienced hacker could recover sensitive data from your computers RAM. Dont let encryption lure you into a false sense of security: its just one layer of the security process. Lastly, remember that this is just a beginners guide to what encryption is and how it works. Theres a lot more beyond basic encryption of files and folders, like transferring encrypted data to your friends, securing your email with PGP, encrypting your Dropbox, or creating a decoy operating system to further obscure your information. Now that you know the very basics, dont be afraid to branch out and learn more about encryption and what you can do to secure your data. Good luck! Author: Whitson Gordon Posted Today 7:00 AM Source
  2. At this point in the game, SSD optimization is nothing new to technology and has become a very popular topic as a result of SSD popularity, coupled with Microsoft’s shutting down sales of Windows 7. Microsoft wants the world to be a Windows 8 world, at least until Windows Blue arrives as originally discovered in our own Forum Community. Even more amusing is the fact that SSDs require no optimization whatsoever but they seem to be, well, like a new car that one has to keep clean. We can’t resist learning each and ever characteristic and then fine tuning it until it purrs. The SSD industry (and Microsoft) has made a definite step ahead in the incorporation of many important SSD optimizations in order to smooth the worlds transition from the dreaded hard drive to solid state. Many of these optimizations go against the grain of most’s thinking, however through the past few years, we have seen just about every one that we recommended in 2010 accepted. Back then, they told us we were losing our mind and a person would be nuts to follow our lead. The SSD Optimization Guide Windows 8 Edition is our third in our series of such guides, the first published close to three years ago to the day which was redesigned last year. A comparison of ‘yesterday’s and today’s’ will show many similarities, this because the engine at the heart of Windows 8 is still much the same as it was in Windows 7. It is the fine tuning of Window’s 8 that make this guide so special. Our goal hasn’t changed as well. We hope to provide you with as much as an understanding of each optimization, as well as helping you to weigh the pros and cons of making your final decision to complete that tweak. IS YOUR COMPUTER SATA 2 OR SATA 3? If you are upgrading to an SSD in your own system, it is important to understand whether your desktop (or portable) computer is SATA 2 or SATA 3 as this strikes directly to system performance. With the introduction of solid state drives, the technology sector realized that faster disk access times and transfer speeds made possible a very visible performance increase in computers. A traditional computer is SATA 2 and capable of transfer performance up to roughly 275MB/s read and write speeds while newer SATA 3 solutions are capable of over 500MB/s read and write performance, almost double the speed. Did you know that SATA 2 and 3 actually refers only to the interface that you plug your systems data cable in to? SATA = Serial ATA = Serial Advanced Technology Attachment The good news is that all SATA 3 SSDs are fully backward compatible to SATA 2, however, understanding the difference can save you days of frustration wondering why your SATA 2 PC is not hitting manufacturer listed performance of 500MB/s transfer. Do you want to know a secret? For a typical user, the difference is moot as they will probably never be able to visibly observe a difference between SATA 2 and SATA 3. The difference between a hard drive and an SSD, on the other hand, is absolutely amazing! It is an entirely new experience for most. IS IT A SSD, HYBRID SYSTEM, CACHED SSD OR HYBRID SSD First up on our list is our choice of storage medium. A hybrid SSD is a hard drive with contained flash modules that claim to increase performance to that hard drive. Unless your performance is limited only to start times, we don’t feel this a viable consideration. A cached SSD, on the other hand, is a solid state drive that may be purchased with a user installed caching program. The most popular caching program that we have seen and tested to date is Samsung’s own NVELO Dataplex Caching Software. NVELO Dataplex caching software increases the speed of your hard drive to that of the SSD through caching of ‘hot’ or frequently used data. This data includes all OS functions and the start process which increases your hard drive speed significantly. Manufacturers such as Crucial, OCZ, Mushkin and Corsair have jumped aboard the NVELO train and provide solutions in sizes ranging from 30 to 128GB, capacity being the key element in disk caching that hasn’t been realized in hybrid hard drive solutions to date. Although we are SSD through and through here at TSSDR, we have very positive support for any NVELO Dataplex caching solution and, if this seems the way to go, check out product availability at Amazon. NVELO Dataplex is the ONLY caching solution that can make cached hard drive transfer performance of 550MB/s read and 510MB/s write with up to 80,000 IOPS a reality. Not get too confusing but a hybrid laptop may be a laptop with an SSD and caching solution, as we recently tested with the new Sony VAIO T14 Touch Ultrabook where a 32GB ‘SandForce Driven’ SSD was used with Condusiv ExpressCache. Our solid recommendation is always an SSD (or SSD with hard drive for data) and the SSD Optimization Guide is only of value to systems that use an SSD as their primary drive and their operating system and/or software and data is installed. For those that have to have that capacity, we will get to a trick for moving your ‘Documents’ folder off of the SSD and on to the hard drive. CAN WINDOWS 7 USERS BENEFIT AS WELL? In a word…yes. Much of what we are going to describe is the same in Windows 7 as it is in Windows 8, given exception to the route we follow or a few changes here and there. We have added some significant performance enhancements that both Windows 7 and 8 users can try to significantly increase the speed of their system. It is important that readers follow our direction exactly, and regardless, any changes you make to your own system is of your own choice and we are not responsible IN ANY WAY for unexpected results that may occur. Read More... Additional Reading Materials BENEFITS OF A SOLID STATE DRIVE SSD COMPONENTS AND MAKE UP SSD TYPES AND FORM FACTORS SSD ADVERTISED PERFORMANCE GC AND TRIM IN SSDS EXPLAINED
  3. By Paul Sawers, Yesterday Windows Phone is making small strides in some markets as it looks to dent the dominance of Android and iOS. But yes, it does have some way to go before it can lay-claim to any smartphone throne. Recent figures suggest Windows Phone 7 and 8 constitute more than 10% of UK smartphone sales, while across other major European markets Windows Phone 8 represents around 1 in 10 of all smartphone sales. Some data even suggests it overtook iOS in Italy between July and September. With BlackBerry on its way out of the consumer market, Windows Phone is currently the only real contender for iOS and Android, but its market share is still dwarfed by the big guns. Indeed, there’s every chance that you’ve never seen one in the flesh, let alone used one. So for those looking to break from the mold, here’s a quick guide for Windows Phone noobs. And it starts with a quick history lesson. A potted history of Windows Phone Any history of Windows Phone has to include its preceding incarnation – Windows Mobile – which launched initially on the Pocket PC 2000, in April 2000. Though it wasn’t officially referred to as Windows Mobile until 2003. The early devices that sported the fledgling operating system could be regarded as a successor to Microsoft’s Palm-Size PC, which too was based on the Windows CE operating system, and started shipping from around the mid-90s. All these early devices were geared more towards the enterprise rather than consumer market. The Windows Mobile brand remained all the way through to version 6 in 2007, including all the subsequent iterations up to 6.5.5 in 2010, by which point iOS and Android were already taking the consumer markets by storm. Windows Phone 7 was announced at Mobile World Congress (MWC) in February 2010, and was released to the public in November that year. Though the version numbering continued where Windows Mobile left off, it was for all intents and purposes a different platform. The Windows Marketplace for Mobile, an App Store-like conduit for third-party Windows Mobile apps, opened in October 2009 – just a few months before Windows Phone was announced. But it was closed down for good in July 2011, making way for the Windows Phone Marketplace – subsequently rebranded as the Windows Phone Store in August 2012 – which had launched alongside Windows Phone 7. The last major launch for Windows Phone was in October 2012, when the curtain was drawn back on Windows Phone 8. The new system saw the existing Windows CE-based architecture replaced with a Windows NT kernel, similar to that of its desktop counterpart, Windows 8. This allowed apps to be more easily ported between the two, as well as catering for larger screens, multi-core processors and other enhancements such as NFC. But it also meant that those who’d committed their cash to Windows Phone 7 couldn’t upgrade their OS to Windows Phone 8. Though Windows Phone 7 isn’t yet dead, the future of Windows Phone very much lies in version 8 and up, with the next big update rumored for a 2014 launch. But as with other mobile operating systems, particularly Android, the hardware is every bit as important – if not more so – than the software. So getting the best manufacturers on board is vital. Devices: The state of play It would be something of an understatement to say that Nokia has played a huge role in the growth of Windows Phone. The Finnish mobile giant first committed its future to the platform in early 2011, and by November 2013 the company was said to control around 90% of the Windows Phone market. Indeed, its Lumia brand has become almost synonymous with the operating system. Here’s a full list of Nokia Lumia Windows Phone handsets, with the date of release in brackets (month/year). Nokia Lumia 810 (12/11), Lumia 820 (12/11), Lumia 822 (12/11), Lumia 920 (12/11), Lumia 620 (1/13), Lumia 520/521 (3/13), Lumia 720 (3/13), Lumia 928 (5/13), Lumia 925 (6/13), Lumia 1020 (7/13), Lumia 625 (8/13), Lumia 1520 (11/13) Lumia 525 (12/13), and the Lumia 1320 (12/13). While Nokia does have the lion’s share of the Windows Phone 8 market, there is also the HTC 8X (11/12), HTC 8S (12/12), Samsung ATIV S (12/12), Huawei Ascend W1 (01/13), Samsung ATIV Odyssey (01/13), HTC 8XT (07/13), Huawei Ascend W2 (08/13) and the Samsung ATIV S Neo (08/13). There hasn’t been a new non-Nokia consumer Windows Phone device since Microsoft announced its intentions to acquire Nokia’s Devices and Services Division last September, and it’s not clear yet whether we will see any more. Few people question the quality of the Windows Phone 8-hosting devices – Nokia’s flagship Lumia handsets are solid and beautiful, offering arguably the best camera functionality of any smartphone. We even called the Lumia 1020 a camera that makes calls. But according to some, hardware is nothing without native apps – something that Windows Phone has been slow to attract, in terms of the big-name brands at least. Apps: What there is and what there ain’t I’ve previously argued that Windows Phone’s big problem isn’t a lack of apps. The main issue is influencers and opinion-formers perpetuating a myth that native apps are pivotal to a mobile platform, which filters down through to those looking to buy a shiny new smartphone. Except many, if not most, of the consumer market would get by absolutely fine with a good browser, Facebook, Twitter, Spotify, Instagram, Angry Birds and maybe a few others. That all said, Microsoft has been working to get all the major apps on-side, and there was a big push in the build up to Christmas, with Instagram, Vine, Waze and Mint.com, to name just a few, all launching on the platform. Then there’s Angry Birds Go, Skype, Twitter, WhatsApp, Amazon Mobile, Path, Amazon Kindle, TuneIn Radio, Shazam, Spotify, Netflix, Evernote, PayPal, LinkedIn, Tumblr, WordPress, Foursquare, Runtastic, Endomondo and Google Search. But launching an app doesn’t mean that it’s frequently updated, and many of them are behind their iOS and Android counterparts in terms of features – some look like they’ve just been cobbled together as an after-thought – such as eBay. And Amazon-owned IMDb hasn’t been touched in 18 months. The ‘official’ Facebook app was actually developed by Microsoft itself given that the social networking behemoth evidently doesn’t view the platform as viable, when there’s a perfectly good mobile browser to use. And YouTube? This is another annoying one, given it too arrived on the scene via Microsoft’s own developers, but due to a series of squabbles involving a violation of terms and conditions, Google blocked access to the app for a while. As of October, Microsoft reverted the YouTube Windows Phone app to its former state – which is basically a shortcut to a mobile Web version of the service. There’s some notable omissions from the Windows Phone Store though – there’s no Google Maps, but there is the home-grown Maps and Here Maps; and while there’s no official Gmail app, there is a decent third-party effort. There’s also no Flipboard, Dropbox, SoundCloud, Yahoo Mail, Airbnb, Snapchat, Uber, Hailo, Wikipedia, Pinterest, Pocket or Any.do, to name just a handful. You can check out our full guide to the state-of-play with Windows Phone apps here, but as noted already, many folk will get by with a handful of the well-known apps and a good browser – thus the existing omissions from the Windows Phone Store likely won’t concern you. Interface You’re probably used to this sight – rows-upon-rows of square icons, strewn across multiple screens on your device. On Android, when you download an app it’s added to your main library with a shortcut added to your homescreen. You can delete it from your homescreen but still have the app on the device, which can be useful for those ones you don’t use very often. When you install an app on iOS, it’s automatically added to your homescreen, with no separate repository for storing them locally. On both iOS and Android, you can create theme-specific folders on your homescreen to store related applications, such as ‘News’, ‘Sport’ and ‘Reading’. The Windows Phone 8 interface deviates from this, and does actually offer a refreshing alternative. To help demonstrate this, we’re using a Nokia Lumia 925. It sports what are known as Live Tiles, which are basically shortcuts to apps, features, contacts, websites and other media items. These can be dragged and rearranged, or removed completely. But what sets these apart are that they’re dynamic, displaying information that changes in real-time. This could include a new email, photo or – as you can see below – statistics from a run on Runtastic. Pulling in from the right reveals the main library of apps and settings, with a long-press giving the option to pin to your main homescreen. It’s here where all your new app and game downloads will be installed by default too. To remove an item from the main screen, long-press it, and you’ll be given an option to unpin it, or make it smaller. The Windows Phone Store is familiar and works in a similar way to Google Play and the App Store – you can browse by categories or search by keywords, and it will be downloaded to your phone when you give it the go-ahead. In terms of navigation, Windows Phone 8 devices are generally more similar to Android than iOS, insofar as you have a back button, which takes you back to the previous screen, and a home button which takes you to the main start screen. But it also sports a baked-in search button, giving direct access to the world of Bing. These are the very basics of Windows Phone 8, but if you want to take things further, it does actually offer up quite a few ‘Easter Eggs’, if you’re willing to put in the time to discover them. For example, by hitting the search button (magnifying glass), you can bring up the scanner (eye) which lets you beam barcodes, QR codes, and more. But interestingly, this also lets you translate text using the device’s built-in camera – it works for 39 different languages. The little music icon next to the eye serves as a shortcut to a Shazam-style music recognition service. The more you use Windows Phone, the more you’ll discover little gems too, such as the ability to respond to a call with a text message mid-ring. Rather than answering, you slide up on the call, and hit the ‘text reply’ button. You can choose from a default message (e.g. “I’ll call later”), or construct one yourself. I’ve been using Windows Phone for the past month or so – not as my main device, but as a supplementary device when I’m out and about, and at home. It does take a little getting used to, but I’ve really grown to like it. The main downside from my perspective is the lack of deep-integration with Google services, which I’ve grown to rely on in recent times. HERE Maps is great, but it’s not Google Maps. And the native Gmail app for Android is badly missed too, as is YouTube. There are shortcuts and ways around this, which will work fine for many people, but for me it’s probably a deal-killer for now. But hopefully there’s enough information in here to give you a good grounding on where Windows Phone has come from, and where it’s at just now. There’s likely to be a lot more coming from Microsoft and Nokia when the acquisition is sealed later this year, so it’ll be interesting to see where things go with Windows Phone 9 and beyond. http://thenextweb.com/mobile/2014/01/24/everything-need-know-windows-phone/#!tjEEQ
  4. Tint Guide Software Pack DC 18.05.2014 + Portable Picture editing software from Tint Guide: collage, photomontage, smart image resize and object removal, virtual makeup and virtual cosmetic. Our Picture Editing Software: include animated picture editing samples;can be used as plug-ins in Adobe Photoshop and compatible photo editing programs;have scanner (camera) twain support;run on Windows XP / Vista / 7 / 8, both 32-bit and 64-bit.18 May 2014 Beauty Guide 2.1.9Brightness Guide 2.2.2Cosmetic Guide 2.1.9Image Resize Guide 2.1.9Makeup Guide 2.1.9Pet Eye Fix Guide 2.1.9Photo Montage Guide 2.1.9Picture Cutout Guide 3.1.9Website: http://tintguide.com OS: Windows XP / Vista / 7 / 8 Language: ML Medicine: Patch Size: 36,10 / 58,87 Mb.
  5. Tint Guide Software Pack DC 02.06.2014 Picture editing software from Tint Guide: collage, photomontage, smart image resize and object removal, virtual makeup and virtual cosmetic. Our Picture Editing Software: include animated picture editing samples;can be used as plug-ins in Adobe Photoshop and compatible photo editing programs;have scanner (camera) twain support;run on Windows XP / Vista / 7 / 8, both 32-bit and 64-bit.Tint Guide Software Pack DC 02.06.2014 Beauty Guide 2.2.1Brightness Guide 2.3.1Cosmetic Guide 2.2.1Image Resize Guide 2.2.1Makeup Guide 2.2.1Pet Eye Fix Guide 2.2.1Photo Montage Guide 2.2.2Picture Cutout Guide 3.2.2Website: http://tintguide.com OS: Windows XP / Vista / 7 / 8 Language: ML Medicine: Patch Size: 36,21 Mb.
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    Brightness Guide 2.2.1

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  9. selesn777

    Image Resize Guide 2.1.8

    Image Resize Guide 2.1.8 Image Resize Guide is a program that allows you to change the size or aspect ratio of an image keeping the "important" features intact and remove objects from photo without visible traces. This program offers the following tools: Resize - allows you to change the image size.Crop - allows you to cut out an area of an image.Smart Remove - removes objects without visible traces.Smart Size - changes the image size removing "unnecessary" portions while keeping the "important" features intact.Smart Patch - allows to apply a patch from one area of an image to another.Website: http://tintguide.com/ OS: Windows XP / Vista / 7 / 8 Language: ML Medicine: Patch Size: 4,87 Mb.
  10. Picture Cutout Guide 3.2.3 + Portable Program offers these tools: Wide Edge - allows you to separate an object from its background and to store it for later transfer to another photo; applies background effects; Paste Object - pastes a separated image into another photo. Picture Cutout Guide includes animated demo samples: the program features; indication the object boundary; simple background erase; the background effects; complex background erase; photomontage. Features Website: http://tintguide.com OS: Windows XP / Vista / 7 / 8 Language: ML Medicine: Patch Size: 4,36 / 4,32 Mb.
  11. selesn777

    Image Resize Guide 2.2.2

    Image Resize Guide 2.2.2 Image Resize Guide is a program that allows you to change the size or aspect ratio of an image keeping the "important" features intact and remove objects from photo without visible traces. This program offers the following tools: Resize - allows you to change the image size.Crop - allows you to cut out an area of an image.Smart Remove - removes objects without visible traces.Smart Size - changes the image size removing "unnecessary" portions while keeping the "important" features intact.Smart Patch - allows to apply a patch from one area of an image to another.Website: http://tintguide.com/ OS: Windows XP / Vista / 7 / 8 Language: ML Medicine: Patch Size: 4,82 Mb.
  12. Photo Montage Guide 2.2.3 + Portable Photo Montage Guide - separates solid objects from an arbitrary background, applies background effects (filling, shadowing, blur, monochrome), allows transferring objects to another photo, makes a photomontage, allows you to change the size or aspect ratio of an image keeping the "important" features intact and remove objects from photo without visible traces. This program offers the following tools: Resize - allows you to change the image size.Crop - allows you to cut out an area of an image.Text - designed for inscribing images.Separation - allows you to separate an object from its background and to store it for later transfer to another photo; applies background effects.Paste Object - pastes a separated image into another photo.Smart Remove - removes objects without visible traces.Smart Size - changes the image size removing "unnecessary" portions while keeping the "important" features intact.Smart Patch - allows to apply a patch from one area of an image to another.Website: http://tintguide.com OS: Windows XP / Vista / 7 / 8 Language: ML Medicine: Patch Size: 5,20 / 5,17 Mb.
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