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  1. Warning it's a fairly long read..But very interesting i think.. Security experts call it a “drive-by download”: a hacker infiltrates a high-traffic website and then subverts it to deliver malware to every single visitor. It’s one of the most powerful tools in the black hat arsenal, capable of delivering thousands of fresh victims into a hackers’ clutches within minutes. Now the technique is being adopted by a different kind of a hacker—the kind with a badge. For the last two years, the FBI has been quietly experimenting with drive-by hacks as a solution to one of law enforcement’s knottie
  2. Government communication obtained through a Freedom of Information inquiry reveals that several people have asked the authorities to shut down The Pirate Bay. The requests were originally sent to the FBI, who were also contacted by a mother looking for advice on how to deal with the pirating father of her son. There is no doubt that copyright holders repeatedly press the authorities to take action against The Pirate Bay. So, when a Pirate Bay-related Freedom of Information request was sent to Homeland Security’s National Intellectual Property Rights Coordination Center, we expected to see l
  3. James Duane explains in practical terms why citizens should never talk to police under any circumstances. James Duane is an American law professor at the Regent University School of Law, former criminal defense attorney, and Fifth Amendment expert. He received some viral online attention for his "Don't Talk To Police" video of a lecture he gave to a group of law students with Virginia Beach Police Department Officer George Bruch. Using former Supreme Court Justice Robert Jackson as support of his "Don't Talk to Police" advice, Duane says, inter alia, that: even perfectly innocent citizens m
  4. Tor is still DHE 1024 (NSA crackable) After more revelations, and expert analysis, we still aren't precisely sure what crypto the NSA can break. But everyone seems to agree that if anything, the NSA can break 1024 RSA/DH keys. Assuming no "breakthroughs", the NSA can spend $1 billion on custom chips that can break such a key in a few hours. We know the NSA builds custom chips, they've got fairly public deals with IBM foundries to build chips. The problem with Tor is that it still uses these 1024 bit keys for much of its crypto, particularly because most people are still using older versions o
  5. By Kevin Poulsen 01.27.14 6:30 AM While investigating a hosting company known for sheltering child porn last year the FBI incidentally seized the entire e-mail database of a popular anonymous webmail service called TorMail. Now the FBI is tapping that vast trove of e-mail in unrelated investigations. The bureau’s data windfall, seized from a company called Freedom Hosting, surfaced in court papers last week when prosecutors indicted a Florida man for allegedly selling counterfeit credit cards online. The filings show the FBI built its case in part by executing a search warrant on a Gmail ac
  6. Three men have been arrested by the FBI for identifying vulnerabilities and network weak points to illegally access computer systems at Microsoft, as well as video game developers Valve Corporation, Activision Blizzard, Zombie Studios, and Epic Games. The hackers were able to illegally obtain copies of various games that were still in development - games like Gears of War 3 and Call of Duty Modern Warfare 3. The incidents began around January of 2011 and continued for two years, but the 54-page federal indictment was only revealed by The Smoking Gun today. The men are Nathan Leroux (19 years o
  7. New documents released by the FBI show that the Bureau is well on its way toward its goal of a fully operational face recognition database by this summer. EFF received these records in response to our Freedom of Information Act lawsuit for information on Next Generation Identification (NGI)—the FBI's massive biometric database that may hold records on as much as one third of the U.S. population. The facial recognition component of this database poses real threats to privacy for all Americans. What is NGI? NGI builds on the FBI's legacy fingerprint database—which already contains well over 10
  8. Getting busted by the FBI can hardly be a pleasurable experience but for one former Android software pirate his debt to the authorities won't be over anytime soon. As part of a plea agreement with the Department of Justice, a former member of the SnappzMarket group has just agreed to work undercover for the FBI. In 2012, three Android-focused websites were seized by the Department of Justice. With help from French and Dutch police, the FBI took over applanet.net, appbucket.net and snappzmarket.com, a trio of so-called ‘rogue’ app stores. Carrying out several arrests the authorities heralded
  9. The homepage of DarkMarket, a prototype for a decentralized online black market. The Silk Road, for all its clever uses of security protections like Tor and Bitcoin to protect the site’s lucrative drug trade, still offered its enemies a single point of failure. When the FBI seized the server that hosted the market in October and arrested its alleged owner Ross Ulbricht, the billion-dollar drug bazaar came crashing down. If one group of Bitcoin black market enthusiasts has their way, the next online free-trade zone could be a much more elusive target. At a Toronto Bitcoin hackathon earlier th
  10. A hacker who became an informant for the FBI directed hundreds of cyber attacks against the websites of foreign governments, including Brazil, Iran, Pakistan, Syria and Turkey, the New York Times reported Thursday. It was unclear whether the FBI explicitly ordered the digital attacks, but court documents and interviews suggest "that the government may have used hackers to gather intelligence overseas," the Times wrote. The figure at the center of the case is Hector Xavier Monsegur, who had become a prominent hacker with the activist group Anonymous, which has staged cyber assaults on MasterC
  11. The FBI officers have arrested a 20-year-old Tennessee man and charged with federal computer hacking for allegedly conspiring to launch cyber attacks on five organizations in 2013, including two universities and three companies in the US and Canada, federal law enforcement officials announced today. The accused named Timothy Justin French, who go online by the name “Orbit,” is a key member of the collective “NullCrew” hacking group, that claimed responsibility for dozens of high-profile computer attacks against corporations, educational institutions, and government agencies. NullCrew is a hac
  12. Law enforcement agencies in Europe and the United States, including Europol and the FBI, ran a coordinated takedown of the GameOver Zeus botnet on Friday, seizing servers and disrupting the botnet’s operation. Authorities say that the same botnet has been used to distribute the CryptoLocker ransomware and they’re now looking for a 30-year-old Russian whom they say is connected to the operation of the botnet. GameOver is a separate strain of malware from the more well-known Zeus Trojan and the botnet built using GameOver has proven to be a hard target for researchers and law enforcement. The G
  13. Kim Dotcom has lost his bid to have evidence held by the FBI against him kept a secret. The information , a 200-page document which includes a sampling of 22 million emails relevant to his extradition case, may now be made public. Efforts by Dotcom to gain access to government held documentation against him was also rejected. In 2012 following the raid on his New Zealand mansion, Kim Dotcom fought to gain access to the information being held against him by the FBI. A ruling by District Court Judge David Harvey in May of that year, which stood despite an August appeal, ordered disclosure of
  14. The FBI is gearing up for a major crackdown on cybercrime, and says that arrests of major criminals will follow in weeks. Speaking at the Reuters Cybersecurity Summit, the FBI’s executive assistant director of cyber enforcement Robert Anderson said, “There is a philosophy change. If you are going to attack Americans, we are going to hold you responsible.” Anderson’s speech said that the FBI’s dealings with cybercrime would now show “a much more offensive side,” and made it clear that this involved extraditions, referring to a foreign national detained at an airport in Spain for running a botne
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