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  1. A 12 year old boy has pleaded guilty to three counts of hacking in a Canadian court on Thursday. The fifth grader, who was 11 at the time of the offences, aided Anonymous in DDOS attacks against government sites during the 2012 Quebec student protests. The boy contributed to the crashing of sites and acquired user and administrator information from database servers. He is also accused of defacing the front page of websites. The Toronto Sun reports one of the hacked sites was down for two days, causing over $60,000 in damage. A report is expected to detail the extent of the attacks on targets such as Montreal Police and the Chilean government next month. It is reported hackivist group Anonymous exchanged his hacking skills for video games. "It's easy to hack but do not go there too much, they will track you down," the Primary school student said. The 12 year old was among the several hackers arrested over the Anonymous protest. His lawyer says he saw it as a challenge and that “there was no political purpose.” The fifth grader is to be sentenced next month. source: neowin
  2. By Steven Musil February 4, 2014 10:30 PM PST Unit of the U.K.'s communications intelligence agency used the cyberattack method against hacktivist groups, according to documents supplied to NBC news by Edward Snowden. A British spy unit turned a cyber attack method favored by Anonymous against it and other hacktivist groups, according to an NBC report based on documents removed from the NSA by Edward Snowden. A division of the Government Communications Headquarters (GCHQ), the U.K.'s communications intelligence agency, used distributed-denial-of-service attacks to disrupt communications among members of Anonymous, according to the documents. DDoS is the same cyberattack technique used by the hacktivist group to mount online attacks targeting financial institutions, trade groups, and government entities after PayPal and banks refused to process payments for WikiLeaks. Dubbed Rolling Thunder by the GCHQ unit, known as the Joint Threat Research Intelligence Group, or JTRIG, the attack succeeded in reducing the number of users in Anonymous cat rooms by 80 percent, according to the documents. The NBC report, which was co-authored by Glenn Greenwald, the journalist who published the first NSA stories based on documents obtained by Snowden, indicates that this is the first time the existence of the JTRIG has been revealed. The unit's infiltration of IRC chat rooms helped identify hackers who had stolen confidential information from Web sites and sent one person to prison for the theft of data from PayPal, according to the documents. The attack on PayPal was part of "Operation Payback," an anti-copyright campaign that began after the 2010 shutdown of The Pirate Bay, a Swedish torrent-tracking site. In retaliation, the group allegedly launched DDoS attacks against the Motion Picture Association of America, the Recording Industry Association of America, and the U.S. Copyright Office. The campaign was later extended to Bank of America and credit card companies such as Visa and MasterCard for their refusal to process WikiLeaks payments. According to the documents, among the techniques employed by TRIG in response were attacks on computer networks, disruption, "Active Covert Internet Operations," and "Covert Technical Operations." The documents, from a PowerPoint presentation prepared for a 2012 NSA conference called SIGDEV, detail how agents engaged hactivists by posing as fellow hackers, resulting in one instance in the conviction of a British hacker named Edward Pearson for the theft of 8 million identities from PayPal accounts. The documents list Anonymous, LulzSec, and the Syrian Cyber Army as hactivist groups that use DDoS attacks against government agencies and corporations. GCHQ did not immediately respond to a CNET request for comment but told NBC News that the agency operated within the boundaries of British law. "All of GCHQ's work is carried out in accordance with a strict legal and policy framework, which ensure that our activities are authorized, necessary and proportionate, and that there is rigorous oversight, including from the Secretary of State, the Interception and Intelligence Services Commissioners and the Parliamentary Intelligence and Security Committee," the agency's statement said. "All of our operational processes rigorously support this position." http://news.cnet.com/8301-13578_3-57618376-38/british-spy-unit-reportedly-hit-anonymous-with-ddos-attacks
  3. We are living in an era of Mass Surveillance, conducted by the Government Agencies like the NSA and GCHQ, and we ourselves gave them an open invitation as we all have sensors in our pockets that track us everywhere we go i.e. Smartphone. Encryption and security are more important today than any other time in our history. So, the best proactive way to keep your tracks clear is - Always use only trusted privacy tools and services. The same folks behind the Anonymity Tool, Tor Browser Bundle is currently working on a new Privacy tool called 'Tor Instant Messaging Bundle' (TIMB), that will help you with encrypted communication to keep your online conversations private. The Tor is the free software that lets users browse the Internet anonymously and mostly used by activists, journalists and to conceal their online activities from prying eyes. Tor Instant Messaging Bundle, or TIMB is a real time anonymous chat system, that will simply route all of your chat data through the Tor's encrypted network, which uses proxy servers to hide the identities of its users, according to the documents posted from the Tor Project's 2014 Winter Dev Meeting. The client itself will be built on top of Instantbird, an open source instant messaging service. The Tor Instant Messaging Bundle will encrypt user messages multiple times, including destination IP, making it sufficiently difficult to trace the original source. Since the governments are engaged in the widespread data collection and analysis, using various gateways such as Cell phone location information, the Internet, Camera observations, and Drones. As technology and analytics advance, mass surveillance opportunities continue to grow. In which, the Tor Instant Messaging Bundle can come out to be the world's most secure real-time communication tool. "People in countries where communication for the purpose of activism is met with intimidation, violence, and prosecution will be able to avoid the scrutiny of criminal cartels, corrupt officials, and authoritarian governments," states the Tor TIMB project. By the end of March, the experimental test builds of Tor Instant Messaging Bundle (TIMB) is expected to be available, but the first experimental release won't include 'Off The Record' (OTR) capability. OTR mode provides strong encryption for instant messaging conversations. "Tor has grown popular over the past few years as a way of surfing the Web while blocking network surveillance, analysis of your traffic, or other monitoring that threatens personal freedom and privacy, confidential business activities and relationships, and state security," states the Tor Project founders. "The group's work is all the more significant following reports of NSA's foreign and domestic surveillance activities." But, every technology has positive and negative aspects as well. Since, Tor is also a Deep Web friendly tool that allows hackers and cyber criminals to carry out illicit activities. It's a matter of concern, but we have to adopt measures to protect our privacy now, as the former NSA contractor Edward Snowden said: "A child born today will grow up with no conception of privacy at all. They’ll never know what it means to have a private moment to themselves an unrecorded, unanalyzed thought. And that’s a problem because privacy matters, privacy is what allows us to determine who we are and who we want to be. Together we can find a better balance, end mass surveillance and remind the government that if it really wants to know how we feel asking is always cheaper than spying." The NSA has been trying to hack into the Tor network for years, and the FBI was recently caught seizing data from TorMail, an anonymous email service, and trying to use that data to catch hackers. Source
  4. Some believe that bitcoin’s anonymous properties are a bug, not a feature. This past January, New York financial regulator Benjamin Lawsky called for a crackdown on software that anonymizes transactions in the online digital currency, saying it will merely help criminals evade law enforcement. And one of the currency’s biggest supporters, venture capitalist Marc Andreessen, believes bitcoin will truly thrive only after it shrugs off anonymity protections. But some parts of the bitcoin community have other plans in mind. Even as regulators work to tie new identity restrictions to bitcoin businesses, a collection of projects is moving in the opposite direction, trying to preserve or even upgrade bitcoin’s properties as an ultra-private, untraceable payment system as anonymous as handing off a briefcase of unmarked bills. Last week saw the launch of Dark Wallet, a piece of bitcoin software that represents perhaps the most radical move yet to evade tracking of who spends and receives bitcoin. When it comes to describing the project’s intentions, Dark Wallet’s 26-year-old organizer Cody Wilson doesn’t mince words. “It’s just money laundering software,” he says. But despite the controversy that surrounds the idea of untraceable digital cash, efforts to make bitcoin anonymous serve a real need. Bitcoin transactions are public by default, visible to anyone who searches the blockchain, the distributed public ledger of all bitcoin payments that keeps it safe from forgery and fraud. Deny bitcoiners the ability to hide their identity, and they’re left with a serious privacy problem. “The problem is not just about how to buy drugs online,” says Ian Miers, a graduate researcher at Johns Hopkins focused on cryptocurrency privacy. “As bitcoin becomes more mainstream, it becomes an issue of how to fix consumer privacy.” The problem may be even bigger for companies. Legitimate businesses, for instance, may want to hide their transactions so that competitors can’t track their sales growth. Here are a few of the projects seeking a more private way to bitcoin: Dark Wallet Cody Wilson’s project with Amir Taaki and the anarchist group unSystem launched last Thursday with two particular methods for protecting its users’ identities. One is what it calls “CoinJoin.” Every time a user makes a payment with Dark Wallet, the program is set by default to combine the transaction with that of another Dark Wallet user attempting to make a payment around the same time. The communications to set up that multiparty transaction are encrypted, so that detecting who paid whom becomes far more difficult. Eventually, Dark Wallet plans to expand CoinJoin to combine payments of three or more users, creating an even more tangled web of money flows. On top of protections for senders, Dark Wallet adds another one for receivers that it calls “stealth addresses.” When a user publishes a stealth address instead of a normal bitcoin address as his or her public P.O. box for receiving funds, any money sent by another Dark Wallet user to that address goes through an extra obfuscating process. Instead of appearing in the blockchain as being sent to that stealth address, Dark Wallet encrypts the address in such a way that only the recipient can recognize it and sends the money to that encrypted address. The receiver’s Dark Wallet app scans the blockchain for payments encrypted to his or her stealth address and decrypts them to claim the funds. Crucially, no evidence remains in the blockchain that ties the sender and recipient. Shared Coin Dark Wallet isn’t the only wallet that offers to mix up its users’ coins to foil surveillance. So does one of the most popular bitcoin wallets already in use: Blockchain.info. An initiative from the company called Shared Coin implements CoinJoin to protect transactions as large as 50 bitcoins. But users have to choose to turn Shared Coin on. Unlike with Dark Wallet, it’s not enabled by default. And Blockchain gives users a warning that, although it doesn’t log their transactions, it’s subject to laws that might compel it to track their transactions in some situations. “The server does not need to keep any logs and transactions are only kept in memory for a short time,” reads a disclaimer on Blockchain’s site. “However, if the server was compromised or under subpoena it could be forced to keep logs.” Darkcoin The most technically solid method for protecting the anonymity of bitcoin transactions may be to create a new bitcoin altogether, starting with privacy as a first principle. That’s the approach taken byDarkcoin, an alternative cryptocurrency launched in January. Darkcoin has already put 4.1 million digital coins into circulation, which have already gained a value around $1.40 each, one of the fastest ever appreciations of cryptocurrency among the flock of “altcoins” that have chased bitcoin’s success. Like Dark Wallet and Shared Coin, Darkcoin implements CoinJoin, though it calls the feature DarkSend. It take a different approach to that transaction combination trick, though, using a distributed collection of servers around its network that negotiate CoinJoin’s multiparty payments. Anyone can pay a thousand Darkcoins to set up one of those DarkSend servers and, as compensation, will be entered into a random lottery that periodically pays out 10 percent of all new Darkcoins as they’re mined and put into circulation That incentive function hasn’t been set up yet, but already, 42 Darkcoin users are hosting DarkSend servers, according to Evan Duffield, the 32-year-old programmer in Phoenix, Arizona who serves as Darkcoin’s main developer. And as with Dark Wallet, every Darkcoin payment will be anonymized unless users choose to disable its CoinJoin protection. “The whole blockchain will be a fog,” says Duffield. Zerocoin Mixing up transactions makes tracing cryptocurrency payments difficult. One team of cryptography researchers at Johns Hopkins wants to make it mathematically impossible. Later this year, they plan to release Zerocoin, another alternative to bitcoin that uses a technique to anonymize its coins that’s much stronger than Dark Wallet’s or DarkCoin’s, and that’s impossible with bitcoin as it currently functions. Zerocoin uses what cryptographers call “zero knowledge proofs,” a seemingly magical but decades-old trick that can prove a mathematical statement is true without revealing the contents of what’s being computed. That feat allows Zerocoin transactions to be recorded in its blockchain and checked for fraud and forgery without revealing any other information about which coins are being spent or who is spending them. “The only information that ever makes it into the blockchain is the fact that the transaction occurred,” Matthew Green told the audience at the Real World Crypto conference in New York earlier this year. “That’s actually very beautiful.” Zerocoin was originally conceived as an add-on to bitcoin, but it didn’t find enough supporters among the bitcoin developer community to convince them to adopt its code. But that earlier version of its code is also being integrated into Anoncoin, an independent cryptocurrency project. Anoncoin, Zerocoin, and Darkcoin are all unlikely to ever achieve the same acceptance for goods and services as bitcoin has. But it’s worth nothing that if exchanges allow the trade of bitcoins for these more private currencies without requiring identification, they could serve as giant laundry services, anonymizing any funds that are traded into and then out of their networks. Tor Integration The blockchain isn’t the only way to identify bitcoin users. So is old-fashioned tracing of their IP address. John Hopkins’ Miers uses the analogy of an old-fashioned briefcase full of cash: Even if the bills inside are unmarked, the bagman still needs to wear a ski mask and a hoodie to stay anonymous. That’s where the anonymity software Tor comes in, triple-encrypting users’ internet traffic and bouncing it through servers around the world to obscure its origin. Some bitcoin wallets already integrate Tor, such as Blockchain.info. Dark Wallet plans to add Tor to future versions of its software. Soon, that Tor integration will be the norm for bitcoin programs. Mike Hearn, a core bitcoin developer and head of the Bitcoin Foundation’s law and policy committee, says he built a prototype of a Tor-integrated version of bitcoinj, the software that powers popular bitcoin wallets like Hive, Multibit, and Android Wallet. That change is now being built into the public version of bitcoinj by another well-known bitcoin developer known as devrandom. While Hearn says that adding Tor to bitcoinj will represent a significant upgrade to bitcoin’s privacy, he admit it’s not clear whether Tor or any other known protective measure can foil the sophisticated traffic analysis tools of agencies like the NSA, were they to turn their powerful surveillance mechanisms toward tracing bitcoin transactions. “There are no silver bullets in this space,” he says. “But this will make it much harder.” Source
  5. ChrisPC Anonymous Proxy Pro 5.20 ChrisPC Anonymous Proxy Pro is the privacy tool that anybody would need to use to protect their online experience. Browsing, buying online, watching online TV channels or reading online newspapers are part of our daily life. What is important to know is that when we connect to the Internet we are exposed, our buying/browsing habits and our confidential data are at risk. Features ChrisPC Anonymous Proxy Pro has many key features like:Protect your privacy and browse anonymously on the internet.Many proxy servers available from all over the world: USA, Germany, Canada, U.K., France, Italy, Austria, Spain, Switzerland, India, China and other countries.Bypass area restrictions of websites and have access to full content.Block annoying banner ads, reducing the page loading time and conserving your bandwidth.Block rich media and other non-standard types of ads.Block tracking scripts of ad networks and web counters.Multilanguage interface: English, French, German, Romanian.Watch all your favorite TV programmes from outside the UK, USA, Germany, Canada, Switzerland, Italy, France, Spain with Expat Internet Browsing Mode.Support for all major browsers: Internet Explorer 7 or higher, Google Chrome, Firefox 3 or higher, Opera, Safari.Choose which browsers to use the proxy connection.Launch software on Windows boot.Minimize ChrisPC Anonymous Proxy Pro to systray.Hardware: 1000 MHz processor or higher, such as an Intel Pentium III or AMD AthlonMemory : more than 256 MB RAMHDD Space : 15 MBSoftware: Windows XP, Microsoft Vista, Windows 7 or Windows 8Internet Explorer 7 or higher, Firefox 3 or higher, Google Chrome, Safari.Homepage: http://proxy.chris-pc.com/ Language: ML Medicine: Serial Size: 3,50 Mb.
  6. Anonymous is testing Airchat, a free communications tool for the world that uses only radio waves Lulz Labs Online hacktivist collective Anonymous has announced that it is working on a new tool called Airchat which could allow people to communicate without the need for a phone or an internet connection - using radio waves instead. Anonymous, the amorphous group best known for attacking high profile targets like Sony and the CIA in recent years, said on the Lulz Labs project's Github page: "Airchat is a free communication tool [that] doesn't need internet infrastructure [or] a cell phone network. Instead it relies on any available radio link or device capable of transmitting audio." The idea is that people all over the world, including those in rural areas and developing countries, will one day be able to communicate for free without the need for a mobile phone network, phone line or internet access. While the project is workable at the moment, it is simply a proof of concept at this stage and Anonymous has revealed Airchat in the hope to get more people involved in developing the technology as well as raising funds. Interactive chess Despite the Airchat system being highly involved and too complex for most people in its current form, Anonymous says it has so far used it to play interactive chess games with people at 180 miles away; share pictures and even established encrypted low bandwidth digital voice chats. In order to get Airchat to work, you will need to have a handheld radio transceiver, a laptop running either Windows, Mac OS X or Linux, and be able to install and run several pieces of complex software. Anonymous says that a cheap radio transmitter costs as little as $40 (£23.80) meaning the system should be affordable to most people or communities. However because the system isn't working with a specific make or model of transmitter, connecting them to your laptop is a little tricky as there is no standard connector on these devices. Decode "Almost every single home in this world has a common AM and/or FM radio. In cases where not everyone is able to get [a] cheap radio transceiver, [they can] at least be able to decode packets being transmitted via a pirate FM station" Anonymous said. Video The video above shows the Airchat tool in use, evening managing to pull up Twitter search results for the keyword "Ukraine". While it is clearly not as fast and graphically rich as a standard internet browser, for someone looking to get crucial information fast, it could prove a vital tool. Anonymous says that Airchat has numerous use cases other than preventing government agencies like the NSA from spying on citizens, ranging from people living in countries where the internet has been shut down or censored, such as Twitter being banned in Turkey or the telecommunications network being shut down in Crimea by Russian forces. NGOs and medical teams working in Africa or disaster zones who need to coordinate aid efforts or explorers at expedition basecamps who want to communicate from rural areas or with rescue teams would also find the solution useful. Connecting the world This is not the first time that Anonymous has tried to create free communications to connect the world. Since the Arab Springs began in 2010, Anonymous has opened up communication channels in countries when they have been closed, creating internet access points and producing "care packages" that include information about everything from first aid to how to access dial-up internet, for example, in Syria in 2012. The hacktivist collective has also worked together with the dissident group Telecomix to help activists access banned websites in Bahrain, Egypt, Libya, Jordan, and Zimbabwe. Source
  7. ChrisPC Anonymous Proxy Pro 5.30 ChrisPC Anonymous Proxy Pro is the privacy tool that anybody would need to use to protect their online experience. Browsing, buying online, watching online TV channels or reading online newspapers are part of our daily life. What is important to know is that when we connect to the Internet we are exposed, our buying/browsing habits and our confidential data are at risk. Features ChrisPC Anonymous Proxy Pro has many key features like:Protect your privacy and browse anonymously on the internet.Many proxy servers available from all over the world: USA, Germany, Canada, U.K., France, Italy, Austria, Spain, Switzerland, India, China and other countries.Bypass area restrictions of websites and have access to full content.Block annoying banner ads, reducing the page loading time and conserving your bandwidth.Block rich media and other non-standard types of ads.Block tracking scripts of ad networks and web counters.Multilanguage interface: English, French, German, Romanian.Watch all your favorite TV programmes from outside the UK, USA, Germany, Canada, Switzerland, Italy, France, Spain with Expat Internet Browsing Mode.Support for all major browsers: Internet Explorer 7 or higher, Google Chrome, Firefox 3 or higher, Opera, Safari.Choose which browsers to use the proxy connection.Launch software on Windows boot.Minimize ChrisPC Anonymous Proxy Pro to systray.Hardware: 1000 MHz processor or higher, such as an Intel Pentium III or AMD AthlonMemory : more than 256 MB RAMHDD Space : 15 MBSoftware: Windows XP, Microsoft Vista, Windows 7 or Windows 8Internet Explorer 7 or higher, Firefox 3 or higher, Google Chrome, Safari.Homepage: http://proxy.chris-pc.com/ Language: ML Medicine: Serial Size: 3,50 Mb.
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    Real Hide IP 4.3.9.8

    Real Hide IP 4.3.9.8 Real Hide IP - a small but useful program to protect your real IP address and encrypt your own information. The program Hide IP allows you to surf the internet anonymously by hiding your real IP address, protecting your own information against hackers and provide full encryption of data. Assigned one of our fake IP addresses which can be from countries such as the UK, USA, France, Germany and other. Real Hide IP support Opera, Internet Explorer, Firefox, MyIE, Maxthon and other browsers and is compatible with all types of routers, family networks, firewalls, wireless networks and other kinds of Internet. It is extremely easy to use and has a friendly interface. Real Hide IP support Opera, Internet Explorer, Firefox, MyIE, Maxthon and other browsers and is compatible with all types of routers, home networking, firewalls, wireless networks and other kinds of Internet. It is extremely easy to use and has a friendly interface. Features: To hide your real IP-addressesAnonymous Web SurfingProtect your personal information from hackersRemoval of the prohibition (ban) with an account on their forums or websitesPrevention of tracking your activity on the InternetSupports popular Internet browsersWebsite: http://www.real-hide-ip.com OS: Windows XP / Vista / 7 / 8 Language: Eng / Rus Medicine: Patch Size: 2,69 Mb.
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