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  1. If there were any major sites that took a web traffic pummeling in 2019 it was Yahoo and Tumblr. That’s according to a new report from SimilarWeb. The report looks back on key web trends in 2019. Among those trends were some pretty bad news for some sites. Particularly, SimilarWeb’s report says Tumblr saw its web traffic plummet 33% since 2018, when the site banned adult content. Yahoo saw a similar drop from its 2017 numbers, falling 33.6% during the period. Other key findings from the report: Total web traffic is on the rise, growing 8% in 2019 to 223 billion visits per month to the top 100 websites worldwide. Mobile is fueling much of that growth. While desktop web traffic decreased 3.3% since 2017, mobile web traffic shot up 30.6% over the same period. But with the mobile web comes shrinking attention spans. The report says that visitors are spending 49 seconds less on websites per visit than they did three years ago. The top 10 sites took 167.5 billion visits per month in 2019–a 10.7% increase. Mobile visits claim the majority of visits made to “vice” sites–those that involve porn and gambling. The U.S. leads the world when it comes to visiting the websites. In 2019, over 300 billion visits per month to sites were made from America. The takeaway? Mobile is quickly becoming the new norm, but websites are going to have to work harder to keep visitor attention as our attention spans continue to shrink. Source
  2. The folks behind the largest known hack of user data to date are finally paying up. Yahoo, now owned by Verizon, recently agreed to pay $117.5 million as part of a proposed class action settlement stemming from a series of breaches in the 2010s that affected 3 billion people—basically Yahoo’s then-entire user base. If you had a Yahoo account during that time, you might have already received an email this week telling you all this, along with the fact that you may be eligible for free credit monitoring or up to $100 as recompense for that whole to-do. The deadline for claims is July 20. The question now, as you may be asking yourself, is how does one cash in on Yahoo’s apology? Any U.S. resident who had an account between Jan. 1, 2012 and Dec. 31, 2016 is eligible to submit a claim here for either two years of free credit monitoring through AllClear ID or “alternative compensation”: cold, hard cash of up to $100 if you show you already have credit services. Individuals can also file claims through the mail and online for any out-of-pocket costs tied to these breaches. Users that can document specific losses suffered because of these hacks are eligible to receive reimbursement up to $25,000. Though that $100 depends on how many eligible users actually enter claims. It could go as high as $358.80 if most folks opt to do nothing, or it could drop down to a few dollars if even just a third of the 194 million potential class-action lawsuit members file a claim. Not that anyone could blame them, what with the sting of Equifax’s breach still fresh on a lot of our minds. Instead of the $125 windfall most victims originally expected, an absolute pittance for exposing the data of nearly 150 million people, the Federal Trade Commission issued a warning that each claimant in Equifax’s case would likely only get “a small amount of money” if more people didn’t opt for free credit monitoring instead. And who wouldn’t want free credit services—compiled from three national credit agencies that include, oh yeah that’s right, the very company that screwed up in the first place! But even Equifax’s breach pales in comparison to Yahoo’s fuck-up history. Hackers, likely state-sponsored, made off with credentials for all 3 billion Yahoo accounts in 2013, though the company didn’t disclose the breach—along with a separate incident in 2014 that affected 400 million accounts—until 2016. The Securities and Exchange Commission ultimately hit Yahoo with a $35 million fine for its failure to quickly inform users that their information might have been stolen. Even still, it took another full year before the full extent of that first breach became known; Yahoo’s original estimates had the number of victims at 1 million. A final hearing on Yahoo’s settlement’s scheduled for April. Source
  3. Verizon Media, the division comprising brands like HuffPost, AOL, Yahoo, TechCrunch and Engadget, is set to lay off about 150 employees, the latest retrenchment by the telco’s still-declining digital-media group. Verizon confirmed the cuts, which were first reported by CNN. The job cuts represent around 1.4% of the 10,500 employees in Verizon Media, which the telco formed after acquiring Yahoo and AOL. Verizon Media did not provide details on which areas of the business will be affected by the layoffs. The pink-slips will hit U.S. teams across the organization, per CNN. In a statement, a Verizon Media rep said, “Our goal is to create the best experiences for our consumers and the best platforms for our customers. Today we are investing in premium content, connections and commerce experiences that connect people to their passions and continue to align our resources to opportunities where we feel we can differentiate ourselves and scale faster.” The cutbacks come after Verizon Media let go 7% of its employees in January, or around 800 staffers. Verizon Media revenue in the third quarter of 2019 was $1.8 billion, flat with the prior quarter and down 2% year over year. Revenue from mobile advertising is now outpacing desktop, which has been declining for years, according to the company. Going forward, Verizon Media is focused on augmenting its advertising revenue with subscription fees (via services like HuffPost Plus and TechCrunch’s Extra Crunch), and transactions and ecommerce, such as the launch of Yahoo Sportsbook to allow mobile sports betting (initially only for users in New Jersey), CEO Guru Gowrappan said at a media conference last month. Gowrappen, speaking the Code Media conference, also said Verizon is not selling HuffPost after reports that the telco was shopping the brand (possibly because it could not find a buyer). Verizon Media previously sold off other assets including Tumblr, Flickr and Moviefone. Source
  4. Alex42

    Fast Video Downloader

    Fast Video Downloader 3.1.0.45 Fast Video Downloader is software which allows you to download videos from Bing, Youku.com, Vimeo, DailyMotion, Metacafe, Facebook, Worldfloat, Veoh, Break, CollegeHumor, EHow, Imdb, Academicearth, Bliptv, Anitube, Blinkx, Yahoo, Flickr, Zerodollarmovies, Bambuser, S56, Lemonde.Fr, say-move.org ,video.fc2 , cyro.se , littlethings.com, sohu.com, BoxTv.com, livestream.com, rutube.ru , pandora.tv , ign.com , videa.hu and many more video sites . It can also download videos from sites which use mp4, avi, flv , webm , wmv , 3gp and mp3 file format or host videos. Fast Video Downloader can download live streams from livestream.com and other websites. You can search videos directly in the application and add to download list. It can also convert videos to iPhone, iPad, iPod, Android, PSP device compatible format. It can extract audio (mp3) from video. It can change resolution of the video without changing video format. It has a built-in scheduler to schedule the download of the videos. You can also download multiple videos simultaneously. Features and Benefits • Download Unlimited Videos and playlists from 1000+ video sites • Search video directly from application • Download Live Stream videos • Download Full HD video • Set Video Download Schedule • Unlimited multiple download • Convert Videos to MP4, AVI, WMV, MP3, iPhone, iPad and more • Manage your download history of videos. • Free Application updates & submit feedback for failed videos. • Download & Convert Private / Restricted Videos NB: The license is provided for 1 year. Giveaway
  5. (Reuters) - Yahoo has struck a revised $117.5 million settlement with millions of people whose email addresses and other personal information were stolen in the largest data breach in history. The proposed class-action settlement made public on Tuesday was designed to address criticisms of U.S. District Judge Lucy Koh in San Jose, California. She rejected an earlier version of the accord on Jan. 28, and her approval is still required. Koh said the original settlement was not "fundamentally fair, adequate and reasonable" because it had no overall dollar value and did not say how much victims might expect to recover. She also said the legal fees appeared to be too high. Yahoo, now part of New York-based Verizon Communications Inc, had been accused of being slow to disclose three data breaches affecting about 3 billion accounts from 2013 to 2016. The new settlement includes at least $55 million for victims' out-of-pocket expenses and other costs, $24 million for two years of credit monitoring, up to $30 million for legal fees, and up to $8.5 million for other expenses. It covers as many as 194 million people in the United States and Israel with roughly 896 million accounts. John Yanchunis, a lawyer for the plaintiffs, in a court filing called the $117.5 million the "biggest common fund ever obtained in a data breach case." He did not immediately respond to requests for additional comment. Separately, Verizon agreed to spend $306 million between 2019 and 2022 on information security, five times what Yahoo spent from 2013 to 2016. It also pledged to quadruple Yahoo's staffing in that area. "The settlement demonstrates our strong commitment to security," Verizon said in a statement. Yahoo agreed in July 2016 to sell its internet business to Verizon for $4.83 billion. Only later did it reveal the scope of the breaches, prompting a price cut to $4.48 billion. Verizon wrote off much of Yahoo's value in December. U.S. prosecutors charged two Russian intelligence agents and two hackers in connection with one of the breaches in 2017. One hacker later pleaded guilty. The case is In re: Yahoo Inc Customer Data Security Breach Litigation, U.S. District Court, Northern District of California, No. 16-md-02752. Source
  6. Yahoo plans to enable end-to-end encryption for all of its Mail users next year. The company is working with Google on the project and the encryption will be mostly transparent for users, making it as simple as possible to use. Alex Stamos, CISO at Yahoo, said that the project has been a priority since he joined the company a few months ago and will be a key way to make online life safer for millions of users. Yahoo is using the browser plugin Google released in June that enables end-to-end encryption of all data leaving the browser. Stamos said Yahoo is working to ensure that its system works well with Google’s so that encrypted communications between Yahoo Mail and Gmail users will be simple. “The goal is to have complete compatibility with Gmail,” Stamos said during a talk at the Black Hat USA conference here Thursday. The email encryption isn’t the only security improvement on the horizon for Yahoo. The company is also working on enabling HSTS on its servers, as well as certificate transparency. HSTS (HTTP strict transport security) allows Web sites to tell users’ browsers that they only want to communicate over an encrypted connection. Thecertificate transparency concept involves a system of public logs that list all certificates issued by cooperating certificate authorities. It requires the CAs to voluntarily submit their certificates, but it would help protect against attacks such as spoofing Web sites or man-in-the-middle. The security upgrades on the docket at Yahoo are aimed at making it easier for everyday users to use the Internet safely and securely, without needing to be security or privacy experts, Stamos said. The security industry spends a lot of time working out defenses and new products to protect against exotic attacks while users are being targeted by much more mundane attacks that still don’t have effective solutions. “Post-Snowden, we have a strain of nihilism that’s keeping us from focusing on what’s real,” Stamos said. “We as an industry have failed. We’ve failed to keep users safe. “If we can’t build systems that our users in the twenty-fifth percentile can use, we’re failing. And we are failing. We don’t build systems that normal people can use.” Source
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