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  1. By Matthew Cole First published February 8th 2014, 1:14 am ritish spies have developed “dirty tricks” for use against nations, hackers, terror groups, suspected criminals and arms dealers that include releasing computer viruses, spying on journalists and diplomats, jamming phones and computers, and using sex to lure targets into “honey traps.” Documents taken from the National Security Agency by Edward Snowden and exclusively obtained by NBC News describe techniques developed by a secret British spy unit called the Joint Threat Research and Intelligence Group (JTRIG) as part of a growing mi
  2. February 04, 2014 22:42 The US National Security Agency likely collects intelligence on congressional lawmakers and members of their staff, a Justice Department official admitted at a committee hearing on Tuesday. Deputy Attorney General James Cole of the US Department of Justice testified during a House Judiciary Committee hearing which was examining proposals to reform the NSA surveillance policies that have been revealed in an ongoing series of disclosures since June. Among the most damning revelations leaked by former NSA contractor Edward Snowden was the realization that the NSA indiscri
  3. By Jay Syrmopoulos 2 days ago This past Sunday evening former NSA contractor Edward Snowden sat down for an interview with German television network ARD. The interview has been intentionally blocked from the US public, with virtually no major broadcast news outlets covering this story. In addition, the video has been taken down almost immediately every time its posted on YouTube. In contrast, this was treated as a major political event in both print and broadcast media, in Germany, and across much of the world. In the interview, Mr. Snowden lays out a succinct case as to how these domestic s
  4. Luke Harding Saturday 1 February 2014 He was politically conservative, a gun owner, a geek – and the man behind the biggest intelligence leak in history. In this exclusive extract from his new book, Luke Harding looks at Edward Snowden's journey from patriot to America's most wanted In late December 2001, someone calling themselves TheTrueHOOHA had a question. He was an 18-year-old American male with impressive IT skills and a sharp intelligence. His real identity was unknown. Everyone who posted on Ars Technica, a popular technology website, did so anonymously. TheTrueHOOHA wanted to set u
  5. January 31, 2014 05:41 Edited time: January 31, 2014 06:21 Documents released by US whistleblower Edward Snowden show the Communications Security Establishment Canada (CSEC) used airport Wi-Fi to track passengers from around the world. Travelers passing through a major Canadian airport were potentially caught up in a vast electronic surveillance net, which allowed the nation’s electronic spy agency to track the wireless devices of thousands of airline passengers - even for days after they had departed the terminal, a document obtained by CBC News revealed. The document shows the spy agency
  6. January 29, 2014 11:31 Edward Snowden has been nominated for the Nobel Peace Prize by two Norwegian lawmakers, who say the NSA whistleblower contributed to transparency and global stability by revealing the depth and sophistication of the global surveillance apparatus. Snorre Valen and Baard Vegar Solhjell, parliamentarians from Norways Socialist Left Party, announced the nomination on Facebook on Wednesday. Noting that peace is more than simply the absence of war, the MPs said that Snowden had contributed to global security by revealing the nature and technological prowess of modern surv
  7. 27 January 2014 Last updated at 13:10 GMT The BBC's Gordon Corera explains how agencies spy in the digital world The internet was designed to be free and open. Eight months after Edward Snowden's first leaks of classified information, is that still the case? The technology pioneers who designed the net's original protocols saw their creation as a way to share information freely across a network of networks. Yet Edward Snowden's leaks of classified documents from the US National Security Agency have revealed that American spies - and their British counterparts at GCHQ - now use that very sam
  8. 26.01.2014 45 mins ago Fugitive former NSA contractor Edward Snowden has claimed that US government officials "want to kill me" in an exclusive interview which German television says it conducted in Moscow. German NDR television issued a further snippet ahead of a broadcast late Sunday in Europe of an exclusive interview with Snowden in which the intelligence whistleblower claims that US officials wanted him killed. "These people, and they are government officials, have said they would love to put a bullet in my head or poison me when I come out of the supermarket, and then watch as I die in
  9. By Associated Press 30 minutes ago BERLIN (AP) — Former NSA contractor Edward Snowden claims in a new interview that the U.S. agency is involved in industrial espionage. German public television broadcaster ARD released a written statement before an interview airing Sunday night in which it quotes Snowden as saying that if German engineering company Siemens had information that would benefit the United States — but had nothing to do with national security needs — the National Security Agency would still use it. ARD did not give any further context and it was not clear what exactly Snowden ac
  10. By Michael J de la Merced Jan 26, 2014, 06.18 AM IST DAVOS (Switzerland): Russia plans to extend its offer of asylum to Edward J Snowden beyond August, a Russian lawmaker said on Friday at the WEF here. The lawmaker, Aleksei K Pushkov, chairman of the foreign affairs committee in Russia's lower house of parliament, hinted during a panel discussion that the extension of temporary refugee status for Snowden, the former National Security Agency contractor, might be indefinite. "He will not be sent out of Russia," Pushkov said. "It will be up to Snowden." He added that Snowden's father believes h
  11. Updated: 14:22, Friday January 24, 2014 The US government is seeking billions of dollars in penalties and damages from the company that did the background check on National Security Agency leaker Edward Snowden. The US government is seeking billions of dollars in penalties and damages from the company that did the background check on National Security Agency leaker Edward Snowden. The Justice Department, in its complaint, said US Investigations Services, the largest of several companies that have government contracts to investigate current and prospective federal employees, lied about 665,00
  12. WASHINGTON Sun Jan 19, 2014 2:12pm EST A picture of Edward Snowden, a contractor at the National Security Agency (NSA), is seen on a computer screen displaying a page of a Chinese news website, in Beijing in this June 13, 2013 photo illustration. Credit: Reuters/Jason Lee (Reuters) - The head of the U.S. House of Representatives Intelligence Committee said on Sunday he is investigating whether former spy agency contractor Edward Snowden had help from Russia in stealing and revealing U.S. government secrets. "I believe there's a reason he ended up in the hands - the loving arms - of an FSB a
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